Updated documentation for 4.67.
authorPhilip Hazel <ph10@hermes.cam.ac.uk>
Wed, 11 Apr 2007 15:26:09 +0000 (15:26 +0000)
committerPhilip Hazel <ph10@hermes.cam.ac.uk>
Wed, 11 Apr 2007 15:26:09 +0000 (15:26 +0000)
doc/doc-docbook/HowItWorks.txt
doc/doc-docbook/Makefile
doc/doc-docbook/Markup.txt
doc/doc-docbook/Pre-xml
doc/doc-docbook/filter.xfpt
doc/doc-docbook/spec.xfpt
doc/doc-txt/OptionLists.txt

index 2766f28..4c51ae3 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-$Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/HowItWorks.txt,v 1.5 2006/07/31 13:19:36 ph10 Exp $
+$Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/HowItWorks.txt,v 1.6 2007/04/11 15:26:09 ph10 Exp $
 
 CREATING THE EXIM DOCUMENTATION
 
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ bought the Adobe distiller software.)
 
 A demand for a version in "info" format led me to write a Perl script that
 converted the SGCAL input into a Texinfo file. Because of the somewhat
-restrictive requirements of Texinfo, this script has always needed a lot of
+restrictive requirements of Texinfo, this script always needed a lot of
 maintenance, and was never totally satisfactory.
 
 The HTML version of the documentation was originally produced from the Texinfo
@@ -72,10 +72,28 @@ Equally, if better ways of processing the XML become available, they can be
 adopted without affecting the source maintenance.
 
 A number of issues arose while setting this all up, which are best summed up by
-the statement that a lot of the technology is (in 2006) still very immature. It
-is probable that trying to do this conversion any earlier would not have been
-anywhere near as successful. The main problems that still bother me are
-described in the penultimate section of this document.
+the statement that a lot of the technology was (in 2006) still very immature.
+Trying to do this conversion any earlier would probably not have been anywhere
+near as successful. The main problems that bother me in the XML-generated
+documentation are described in the penultimate section of this document.
+
+The major problems were originally in producing PostScript and PDF outputs. The
+available free software for doing this was and still is (we are now in 2007)
+cumbersome and slow, and does not support certain output features that I would
+like. My response to this was, over a period of two years, to write an XML
+processor called SDoP (Simple DocBook Processor). This program reads DocBook
+XML and writes PostScript, without using any of the heavyweight apparatus that
+is required for xmlto and fop (the previously used software).
+
+An experimental first version of SDoP will be used for the Exim 4.67
+documentation. A full release of SDoP requires further work. SDoP's output
+includes features that are missing when xmlto/fop is used, and it also runs
+about 60 times faster. The main manual can be formatted in 2 seconds instead of
+2 minutes, which makes checking and fixing mistakes much easier.
+
+The Makefile that is used to build the various forms of output will, for the
+moment, support both ways of producing PostScript and PDF output, though the
+default is now to use SDoP.
 
 The following sections describe the processes by which the xfpt files are
 transformed into the final output documents. In practice, the details are coded
@@ -89,15 +107,27 @@ run Gentoo Linux, and a lot of things have been installed as dependencies that
 I am not fully aware of. This is what I know about (version numbers are current
 at the time of writing):
 
-. xfpt 0.00
+. xfpt 0.01
 
   This converts the master source file into a DocBook XML file.
 
+. sdop 0.00
+
+  This is my new, still-very-alpha, DocBook-to-PostScript processor.
+
+. ps2pdf
+
+  This is a wrapper script that is part of the GhostScript distribution. It
+  converts a PostScript file into a PDF file. It is used to process the output
+  from SDoP. It is not required when xmlto/fop is being used to generate PDF
+  output.
+
 . xmlto 0.0.18
 
   This is a shell script that drives various XML processors. It is used to
-  produce "formatted objects" for PostScript and PDF output, and to produce
-  HTML output. It uses xsltproc, libxml, libxslt, libexslt, and possibly other
+  produce "formatted objects" when PostScript and PDF output is being generated
+  using fop (the old way) rather than SDoP. It is always used to produce HTML
+  output. It uses xsltproc, libxml, libxslt, libexslt, and possibly other
   things that I have not figured out, to apply the DocBook XSLT stylesheets.
 
 . libxml 1.8.17
@@ -107,15 +137,15 @@ at the time of writing):
   These are all installed on my box; I do not know which of libxml or libxml2
   the various scripts are actually using.
 
-. xsl-stylesheets-1.68.1
+. xsl-stylesheets-1.70.1
 
   These are the standard DocBook XSL stylesheets.
 
 . fop 0.20.5
 
   FOP is a processor for "formatted objects". It is written in Java. The fop
-  command is a shell script that drives it. It is used to generate PostScript
-  and PDF output.
+  command is a shell script that drives it. It required only if you do not
+  want to use SDoP and ps2pdf to generate PostScript and PDF output.
 
 . w3m 0.5.1
 
@@ -157,9 +187,15 @@ this process, including the master DocBook source, called spec.xml. Of course,
 the usual features of "make" ensure that if this already exists and is
 up-to-date, it is not needlessly rebuilt.
 
+Because there are now two ways of creating the PostScript and PDF outputs,
+there are two targets for each one. For example fop-spec.ps makes PostScript
+using fop, and sdop-spec.ps makes it using SDoP. The generic targets spec.ps
+and spec.pdf now point to the SDoP versions.
+
 The "test" series of targets were created so that small tests could easily be
 run fairly quickly, because processing even the shortish XML document takes
-a bit of time, and processing the main specification takes ages.
+a bit of time, and processing the main specification takes ages -- except when
+using SDoP for PostScript and PDF.
 
 Another target is "exim.8". This runs a locally written Perl script called
 x2man, which extracts the list of command line options from the spec.xml file,
@@ -191,11 +227,11 @@ Pre-xml was written. This is used to preprocess the .xml files before they are
 handed to the main processors. Adding one more tool onto the front of the
 processing chain does at least seem to be in the spirit of XML processing.
 
-The XML processors themselves make use of style files, which can be overridden
-by local versions. There is one that applies to all styles, called MyStyle.xsl,
-and others for the different output formats. I have included comments in these
-style files to explain what changes I have made. Some of the changes are quite
-significant.
+The XML processors other than SDoP make use of style files, which can be
+overridden by local versions. There is one that applies to all styles, called
+MyStyle.xsl, and others for the different output formats. I have included
+comments in these style files to explain what changes I have made. Some of the
+changes are quite significant.
 
 
 THE PRE-XML SCRIPT
@@ -239,9 +275,13 @@ options it is given. The currently available options are as follows:
 
   The use of ligatures would be nice for the PostScript and PDF formats. Sadly,
   it turns out that fop cannot at present handle the FB01 character correctly.
-  The only format that does so is the HTML format, but when I used this in the
-  test version, people complained that it made searching for words difficult.
-  So at the moment, this option is not used. :-(
+  Happily this problem is now avoided when SDoP is used to generate PostScript
+  (and thence PDF) because SDoP automatically uses an "fi" ligature for
+  non-fixed-width fonts.
+
+  The only xmlto format that handles FB01 is the HTML format, but when I used
+  this in the test version, people complained that it made searching for words
+  difficult. So this option is in practice not used at all.
 
 -noindex
 
@@ -252,11 +292,11 @@ options it is given. The currently available options are as follows:
 -oneindex
 
   Remove the XML to generate a Concept and an Options Index, and add XML to
-  generate a single index. The only output processor that supports multiple
-  indexes is the processor that produces "formatted objects" for PostScript and
-  PDF output. The HTML processor ignores the XML settings for multiple indexes
-  and just makes one unified index. Specifying two indexes gets you two copies
-  of the same index, so this has to be changed.
+  generate a single index. The only output processors that support multiple
+  indexes are SDoP and the processor that produces "formatted objects" for
+  PostScript and PDF output for fop. The HTML processor ignores the XML
+  settings for multiple indexes and just makes one unified index. Specifying
+  two indexes gets you two copies of the same index, so this has to be changed.
 
 -optbreak
 
@@ -270,11 +310,31 @@ options it is given. The currently available options are as follows:
 
 CREATING POSTSCRIPT AND PDF
 
-These two output formats are created in three stages, with an additional fourth
-stage for PDF. First, the XML is pre-processed by the Pre-xml script. For the
-filter document, the <bookinfo> element is removed so that no title page is
-generated. For the main specification, the only change is to insert line
-breakpoints via -optbreak.
+These two output formats are created either by using my new SDoP program to
+produce PostScript which can then be run through ps2pdf to make a PDF, or by
+using xmlto and fop in the old way.
+
+
+USING SDOP TO CREATE POSTSCRIPT AND PDF
+
+PostScript output is created in two stages. First, the XML is pre-processed by
+the Pre-xml script. For the filter document, the <bookinfo> element is removed
+so that no title page is generated. For the main specification, the only change
+is to insert line breakpoints via -optbreak.
+
+The SDoP program is then used to create PostScript output directly from the XML
+input. Then the ps2pdf command is used to generated a PDF from the PostScript.
+There are no external stylesheets that are used by SDoP. Any variations to the
+default format are specified inline using "processing instructions".
+
+
+USING XMLTO AND FOP TO CREATE POSTSCRIPT AND PDF
+
+This is the original way of creating PostScript and PDF output. The processing
+happens in three stages, with an additional fourth stage for PDF. First, the
+XML is pre-processed by the Pre-xml script. For the filter document, the
+<bookinfo> element is removed so that no title page is generated. For the main
+specification, the only change is to insert line breakpoints via -optbreak.
 
 Second, the xmlto command is used to produce a "formatted objects" (.fo) file.
 This process uses the following stylesheets:
@@ -328,9 +388,9 @@ The last one is particularly meaningless gobbledegook. Some of the errors and
 warnings are repeated many times. Nevertheless, it does eventually produce
 usable output, though I have a number of issues with it (see a later section of
 this document). Maybe one day there will be a new release of fop that does
-better (there are now signs - February 2006 - that this may be happening).
-Maybe there will be some other means of producing PostScript and PDF from
-DocBook XML. Maybe porcine aeronautics will really happen.
+better. In the meantime, I have written my own program for making PostScript
+output -- see the previous section -- because the problems with xmlto/fop were
+sufficiently annoying.
 
 The PDF file that is produced by this process has one problem: the pages, as
 shown by acroread in its thumbnail display, are numbered sequentially from one
@@ -345,13 +405,16 @@ GhostScript (gv).
 
 THE PAGELABELPDF SCRIPT
 
-This script reads the standard input and writes the standard output. It
-searches for the PDF object that sets data in its "Catalog", and adds
-appropriate information about page labels. The number of front-matter pages
-(those before chapter 1) is hard-wired into this script as 12 because I could
-not find a way of determining it automatically. As the current table of
-contents finishes near the top of the 11th page, there is plenty of room for
-expansion, so it is unlikely to be a problem.
+This script reads the standard input and writes the standard output. It is used
+to "tidy up" the PDF output that is produced by fop. It is not needed when
+PDF output is generated from SDoP's output using ps2pdf.
+
+The PageLabelPDF script searches for the PDF object that sets data in its
+"Catalog", and adds appropriate information about page labels. The number of
+front-matter pages (those before chapter 1) is hard-wired into this script as
+12 because I could not find a way of determining it automatically. As the
+current table of contents finishes near the top of the 11th page, there is
+plenty of room for expansion, so it is unlikely to be a problem.
 
 Having added data to the PDF file, the script then finds the xref table at the
 end of the file, and adjusts its entries to allow for the added text. This
@@ -481,7 +544,8 @@ UNRESOLVED PROBLEMS
 
 There are a number of unresolved problems with producing the Exim documentation
 in the manner described above. I will describe them here in the hope that in
-future some way round them can be found.
+future some way round them can be found. Some of the problems are solved by
+using SDoP instead of xmlto/fop to produce PostScript and PDF output.
 
 (1)  When a whole chain of tools is processing a file, an error somewhere
      in the middle is often very hard to debug. For instance, an error in the
@@ -491,11 +555,12 @@ future some way round them can be found.
      targets was to help in checking out these kinds of problem.
 
 (2)  There is a mechanism in XML for marking parts of the document as
-     "revised", and I have arranged for xfpt markup to use it. However, at the
-     moment, the only output format that pays attention to this is the HTML
-     output, which sets a green background. There are therefore no revision
-     marks (change bars) in the PostScript, PDF, or text output formats as
-     there used to be. (There never were for Texinfo.)
+     "revised", and I have arranged for xfpt markup to use it. However, the
+     only xmlto output format that pays attention to this is the HTML output,
+     which sets a green background. If xmlto/fop is used to generate PostScript
+     and PDF, there are no revision marks (change bars). This problem
+     is not present when SDoP is used. However, the text and Texinfo output
+     format lack revision indications.
 
 (3)  The index entries in the HTML format take you to the top of the section
      that is referenced, instead of to the point in the section where the index
@@ -504,14 +569,17 @@ future some way round them can be found.
 (4)  The HTML output supports only a single index, so the concept and options
      index entries have to be merged.
 
-(5)  The index for the PostScript/PDF output does not merge identical page
-     numbers, which makes some entries look ugly.
+(5)  The index for the PostScript/PDF output created by xmlto/fop does not
+     merge identical page numbers, which makes some entries look ugly. This is
+     not a problem when SDoP is used.
 
 (6)  None of the indexes (PostScript/PDF and HTML) make use of textual
-     markup; the text is all roman, without any italic or boldface.
+     markup; the text is all roman, without any italic or boldface. For
+     PostScript/PDF, this is not a problem when SDoP is used.
 
-(7)  I turned off hyphenation in the PostScript/PDF output, because it was
-     being done so badly.
+(7)  I turned off hyphenation in the PostScript/PDF output produced by
+     xmlto/fop, because it was being done so badly. Needless to say, I made
+     SDoP do a better job. These comments apply to xmlto/fop:
 
      (a) It seems to force hyphenation if it is at all possible, without
          regard to the "tightness" or "looseness" of the line. Decent
@@ -522,7 +590,7 @@ future some way round them can be found.
      (b) It uses an algorithmic form of hyphenation that doesn't always produce
          acceptable word breaks. (I prefer to use a hyphenation dictionary.)
 
-(8)  The PostScript/PDF output is badly paginated:
+(8)  The PostScript/PDF output produced by xmlto/fop is badly paginated:
 
      (a) There seems to be no attempt to avoid "widow" and "orphan" lines on
          pages. A "widow" is the last line of a paragraph at the top of a page,
@@ -532,8 +600,12 @@ future some way round them can be found.
      (b) There seems to be no attempt to prevent section headings being placed
          last on a page, with no following text on the page.
 
+     Neither of these problems occurs when SDoP is used to produce the
+     PostScript/PDF output.
+
 (9)  The fop processor does not support "fi" ligatures, not even if you put the
-     appropriate Unicode character into the source by hand.
+     appropriate Unicode character into the source by hand. Again, this is not
+     a problem if SDoP is used.
 
 (10) There are no diagrams in the new documentation. This is something I hope
      to work on. The previously used Aspic command for creating line art from a
@@ -544,18 +616,23 @@ future some way round them can be found.
 
 (11) The use of a "zero-width space" works well as a way of specifying that
      Exim option names can be split, without hyphens, over line breaks.
-     However, when an option is not split, if the line is very "loose", the
-     zero-width space is expanded, along with other spaces. This is a totally
-     crazy thing to, but unfortunately it is suggested by the Unicode
-     definition of the zero-width space, which says "its presence between two
-     characters does not prevent increased letter spacing in justification".
-     It seems that the implementors of fop have understood "letter spacing"
-     also to include "word spacing". Sigh.
 
-The consequence of (7), (8), and (9) is that the PostScript/PDF output looks as
-if it comes from some of the very early attempts at text formatting of around
-20 years ago. We can only hope that 20 years' progress is not going to get
-lost, and that things will improve in this area.
+     However, when xmlto/fop is being used and an option is not split, if the
+     line is very "loose", the zero-width space is expanded, along with other
+     spaces. This is a totally crazy thing to, but unfortunately it is
+     suggested by the Unicode definition of the zero-width space, which says
+     "its presence between two characters does not prevent increased letter
+     spacing in justification". It seems that the implementors of fop have
+     understood "letter spacing" also to include "word spacing". Sigh.
+
+     This problem does not arise when SDoP is used.
+
+The consequence of (7), (8), and (9) is that the PostScript/PDF output as
+produced by xmlto/fop looks as if it comes from some of the very early attempts
+at text formatting of around 20 years ago. We can only hope that 20 years'
+progress is not going to get lost, and that things will improve in this area.
+My small contribution to this has been to write SDoP, which, though simple and
+"non-standard", does get some of these formatting issues right.
 
 
 LIST OF FILES
@@ -574,7 +651,7 @@ MyStyle.xsl                    Stylesheet for all output
 MyTitleStyle.xsl               Stylesheet for spec title page
 MyTitlepage.templates.xml      Template for creating MyTitleStyle.xsl
 Myhtml.css                     Experimental css stylesheet for HTML output
-PageLabelPDF                   Script to postprocess PDF
+PageLabelPDF                   Script to postprocess xmlto/fop PDF output
 Pre-xml                        Script to preprocess XML
 TidyHTML-filter                Script to tidy up the filter HTML output
 TidyHTML-spec                  Script to tidy up the spec HTML output
@@ -586,4 +663,4 @@ x2man                          Script to make the Exim man page from the XML
 
 
 Philip Hazel
-Last updated: 30 March 2006
+Last updated: 27 March 2007
index f422bdd..d5d9def 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-# $Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/Makefile,v 1.8 2006/04/04 14:03:49 ph10 Exp $
+# $Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/Makefile,v 1.9 2007/04/11 15:26:09 ph10 Exp $
 
 # Make file for Exim documentation from xfpt source.
 
@@ -18,38 +18,63 @@ exim.8:       spec.xml x2man
 
 ############################### FILTER #################################
 
-filter.xml:   filter.xfpt
-             xfpt filter.xfpt
+filter.xml:      filter.xfpt
+                xfpt filter.xfpt
 
-filter-fo.xml: filter.xml Pre-xml
-             ./Pre-xml -bookinfo <filter.xml >filter-fo.xml
+filter-pr.xml:   filter.xml Pre-xml
+                ./Pre-xml -bookinfo <filter.xml >filter-pr.xml
 
 filter-html.xml: filter.xml Pre-xml
-             ./Pre-xml -html <filter.xml >filter-html.xml
+                ./Pre-xml -html <filter.xml >filter-html.xml
 
-filter-txt.xml: filter.xml Pre-xml
-             ./Pre-xml -ascii -html -quoteliteral <filter.xml >filter-txt.xml
+filter-txt.xml:  filter.xml Pre-xml
+                ./Pre-xml -ascii -html -quoteliteral <filter.xml >filter-txt.xml
 
 filter-info.xml: filter.xml Pre-xml
-             ./Pre-xml -ascii -html <filter.xml >filter-info.xml
+                ./Pre-xml -ascii -html <filter.xml >filter-info.xml
 
-filter.fo:    filter-fo.xml MyStyle-filter-fo.xsl MyStyle-fo.xsl MyStyle.xsl
-             /bin/rm -rf filter.fo filter-fo.fo
-             xmlto -x MyStyle-filter-fo.xsl fo filter-fo.xml
-             /bin/mv -f filter-fo.fo filter.fo
+filter.fo:       filter-pr.xml MyStyle-filter-fo.xsl MyStyle-fo.xsl MyStyle.xsl
+                /bin/rm -rf filter.fo filter-pr.fo
+                xmlto -x MyStyle-filter-fo.xsl fo filter-pr.xml
+                /bin/mv -f filter-pr.fo filter.fo
 
 # Do not use pdf2ps from the PDF version; better PS is generated directly.
 
-filter.ps:    filter.fo
-             fop filter.fo -ps filter-tmp.ps
-             mv filter-tmp.ps filter.ps
+###
+### PS/PDF generation using fop
+###
+
+fop-filter.ps:   filter.fo
+                fop filter.fo -ps filter-tmp.ps
+                mv filter-tmp.ps filter.ps
 
 # Do not use ps2pdf from the PS version; better PDF is generated directly. It
 # contains cross links etc.
 
-filter.pdf:   filter.fo PageLabelPDF
-             fop filter.fo -pdf filter-tmp.pdf
-             ./PageLabelPDF 2 <filter-tmp.pdf >filter.pdf
+fop-filter.pdf:  filter.fo PageLabelPDF
+                fop filter.fo -pdf filter-tmp.pdf
+                ./PageLabelPDF 2 <filter-tmp.pdf >filter.pdf
+
+###
+### PS/PDF generation using SDoP
+###
+
+sdop-filter.ps:  filter-pr.xml
+                sdop -o filter.ps filter-pr.xml
+
+sdop-filter.pdf: sdop-filter.ps
+                ps2pdf filter.ps filter.pdf
+
+###
+### PS/PDF default setting
+###
+
+filter.ps:  sdop-filter.ps
+
+filter.pdf: sdop-filter.pdf
+
+###
+###
 
 filter.html:  filter-html.xml TidyHTML-filter MyStyle-nochunk-html.xsl \
                 MyStyle-html.xsl MyStyle.xsl
@@ -80,32 +105,36 @@ filter.info:  filter-info.xml
 
 ################################ SPEC ##################################
 
-spec.xml:     spec.xfpt
-             xfpt spec.xfpt
+spec.xml:      spec.xfpt
+              xfpt spec.xfpt
 
-spec-fo.xml:  spec.xml Pre-xml
-             ./Pre-xml -optbreak <spec.xml >spec-fo.xml
+spec-pr.xml:   spec.xml Pre-xml
+              ./Pre-xml -optbreak <spec.xml >spec-pr.xml
 
 spec-html.xml: spec.xml Pre-xml
-             ./Pre-xml -html -oneindex \
-               <spec.xml >spec-html.xml
+              ./Pre-xml -html -oneindex \
+                <spec.xml >spec-html.xml
 
-spec-txt.xml: spec.xml Pre-xml
-             ./Pre-xml -ascii -html -noindex -quoteliteral \
-               <spec.xml >spec-txt.xml
+spec-txt.xml:  spec.xml Pre-xml
+              ./Pre-xml -ascii -html -noindex -quoteliteral \
+                <spec.xml >spec-txt.xml
 
 spec-info.xml: spec.xml Pre-xml
-             ./Pre-xml -ascii -html -noindex <spec.xml >spec-info.xml
+              ./Pre-xml -ascii -html -noindex <spec.xml >spec-info.xml
+
+spec.fo:       spec-pr.xml MyStyle-spec-fo.xsl MyStyle-fo.xsl MyStyle.xsl \
+               MyTitleStyle.xsl
+              /bin/rm -rf spec.fo spec-pr.fo
+              xmlto -x MyStyle-spec-fo.xsl fo spec-pr.xml
+              /bin/mv -f spec-pr.fo spec.fo
 
-spec.fo:      spec-fo.xml MyStyle-spec-fo.xsl MyStyle-fo.xsl MyStyle.xsl \
-              MyTitleStyle.xsl
-             /bin/rm -rf spec.fo spec-fo.fo
-             xmlto -x MyStyle-spec-fo.xsl fo spec-fo.xml
-             /bin/mv -f spec-fo.fo spec.fo
+###
+### PS/PDF generation using fop
+###
 
 # Do not use pdf2ps from the PDF version; better PS is generated directly.
 
-spec.ps:      spec.fo
+fop-spec.ps:  spec.fo
              FOP_OPTS=-Xmx512m fop spec.fo -ps spec-tmp.ps
              mv spec-tmp.ps spec.ps
 
@@ -113,10 +142,31 @@ spec.ps:      spec.fo
 # contains cross links etc. We post-process it to add page label information
 # so that the page identifiers shown by acroread are the correct page numbers.
 
-spec.pdf:     spec.fo PageLabelPDF
+fop-spec.pdf: spec.fo PageLabelPDF
              FOP_OPTS=-Xmx512m fop spec.fo -pdf spec-tmp.pdf
              ./PageLabelPDF 12 <spec-tmp.pdf >spec.pdf
 
+###
+### PS/PDF generation using SDoP
+###
+
+sdop-spec.ps:  spec-pr.xml
+              sdop -o spec.ps spec-pr.xml
+
+sdop-spec.pdf: sdop-spec.ps
+              ps2pdf spec.ps spec.pdf
+
+###
+### PS/PDF default setting
+###
+
+spec.ps:  sdop-spec.ps
+
+spec.pdf: sdop-spec.pdf
+
+###
+###
+
 spec.html:    spec-html.xml TidyHTML-spec MyStyle-chunk-html.xsl \
                 MyStyle-html.xsl MyStyle.xsl
              /bin/rm -rf spec_html
@@ -149,8 +199,8 @@ spec.info:    spec-info.xml
 test.xml:     test.xfpt
              xfpt test.xfpt
 
-test-fo.xml:  test.xml Pre-xml
-             ./Pre-xml <test.xml >test-fo.xml
+test-pr.xml:  test.xml Pre-xml
+             ./Pre-xml <test.xml >test-pr.xml
 
 test-html.xml: test.xml Pre-xml
              ./Pre-xml -html -oneindex <test.xml >test-html.xml
@@ -162,25 +212,51 @@ test-txt.xml: test.xml Pre-xml
 test-info.xml: test.xml Pre-xml
              ./Pre-xml -ascii -html -noindex <test.xml >test-info.xml
 
-test.fo:      test-fo.xml MyStyle-spec-fo.xsl MyStyle-fo.xsl MyStyle.xsl \
+test.fo:      test-pr.xml MyStyle-spec-fo.xsl MyStyle-fo.xsl MyStyle.xsl \
                 MyTitleStyle.xsl
-             /bin/rm -rf test.fo test-fo.fo
-             xmlto -x MyStyle-spec-fo.xsl fo test-fo.xml
-             /bin/mv -f test-fo.fo test.fo
+             /bin/rm -rf test.fo test-pr.fo
+             xmlto -x MyStyle-spec-fo.xsl fo test-pr.xml
+             /bin/mv -f test-pr.fo test.fo
+
+###
+### PS/PDF generation using fop
+###
 
 # Do not use pdf2ps from the PDF version; better PS is generated directly.
 
-test.ps:      test.fo
+fop-test.ps:  test.fo
              fop test.fo -ps test-tmp.ps
              mv test-tmp.ps test.ps
 
 # Do not use ps2pdf from the PS version; better PDF is generated directly. It
 # contains cross links etc.
 
-test.pdf:     test.fo
+fop-test.pdf: test.fo
              fop test.fo -pdf test-tmp.pdf
              mv test-tmp.pdf test.pdf
 
+###
+### PS/PDF generation using SDoP
+###
+
+sdop-test.ps:  test-pr.xml
+              sdop -o test.ps test-pr.xml
+
+sdop-test.pdf: sdop-test.ps
+              ps2pdf test.ps test.pdf
+
+###
+### PS/PDF default setting
+###
+
+test.ps:  sdop-test.ps
+
+test.pdf: sdop-test.pdf
+
+###
+###
+
+
 test.html:    test-html.xml MyStyle-nochunk-html.xsl MyStyle-html.xsl \
                 MyStyle.xsl
              /bin/rm -rf test.html test-html.html
index 302b84b..b447276 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-$Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/Markup.txt,v 1.4 2006/12/19 12:28:35 ph10 Exp $
+$Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/Markup.txt,v 1.5 2007/04/11 15:26:09 ph10 Exp $
 
 XFPT MARKUP USED IN THE EXIM DOCUMENTATION
 ------------------------------------------
@@ -215,18 +215,20 @@ To create an index entry, include a line like one of these:
 
   .cindex "primary text" "secondary text"
   .oindex "primary text" "secondary text"
+  .vindex "&$variable_name$&"
 
-The first is for the "concept index" and the second is for the "options index".
-The secondary text is of course optional. Not all forms of output distinguish
-between these - sometimes there is just one index. For the concept index, it is
-also possible to set "start" and "end" markers so that the entry lists a range
-of pages. This is how to do that:
+The first is for the "concept index", the second is for the "options index",
+and the third is for the "variables" index. The secondary text is of course
+optional. Not all forms of output distinguish between these - sometimes there
+is just one index. For the concept index, it is also possible to set "start"
+and "end" markers so that the entry lists a range of pages. This is how to do
+that:
 
   .scindex IID "primary text" "secondary text"
   <intervening text, should be several pages>
   .ecindex IID
 
-The IID must be some unique string to tie the entries together.
+The IID must be some unique string that ties the entries together.
 
 The index for the Exim reference manual has a number of "see also" entries.
 These are coded in raw XML at the start of the source file.
@@ -309,12 +311,14 @@ and "Default", so you do not have to supply them. Notice the use of the &!!
 flag to put a dagger after the word "string".
 
 
-CHANGE BARS
+CHANGE BARS (REVISION MARKINGS)
 
 I have not yet found a way of producing change bars in the PostScript and PDF
-versions of the documents. However, it is possible to put a green background
-behind changed text in the HTML version, so the appropriate markup should be
-used in the source. There is a facility in xfpt for setting the "revisionflag"
+versions of the documents when they are generated using the "fop" command.
+However, the revision marks do work when these formats are produced using my
+own "sdop" processor. Also, it is possible to put a green background behind
+changed text in the HTML version, so the appropriate markup should be used in
+the source. There is a facility in xfpt for setting the "revisionflag"
 attribute on appropriate XML elements. There is also a macro called .new which
 packages this up for use in three different ways. One or more large text items
 can be placed between .new and .wen ("wen" is "new" backwards). For example:
@@ -353,6 +357,10 @@ name, with the argument in parentheses. For example:
 The effect of this is to generate a <phrase> XML element with the revisionflag
 attribute set. The .wen macro is not used in this case.
 
+You can also use .new/.wen inside .display and .code sections, and &new() will
+work inside lines in a .display section. It will not work in a .code section,
+because all text is literal.
+
 If you want to mark a whole table as new, .new and .wen can be used to surround
 it as described above. However, current DocBook processors do not seem to
 recognize the "revisionflag" attribute on individual rows and table entries.
@@ -361,8 +369,9 @@ by using an inline macro call. For example:
 
   .row "&new(some text)" "...."
 
-Each such entry must be separately marked. If there are more than one or two,
-it may be easier just to mark the entire table.
+This works as required when the XML is processed by "sdop" rather than "fop" to
+generate PostScript and PDF. Each such entry must be separately marked. If
+there are more than one or two, it may be easier just to mark the entire table.
 
 Philip Hazel
-Last updated: 31 July 2006
+Last updated: 10 April 2007
index 4e606dd..b84d197 100755 (executable)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 #! /usr/bin/perl
 
-# $Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/Pre-xml,v 1.3 2006/02/01 11:01:01 ph10 Exp $
+# $Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/Pre-xml,v 1.4 2007/04/11 15:26:09 ph10 Exp $
 
 # Script to pre-process XML input before processing it for various purposes.
 # Options specify which transformations are to be done. Monospaced literal
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@
 #            newline, the space and newline are removed, because otherwise you
 #            get a blank line in the HTML output.
 #
-# -noindex   Remove the XML to generate a Concept and an Options index.
+# -noindex   Remove the XML that generates indexes.
 # -oneindex  Ditto, but add XML to generate a single index.
 #
 # -optbreak  Insert an optional line break (zero-width space, &#x200B;) after
index 707dbe3..4c56cbd 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-. $Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/filter.xfpt,v 1.4 2006/07/31 13:28:49 ph10 Exp $
+. $Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/filter.xfpt,v 1.5 2007/04/11 15:26:09 ph10 Exp $
 
 . /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . This is the primary source of the document that describes Exim's filtering
 .include stdflags
 .include stdmacs
 .docbook
+
+. /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
+. These lines are processing instructions for the Simple DocBook Processor that
+. Philip Hazel has developed as a less cumbersome way of making PostScript and
+. PDFs than using xmlto and fop. They will be ignored by all other XML
+. processors.
+. /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
+
+.literal xml
+<?sdop
+  foot_right_recto="&chaptertitle;"
+  foot_right_verso="&chaptertitle;"
+  table_warn_soft_overflow="no"
+  toc_chapter_blanks="yes,yes"
+  toc_title="Exim's interfaces to mail filtering"
+?>
+.literal off
+
 .book
 
 . ===========================================================================
 . ===========================================================================
 
 
+. /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
+. /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
+
 . This preliminary stuff creates a <bookinfo> entry in the XML. This is removed
 . when creating the PostScript/PDF output, because we do not want a full-blown
-. title page created for those versions. The stylesheet fudges up a title line
-. to replace the text "Table of contents". However, for the other forms of
-. output, the <bookinfo> element is retained and used.
+. title page created for those versions. When fop is being used to create
+. PS/PDF, the stylesheet fudges up a title line to replace the text "Table of
+. contents". When SDoP is being used, a processing instruction does this job.
+. For the other forms of output, the <bookinfo> element is retained and used.
 
 .literal xml
 <bookinfo>
 </bookinfo>
 .literal off
 
+. /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
+. /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
+
 
 .chapter "Forwarding and filtering in Exim"
 This document describes the user interfaces to Exim's in-built mail filtering
-facilities, and is copyright &copy; University of Cambridge 2006. It
-corresponds to Exim version 4.63.
+facilities, and is copyright &copy; University of Cambridge 2007. It
+corresponds to Exim version 4.67.
 
 
 
@@ -248,11 +273,14 @@ this context as &"the specific implementation of Sieve for Exim"&.
 This chapter does not contain a description of Sieve, since that can be found
 in RFC 3028, which should be read in conjunction with these notes.
 
+.new
 The Exim Sieve implementation offers the core as defined by RFC 3028,
-comparison tests, the &*copy*&, &*envelope*&, &*fileinto*&, and &*vacation*&
-extensions, but not the &*reject*& extension. Exim does not support message
-delivery notifications (MDNs), so adding it just to the Sieve filter (as
-required for &*reject*&) makes little sense.
+comparison tests, the subaddress parameter, the &*copy*&, &*envelope*&,
+&*fileinto*&, &*notify*&, and &*vacation*& extensions, but not the &*reject*&
+extension. Exim does not support message delivery notifications (MDNs), so
+adding it just to the Sieve filter (as required for &*reject*&) makes little
+sense.
+.wen
 
 In order for Sieve to work properly in Exim, the system administrator needs to
 make some adjustments to the Exim configuration. These are described in the
@@ -824,11 +852,11 @@ message to be written to its argument file, provided they are different
 (duplicate &(save)& commands are ignored).
 
 If the file name does not start with a / character, the contents of the
-&$home$& variable are prepended, unless it is empty, &new("or the system
-administrator has disabled this feature.") In conventional configurations, this
+&$home$& variable are prepended, unless it is empty, or the system
+administrator has disabled this feature. In conventional configurations, this
 variable is normally set in a user filter to the user's home directory, but the
 system administrator may set it to some other path. In some configurations,
-&$home$& may be unset, &new("or prepending may be disabled,") in which case a
+&$home$& may be unset, or prepending may be disabled, in which case a
 non-absolute path name may be generated. Such configurations convert this to an
 absolute path when the delivery takes place. In a system filter, &$home$& is
 never set.
index d291413..762ee37 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-. $Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/spec.xfpt,v 1.15 2007/02/26 14:06:33 ph10 Exp $
+. $Cambridge: exim/doc/doc-docbook/spec.xfpt,v 1.16 2007/04/11 15:26:09 ph10 Exp $
 .
 . /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . This is the primary source of the Exim Manual. It is an xfpt document that is
 
 . /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . These lines are processing instructions for the Simple DocBook Processor that
-. Philip Hazel is developing in odd moments as a less cumbersome way of making
-. PostScript and PDFs than using xmlto and fop. They will be ignored by all
-. other XML processors.
+. Philip Hazel has developed as a less cumbersome way of making PostScript and
+. PDFs than using xmlto and fop. They will be ignored by all other XML
+. processors.
 . /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
 .literal xml
 <?sdop
+  foot_right_recto="&chaptertitle; (&chapternumber;)"
+  foot_right_verso="&chaptertitle; (&chapternumber;)"
   toc_chapter_blanks="yes,yes"
   table_warn_soft_overflow="no"
 ?>
 . the <bookinfo> element must also be updated for each new edition.
 . /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
+.set previousversion "4.66"
+.set version "4.67"
+
 .set ACL "access control lists (ACLs)"
-.set previousversion "4.63"
-.set version "4.66"
+.set I   "&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;"
 
 
 . /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
@@ -66,7 +70,7 @@
 
 .macro option
 .oindex "&%$1%&"
-.itable all 0 0 4 8* left 5* center 5* center 6* right
+.itable all 0 0 4 8* left 6* center 6* center 6* right
 .row "&%$1%&" "Use: &'$2'&" "Type: &'$3'&" "Default: &'$4'&"
 .endtable
 .endmacro
 .itable none 0 0 2 $1 left $2 left
 .endmacro
 
-. --- Macros for the concept and option index entries. For a "range" style of
-. --- entry, use .scindex for the start and .ecindex for the end. The first
-. --- argument of .scindex and the only argument of .ecindex must be the ID
-. --- that ties them together.
+. --- A macro that generates .row, but puts &I; at the start of the first
+. --- argument, thus indenting it. Assume a minimum of two arguments, and
+. --- allow up to four arguments, which is as many as we'll ever need.
+
+.macro irow
+.arg 4
+.row "&I;$1" "$2" "$3" "$4"
+.endarg
+.arg -4
+.arg 3
+.row "&I;$1" "$2" "$3"
+.endarg
+.arg -3
+.row "&I;$1" "$2"
+.endarg
+.endarg
+.endmacro
+
+. --- Macros for option, variable, and concept index entries. For a "range"
+. --- style of entry, use .scindex for the start and .ecindex for the end. The
+. --- first argument of .scindex and the only argument of .ecindex must be the
+. --- ID that ties them together.
 
 .macro cindex
 &<indexterm role="concept">&
 &</indexterm>&
 .endmacro
 
+.macro vindex
+&<indexterm role="variable">&
+&<primary>&$1&</primary>&
+.arg 2
+&<secondary>&$2&</secondary>&
+.endarg
+&</indexterm>&
+.endmacro
+
 .macro index
-.echo "** Don't use .index; use .cindex or .oindex"
+.echo "** Don't use .index; use .cindex or .oindex or .vindex"
 .endmacro
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
 <bookinfo>
 <title>Specification of the Exim Mail Transfer Agent</title>
 <titleabbrev>The Exim MTA</titleabbrev>
-<date>08 January 2007</date>
+<date>10 April 2007</date>
 <author><firstname>Philip</firstname><surname>Hazel</surname></author>
 <authorinitials>PH</authorinitials>
 <affiliation><orgname>University of Cambridge Computing Service</orgname></affiliation>
 <address>New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QH, England</address>
 <revhistory><revision>
-  <revnumber>4.66</revnumber>
-  <date>08 January 2007</date>
+  <revnumber>4.67</revnumber>
+  <date>10 April 2007</date>
   <authorinitials>PH</authorinitials>
 </revision></revhistory>
 <copyright><year>2007</year><holder>University of Cambridge</holder></copyright>
 . at the top level, so we have to put the .chapter directive first.
 . /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
-.chapter "Introduction"
+.chapter "Introduction" "CHID1"
 .literal xml
 
-<indexterm role="concept">
+<indexterm role="variable">
   <primary>$1, $2, etc.</primary>
   <see><emphasis>numerical variables</emphasis></see>
 </indexterm>
@@ -324,7 +355,7 @@ systems. I am grateful to them all. The distribution now contains a file called
 contributors.
 
 
-.section "Exim documentation"
+.section "Exim documentation" "SECID1"
 .new
 .cindex "documentation"
 This edition of the Exim specification applies to version &version; of Exim.
@@ -356,9 +387,7 @@ published by O'Reilly, covers Exim 3, and many things have changed in Exim 4.)
 .cindex "Debian" "information sources"
 If you are using a Debian distribution of Exim, you will find information about
 Debian-specific features in the file
-.display
-&_/usr/share/doc/exim4-base/README.Debian_&
-.endd
+&_/usr/share/doc/exim4-base/README.Debian_&.
 The command &(man update-exim.conf)& is another source of Debian-specific
 information.
 
@@ -402,7 +431,7 @@ available in other formats (HTML, PostScript, PDF, and Texinfo). Section
 
 
 
-.section "FTP and web sites"
+.section "FTP and web sites" "SECID2"
 .cindex "web site"
 .cindex "FTP site"
 The primary site for Exim source distributions is currently the University of
@@ -414,25 +443,33 @@ Squared, formerly Planet Online Ltd, whose support I gratefully acknowledge.
 
 .cindex "wiki"
 .cindex "FAQ"
+.new
 As well as Exim distribution tar files, the Exim web site contains a number of
-differently formatted versions of the documentation, including the FAQ in both
-text and HTML formats. The HTML version comes with a keyword-in-context index.
-A recent addition to the online information is the Exim wiki
-(&url(http://www.exim.org/eximwiki/)). We hope that this will make it easier
-for Exim users to contribute examples, tips, and know-how for the benefit of
-others.
+differently formatted versions of the documentation. A recent addition to the
+online information is the Exim wiki (&url(http://www.exim.org/eximwiki/)),
+which contains what used to be a separate FAQ, as well as various other
+examples, tips, and know-how that have been contributed by Exim users.
+
+.cindex Bugzilla
+An Exim Bugzilla exists at &url(http://www.exim.org/bugzilla/). You can use
+this to report bugs, and also to add items to the wish list. Please search
+first to check that you are not duplicating a previous entry.
+.wen
 
 
 
-.section "Mailing lists"
+.section "Mailing lists" "SECID3"
 .cindex "mailing lists" "for Exim users"
-The following are the three main Exim mailing lists:
+.new
+The following Exim mailing lists exist:
 
 .table2 140pt
-.row &'exim-users@exim.org'&      "general discussion list"
-.row &'exim-dev@exim.org'&        "discussion of bugs, enhancements, etc."
-.row &'exim-announce@exim.org'&   "moderated, low volume announcements list"
+.row &'exim-users@exim.org'&      "General discussion list"
+.row &'exim-dev@exim.org'&        "Discussion of bugs, enhancements, etc."
+.row &'exim-announce@exim.org'&   "Moderated, low volume announcements list"
+.row &'exim-future@exim.org'&     "Discussion of long-term development"
 .endtable
+.wen
 
 You can subscribe to these lists, change your existing subscriptions, and view
 or search the archives via the mailing lists link on the Exim home page.
@@ -446,7 +483,7 @@ via this web page:
 Please ask Debian-specific questions on this list and not on the general Exim
 lists.
 
-.section "Exim training"
+.section "Exim training" "SECID4"
 .cindex "training courses"
 From time to time (approximately annually at the time of writing), training
 courses are run by the author of Exim in Cambridge, UK. Details of any
@@ -454,7 +491,7 @@ forthcoming courses can be found on the web site
 &url(http://www-tus.csx.cam.ac.uk/courses/exim/).
 
 
-.section "Bug reports"
+.section "Bug reports" "SECID5"
 .cindex "bug reports"
 .cindex "reporting bugs"
 Reports of obvious bugs should be emailed to &'bugs@exim.org'&. However, if you
@@ -517,37 +554,9 @@ inside the &_exim4_& directory of the FTP site:
 .endd
 These tar files contain only the &_doc_& directory, not the complete
 distribution, and are also available in &_.bz2_& as well as &_.gz_& forms.
-.cindex "FAQ"
-The FAQ is available for downloading in two different formats in these files:
-.display
-&_exim4/FAQ.txt.gz_&
-&_exim4/FAQ.html.tar.gz_&
-.endd
-The first of these is a single ASCII file that can be searched with a text
-editor. The second is a directory of HTML files, normally accessed by starting
-at &_index.html_&. The HTML version of the FAQ (which is also included in the
-HTML documentation tarbundle) includes a keyword-in-context index, which is
-often the most convenient way of finding your way around.
-
 
-.section "Wish list"
-.cindex "wish list"
-A wish list is maintained, containing ideas for new features that have been
-submitted. This used to be a single file that from time to time was exported to
-the ftp site into the file &_exim4/WishList_&. However, it has now been
-imported into Exim's Bugzilla data.
 
-
-.section "Contributed material"
-.cindex "contributed material"
-At the ftp site, there is a directory called &_Contrib_& that contains
-miscellaneous files contributed to the Exim community by Exim users. There is
-also a collection of contributed configuration examples in
-&_exim4/config.samples.tar.gz_&. These samples are referenced from the FAQ.
-
-
-
-.section "Limitations"
+.section "Limitations" "SECID6"
 .ilist
 .cindex "limitations of Exim"
 .cindex "bang paths" "not handled by Exim"
@@ -587,7 +596,7 @@ a number of common scanners are provided.
 .endlist
 
 
-.section "Run time configuration"
+.section "Run time configuration" "SECID7"
 Exim's run time configuration is held in a single text file that is divided
 into a number of sections. The entries in this file consist of keywords and
 values, in the style of Smail 3 configuration files. A default configuration
@@ -595,7 +604,7 @@ file which is suitable for simple online installations is provided in the
 distribution, and is described in chapter &<<CHAPdefconfil>>& below.
 
 
-.section "Calling interface"
+.section "Calling interface" "SECID8"
 .cindex "Sendmail compatibility" "command line interface"
 Like many MTAs, Exim has adopted the Sendmail command line interface so that it
 can be a straight replacement for &_/usr/lib/sendmail_& or
@@ -615,7 +624,7 @@ interface to Exim's command line administration options.
 
 
 
-.section "Terminology"
+.section "Terminology" "SECID9"
 .cindex "terminology definitions"
 .cindex "body of message" "definition of"
 The &'body'& of a message is the actual data that the sender wants to transmit.
@@ -645,7 +654,7 @@ The word &'domain'& is sometimes used to mean all but the first component of a
 host's name. It is &'not'& used in that sense here, where it normally refers to
 the part of an email address following the @ sign.
 
-.cindex "envelope" "definition of"
+.cindex "envelopedefinition of"
 .cindex "sender" "definition of"
 A message in transit has an associated &'envelope'&, as well as a header and a
 body. The envelope contains a sender address (to which bounce messages should
@@ -654,7 +663,7 @@ sender or the recipients of a message usually mean the addresses in the
 envelope. An MTA uses these addresses for delivery, and for returning bounce
 messages, not the addresses that appear in the header lines.
 
-.cindex "message header" "definition of"
+.cindex "message" "header, definition of"
 .cindex "header section" "definition of"
 The &'header'& of a message is the first part of a message's text, consisting
 of a number of lines, each of which has a name such as &'From:'&, &'To:'&,
@@ -669,7 +678,7 @@ part of an email address that precedes the @ sign. The part that follows the
 @ sign is called the &'domain'& or &'mail domain'&.
 
 .cindex "local delivery" "definition of"
-.cindex "remote delivery" "definition of"
+.cindex "remote deliverydefinition of"
 The terms &'local delivery'& and &'remote delivery'& are used to distinguish
 delivery to a file or a pipe on the local host from delivery by SMTP over
 TCP/IP to another host. As far as Exim is concerned, all hosts other than the
@@ -706,7 +715,7 @@ the Exim documentation, &"spool"& is always used in the first sense.
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
-.chapter "Incorporated code"
+.chapter "Incorporated code" "CHID2"
 .cindex "incorporated code"
 .cindex "regular expressions" "library"
 .cindex "PCRE"
@@ -718,9 +727,10 @@ monitor using the freely-distributable PCRE library, copyright &copy;
 University of Cambridge. The source is distributed in the directory
 &_src/pcre_&. However, this is a cut-down version of PCRE. If you want to use
 the PCRE library in other programs, you should obtain and install the full
-version from &url(ftp://ftp.csx.cam.ac.uk/pub/software/programming/pcre).
+version of the library from
+&url(ftp://ftp.csx.cam.ac.uk/pub/software/programming/pcre).
 .next
-.cindex "cdb" "acknowledgement"
+.cindex "cdb" "acknowledgment"
 Support for the cdb (Constant DataBase) lookup method is provided by code
 contributed by Nigel Metheringham of (at the time he contributed it) Planet
 Online Ltd. The implementation is completely contained within the code of Exim.
@@ -737,9 +747,9 @@ version.
 
 This code implements Dan Bernstein's Constant DataBase (cdb) spec. Information,
 the spec and sample code for cdb can be obtained from
-&url(http://www.pobox.com/~djb/cdb.html). This implementation borrows some
-code from Dan Bernstein's implementation (which has no license restrictions
-applied to it).
+&url(http://www.pobox.com/~djb/cdb.html). This implementation borrows
+some code from Dan Bernstein's implementation (which has no license
+restrictions applied to it).
 .endblockquote
 .next
 .cindex "SPA authentication"
@@ -804,7 +814,7 @@ OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.
 .endblockquote
 
 .next
-.cindex "Exim monitor" "acknowledgement"
+.cindex "Exim monitor" "acknowledgment"
 .cindex "X-windows"
 .cindex "Athena"
 The Exim Monitor program, which is an X-Window application, includes
@@ -838,7 +848,7 @@ SOFTWARE.
 .next
 Many people have contributed code fragments, some large, some small, that were
 not covered by any specific licence requirements. It is assumed that the
-contributors are happy to see their code incoporated into Exim under the GPL.
+contributors are happy to see their code incorporated into Exim under the GPL.
 .endlist
 
 
@@ -848,11 +858,11 @@ contributors are happy to see their code incoporated into Exim under the GPL.
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
-.chapter "How Exim receives and delivers mail" "" &&&
+.chapter "How Exim receives and delivers mail" "CHID11" &&&
          "Receiving and delivering mail"
 
 
-.section "Overall philosophy"
+.section "Overall philosophy" "SECID10"
 .cindex "design philosophy"
 Exim is designed to work efficiently on systems that are permanently connected
 to the Internet and are handling a general mix of mail. In such circumstances,
@@ -862,7 +872,7 @@ it does try to send several messages in a single SMTP connection after a host
 has been down, and it also maintains per-host retry information.
 
 
-.section "Policy control"
+.section "Policy control" "SECID11"
 .cindex "policy control" "overview"
 Policy controls are now an important feature of MTAs that are connected to the
 Internet. Perhaps their most important job is to stop MTAs being abused as
@@ -891,7 +901,7 @@ spam scanning software. The result of such a scan is passed back to the ACL,
 which can then use it to decide what to do with the message.
 .next
 When a message has been received, either from a remote host or from the local
-host, but before the final acknowledgement has been sent, a locally supplied C
+host, but before the final acknowledgment has been sent, a locally supplied C
 function called &[local_scan()]& can be run to inspect the message and decide
 whether to accept it or not (see chapter &<<CHAPlocalscan>>&). If the message
 is accepted, the list of recipients can be modified by the function.
@@ -907,7 +917,7 @@ runs at the start of every delivery process.
 
 
 
-.section "User filters"
+.section "User filters" "SECID12"
 .cindex "filter" "introduction"
 .cindex "Sieve filter"
 In a conventional Exim configuration, users are able to run private filters by
@@ -984,7 +994,7 @@ pid, it is guaranteed that the time will be different. In most cases, the clock
 will already have ticked while the message was being received.
 
 
-.section "Receiving mail"
+.section "Receiving mail" "SECID13"
 .cindex "receiving mail"
 .cindex "message" "reception"
 The only way Exim can receive mail from another host is using SMTP over
@@ -1017,7 +1027,7 @@ in the same way as connections from other hosts.
 .endlist
 
 
-.cindex "message sender" "constructed by Exim"
+.cindex "message senderconstructed by Exim"
 .cindex "sender" "constructed by Exim"
 In the three cases that do not involve TCP/IP, the sender address is
 constructed from the login name of the user that called Exim and a default
@@ -1050,7 +1060,7 @@ message is received.
 
 
 
-.section "Handling an incoming message"
+.section "Handling an incoming message" "SECID14"
 .cindex "spool directory" "files that hold a message"
 .cindex "file" "how a message is held"
 When Exim accepts a message, it writes two files in its spool directory. The
@@ -1091,7 +1101,7 @@ delivered (see chapters &<<CHAProutergeneric>>& and
 
 
 
-.section "Life of a message"
+.section "Life of a message" "SECID15"
 .cindex "message" "life of"
 .cindex "message" "frozen"
 A message remains in the spool directory until it is completely delivered to
@@ -1216,7 +1226,7 @@ the address is bounced.
 
 
 
-.section "Processing an address for verification"
+.section "Processing an address for verification" "SECID16"
 .cindex "router" "for verification"
 .cindex "verifying address" "overview"
 As well as being used to decide how to deliver to an address, Exim's routers
@@ -1302,9 +1312,9 @@ when the relevant conditions are met. The &(redirect)& router has a &"fail"&
 facility for this purpose.
 
 
-.section "Duplicate addresses"
+.section "Duplicate addresses" "SECID17"
 .cindex "case of local parts"
-.cindex "address duplicate" "discarding"
+.cindex "address duplicatediscarding"
 .cindex "duplicate addresses"
 Once routing is complete, Exim scans the addresses that are assigned to local
 and remote transports, and discards any duplicates that it finds. During this
@@ -1315,7 +1325,7 @@ routed addresses are shown.
 
 
 .section "Router preconditions" "SECTrouprecon"
-.cindex "router preconditions" "order of processing"
+.cindex "router" "preconditions, order of processing"
 .cindex "preconditions" "order of processing"
 The preconditions that are tested for each router are listed below, in the
 order in which they are tested. The individual configuration options are
@@ -1353,9 +1363,9 @@ check an address given in the SMTP EXPN command (see the &%expn%& option).
 If the &%domains%& option is set, the domain of the address must be in the set
 of domains that it defines.
 .next
-.cindex "&$local_part_prefix$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part_suffix$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_prefix$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_suffix$&"
 If the &%local_parts%& option is set, the local part of the address must be in
 the set of local parts that it defines. If &%local_part_prefix%& or
 &%local_part_suffix%& is in use, the prefix or suffix is removed from the local
@@ -1364,9 +1374,9 @@ that include affixes, you can do so by using a &%condition%& option (see below)
 that uses the variables &$local_part$&, &$local_part_prefix$&, and
 &$local_part_suffix$& as necessary.
 .next
-.cindex "&$local_user_uid$&"
-.cindex "&$local_user_gid$&"
-.cindex "&$home$&"
+.vindex "&$local_user_uid$&"
+.vindex "&$local_user_gid$&"
+.vindex "&$home$&"
 If the &%check_local_user%& option is set, the local part must be the name of
 an account on the local host. If this check succeeds, the uid and gid of the
 local user are placed in &$local_user_uid$& and &$local_user_gid$& and the
@@ -1402,7 +1412,7 @@ example, &_.procmailrc_&).
 
 
 
-.section "Delivery in detail"
+.section "Delivery in detail" "SECID18"
 .cindex "delivery" "in detail"
 When a message is to be delivered, the sequence of events is as follows:
 
@@ -1494,7 +1504,7 @@ deleted, though the message log can optionally be preserved if required.
 
 
 
-.section "Retry mechanism"
+.section "Retry mechanism" "SECID19"
 .cindex "delivery" "retry mechanism"
 .cindex "retry" "description of mechanism"
 .cindex "queue runner"
@@ -1517,7 +1527,7 @@ as permanent.
 
 
 
-.section "Temporary delivery failure"
+.section "Temporary delivery failure" "SECID20"
 .cindex "delivery" "temporary failure"
 There are many reasons why a message may not be immediately deliverable to a
 particular address. Failure to connect to a remote machine (because it, or the
@@ -1543,7 +1553,7 @@ one connection.
 
 
 
-.section "Permanent delivery failure"
+.section "Permanent delivery failure" "SECID21"
 .cindex "delivery" "permanent failure"
 .cindex "bounce message" "when generated"
 When a message cannot be delivered to some or all of its intended recipients, a
@@ -1571,7 +1581,7 @@ of the list.
 
 
 
-.section "Failures to deliver bounce messages"
+.section "Failures to deliver bounce messages" "SECID22"
 .cindex "bounce message" "failure to deliver"
 If a bounce message (either locally generated or received from a remote host)
 itself suffers a permanent delivery failure, the message is left on the queue,
@@ -1587,35 +1597,36 @@ for only a short time (see &%timeout_frozen_after%& and
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
-.chapter "Building and installing Exim"
+.chapter "Building and installing Exim" "CHID3"
 .scindex IIDbuex "building Exim"
 
-.section "Unpacking"
-Exim is distributed as a gzipped or bzipped tar file which, when upacked,
+.section "Unpacking" "SECID23"
+Exim is distributed as a gzipped or bzipped tar file which, when unpacked,
 creates a directory with the name of the current release (for example,
 &_exim-&version;_&) into which the following files are placed:
 
 .table2 140pt
-.row &_ACKNOWLEDGMENTS_& "contains some acknowledgments"
-.row &_CHANGES_&         "contains a reference to where changes are documented"
-.row &_LICENCE_&         "the GNU General Public Licence"
-.row &_Makefile_&        "top-level make file"
-.row &_NOTICE_&          "conditions for the use of Exim"
-.row &_README_&          "list of files, directories and simple build &&&
-                          instructions"
+.irow &_ACKNOWLEDGMENTS_& "contains some acknowledgments"
+.irow &_CHANGES_&         "contains a reference to where changes are &&&
+  documented"
+.irow &_LICENCE_&         "the GNU General Public Licence"
+.irow &_Makefile_&        "top-level make file"
+.irow &_NOTICE_&          "conditions for the use of Exim"
+.irow &_README_&          "list of files, directories and simple build &&&
+  instructions"
 .endtable
 
 Other files whose names begin with &_README_& may also be present. The
 following subdirectories are created:
 
 .table2 140pt
-.row &_Local_&           "an empty directory for local configuration files"
-.row &_OS_&              "OS-specific files"
-.row &_doc_&             "documentation files"
-.row &_exim_monitor_&    "source files for the Exim monitor"
-.row &_scripts_&         "scripts used in the build process"
-.row &_src_&             "remaining source files"
-.row &_util_&            "independent utilities"
+.irow &_Local_&           "an empty directory for local configuration files"
+.irow &_OS_&              "OS-specific files"
+.irow &_doc_&             "documentation files"
+.irow &_exim_monitor_&    "source files for the Exim monitor"
+.irow &_scripts_&         "scripts used in the build process"
+.irow &_src_&             "remaining source files"
+.irow &_util_&            "independent utilities"
 .endtable
 
 The main utility programs are contained in the &_src_& directory, and are built
@@ -1623,7 +1634,7 @@ with the Exim binary. The &_util_& directory contains a few optional scripts
 that may be useful to some sites.
 
 
-.section "Multiple machine architectures and operating systems"
+.section "Multiple machine architectures and operating systems" "SECID24"
 .cindex "building Exim" "multiple OS/architectures"
 The building process for Exim is arranged to make it easy to build binaries for
 a number of different architectures and operating systems from the same set of
@@ -1646,9 +1657,9 @@ databases. Unfortunately, there are a number of DBM libraries in existence, and
 different operating systems often have different ones installed.
 
 .cindex "Solaris" "DBM library for"
-.cindex "IRIX" "DBM library for"
-.cindex "BSD" "DBM library for"
-.cindex "Linux" "DBM library for"
+.cindex "IRIXDBM library for"
+.cindex "BSDDBM library for"
+.cindex "LinuxDBM library for"
 If you are using Solaris, IRIX, one of the modern BSD systems, or a modern
 Linux distribution, the DBM configuration should happen automatically, and you
 may be able to ignore this section. Otherwise, you may have to learn more than
@@ -1660,7 +1671,7 @@ via the &'ndbm'& interface, and this is what Exim expects by default. Free
 versions of Unix seem to vary in what they contain as standard. In particular,
 some early versions of Linux have no default DBM library, and different
 distributors have chosen to bundle different libraries with their packaged
-versions. However, the more recent releases seem to have standardised on the
+versions. However, the more recent releases seem to have standardized on the
 Berkeley DB library.
 
 Different DBM libraries have different conventions for naming the files they
@@ -1739,7 +1750,7 @@ file &_doc/dbm.discuss.txt_& in the Exim distribution.
 
 
 
-.section "Pre-building configuration"
+.section "Pre-building configuration" "SECID25"
 .cindex "building Exim" "pre-building configuration"
 .cindex "configuration for building Exim"
 .cindex "&_Local/Makefile_&"
@@ -1795,7 +1806,7 @@ do this.
 
 
 
-.section "Support for iconv()"
+.section "Support for iconv()" "SECID26"
 .cindex "&[iconv()]& support"
 .cindex "RFC 2047"
 The contents of header lines in messages may be encoded according to the rules
@@ -1868,8 +1879,8 @@ given in chapter &<<CHAPTLS>>&.
 
 
 
-.section "Use of tcpwrappers"
-.cindex "tcpwrappers" "building Exim to support"
+.section "Use of tcpwrappers" "SECID27"
+.cindex "tcpwrappersbuilding Exim to support"
 .cindex "USE_TCP_WRAPPERS"
 Exim can be linked with the &'tcpwrappers'& library in order to check incoming
 SMTP calls using the &'tcpwrappers'& control files. This may be a convenient
@@ -1897,7 +1908,7 @@ further details.
 
 
 
-.section "Including support for IPv6"
+.section "Including support for IPv6" "SECID28"
 .cindex "IPv6" "including support for"
 Exim contains code for use on systems that have IPv6 support. Setting
 &`HAVE_IPV6=YES`& in &_Local/Makefile_& causes the IPv6 code to be included;
@@ -1906,7 +1917,7 @@ where the IPv6 support is not fully integrated into the normal include and
 library files.
 
 Two different types of DNS record for handling IPv6 addresses have been
-defined. AAAA records (analagous to A records for IPv4) are in use, and are
+defined. AAAA records (analogous to A records for IPv4) are in use, and are
 currently seen as the mainstream. Another record type called A6 was proposed
 as better than AAAA because it had more flexibility. However, it was felt to be
 over-complex, and its status was reduced to &"experimental"&. It is not known
@@ -1916,7 +1927,7 @@ support has not been tested for some time.
 
 
 
-.section "The building process"
+.section "The building process" "SECID29"
 .cindex "build directory"
 Once &_Local/Makefile_& (and &_Local/eximon.conf_&, if required) have been
 created, run &'make'& at the top level. It determines the architecture and
@@ -1944,7 +1955,7 @@ FAQ, where some common problems are covered.
 
 
 
-.section 'Output from &"make"&'
+.section 'Output from &"make"&' "SECID283"
 The output produced by the &'make'& process for compile lines is often very
 unreadable, because these lines can be very long. For this reason, the normal
 output is suppressed by default, and instead output similar to that which
@@ -1961,7 +1972,7 @@ given in addition to the short output.
 
 
 .section "Overriding build-time options for Exim" "SECToverride"
-.cindex "build-time options" "overriding"
+.cindex "build-time optionsoverriding"
 The main make file that is created at the beginning of the building process
 consists of the concatenation of a number of files which set configuration
 values, followed by a fixed set of &'make'& instructions. If a value is set
@@ -2062,7 +2073,7 @@ EXIM_PERL=perl.o
 must be defined in &_Local/Makefile_&. Details of this facility are given in
 chapter &<<CHAPperl>>&.
 
-.cindex "X11 libraries" "location of"
+.cindex "X11 librarieslocation of"
 The location of the X11 libraries is something that varies a lot between
 operating systems, and there may be different versions of X11 to cope
 with. Exim itself makes no use of X11, but if you are compiling the Exim
@@ -2104,7 +2115,7 @@ necessary to touch the associated non-optional file (that is,
 &_Local/Makefile_& or &_Local/eximon.conf_&) before rebuilding.
 
 
-.section "OS-specific header files"
+.section "OS-specific header files" "SECID30"
 .cindex "&_os.h_&"
 .cindex "building Exim" "OS-specific C header files"
 The &_OS_& directory contains a number of files with names of the form
@@ -2115,8 +2126,8 @@ are porting Exim to a new operating system.
 
 
 
-.section "Overriding build-time options for the monitor"
-.cindex "building Eximon" "overriding default options"
+.section "Overriding build-time options for the monitor" "SECID31"
+.cindex "building Eximon"
 A similar process is used for overriding things when building the Exim monitor,
 where the files that are involved are
 .display
@@ -2137,7 +2148,7 @@ LOG_DEPTH at run time.
 .ecindex IIDbuex
 
 
-.section "Installing Exim binaries and scripts"
+.section "Installing Exim binaries and scripts" "SECID32"
 .cindex "installing Exim"
 .cindex "BIN_DIRECTORY"
 The command &`make install`& runs the &(exim_install)& script with no
@@ -2262,7 +2273,7 @@ install`& automatically builds the info files and installs them.
 
 
 
-.section "Setting up the spool directory"
+.section "Setting up the spool directory" "SECID33"
 .cindex "spool directory" "creating"
 When it starts up, Exim tries to create its spool directory if it does not
 exist. The Exim uid and gid are used for the owner and group of the spool
@@ -2272,7 +2283,7 @@ necessary.
 
 
 
-.section "Testing"
+.section "Testing" "SECID34"
 .cindex "testing" "installation"
 Having installed Exim, you can check that the run time configuration file is
 syntactically valid by running the following command, which assumes that the
@@ -2353,7 +2364,7 @@ that Exim uses can be altered, in order to keep it entirely clear of the
 production version.
 
 
-.section "Replacing another MTA with Exim"
+.section "Replacing another MTA with Exim" "SECID35"
 .cindex "replacing another MTA"
 Building and installing Exim for the first time does not of itself put it in
 general use. The name by which the system's MTA is called by mail user agents
@@ -2367,7 +2378,7 @@ a symbolic link to the &'exim'& binary. It is a good idea to remove any setuid
 privilege and executable status from the old MTA. It is then necessary to stop
 and restart the mailer daemon, if one is running.
 
-.cindex "FreeBSD" "MTA indirection"
+.cindex "FreeBSDMTA indirection"
 .cindex "&_/etc/mail/mailer.conf_&"
 Some operating systems have introduced alternative ways of switching MTAs. For
 example, if you are running FreeBSD, you need to edit the file
@@ -2393,7 +2404,7 @@ use of Exim's filtering capabilities, you should make the document entitled
 
 
 
-.section "Upgrading Exim"
+.section "Upgrading Exim" "SECID36"
 .cindex "upgrading Exim"
 If you are already running Exim on your host, building and installing a new
 version automatically makes it available to MUAs, or any other programs that
@@ -2406,7 +2417,7 @@ configuration file.
 
 
 
-.section "Stopping the Exim daemon on Solaris"
+.section "Stopping the Exim daemon on Solaris" "SECID37"
 .cindex "Solaris" "stopping Exim on"
 The standard command for stopping the mailer daemon on Solaris is
 .code
@@ -2443,7 +2454,7 @@ combinations of options do not make sense, and provoke an error if used.
 The form of the arguments depends on which options are set.
 
 
-.section "Setting options by program name"
+.section "Setting options by program name" "SECID38"
 .cindex "&'mailq'&"
 If Exim is called under the name &'mailq'&, it behaves as if the option &%-bp%&
 were present before any other options.
@@ -2488,7 +2499,7 @@ EXIM_GROUP in &_Local/Makefile_& or set by the &%exim_user%& and
 &%exim_group%& options. These do not necessarily have to use the name &"exim"&.
 
 .ilist
-.cindex "trusted user" "definition of"
+.cindex "trusted users" "definition of"
 .cindex "user" "trusted definition of"
 The trusted users are root, the Exim user, any user listed in the
 &%trusted_users%& configuration option, and any user whose current group or any
@@ -2546,7 +2557,7 @@ getting root. There is further discussion of this issue at the start of chapter
 
 
 
-.section "Command line options"
+.section "Command line options" "SECID39"
 Exim's command line options are described in alphabetical order below. If none
 of the options that specifies a specific action (such as starting the daemon or
 a queue runner, or testing an address, or receiving a message in a specific
@@ -2590,7 +2601,7 @@ clean; it ignores this option.
 .vitem &%-bd%&
 .oindex "&%-bd%&"
 .cindex "daemon"
-.cindex "SMTP listener"
+.cindex "SMTP" "listener"
 .cindex "queue runner"
 This option runs Exim as a daemon, awaiting incoming SMTP connections. Usually
 the &%-bd%& option is combined with the &%-q%&<&'time'&> option, to specify
@@ -2655,14 +2666,13 @@ continuation lines is ignored. Each argument or data line is passed through the
 string expansion mechanism, and the result is output. Variable values from the
 configuration file (for example, &$qualify_domain$&) are available, but no
 message-specific values (such as &$sender_domain$&) are set, because no message
-is being processed &new("(but see &%-bem%& and &%-Mset%&)").
+is being processed (but see &%-bem%& and &%-Mset%&).
 
 &*Note*&: If you use this mechanism to test lookups, and you change the data
 files or databases you are using, you must exit and restart Exim before trying
 the same lookup again. Otherwise, because each Exim process caches the results
 of lookups, you will just get the same result as before.
 
-.new
 .vitem &%-bem%&&~<&'filename'&>
 .oindex "&%-bem%&"
 .cindex "testing" "string expansion"
@@ -2680,7 +2690,6 @@ recipients are read from the headers in the normal way, and are shown in the
 &$recipients$& variable. Note that recipients cannot be given on the command
 line, because further arguments are taken as strings to expand (just like
 &%-be%&).
-.wen
 
 .vitem &%-bF%&&~<&'filename'&>
 .oindex "&%-bF%&"
@@ -2729,7 +2738,7 @@ separate document entitled &'Exim's interfaces to mail filtering'&.
 When testing a filter file,
 .cindex "&""From""& line"
 .cindex "envelope sender"
-.cindex "&%-f%& option" "for filter testing"
+.oindex "&%-f%&" "for filter testing"
 the envelope sender can be set by the &%-f%& option,
 or by a &"From&~"& line at the start of the test message. Various parameters
 that would normally be taken from the envelope recipient address of the message
@@ -2738,7 +2747,7 @@ options).
 
 .vitem &%-bfd%&&~<&'domain'&>
 .oindex "&%-bfd%&"
-.cindex "&$qualify_domain$&"
+.vindex "&$qualify_domain$&"
 This sets the domain of the recipient address when a filter file is being
 tested by means of the &%-bf%& option. The default is the value of
 &$qualify_domain$&.
@@ -2813,7 +2822,8 @@ acceptable or not. See section &<<SECTcheckaccess>>&.
 
 .new
 Features such as authentication and encryption, where the client input is not
-plain text, are most easily tested using specialized SMTP test programs such as
+plain text, cannot easily be tested with &%-bh%&. Instead, you should use a
+specialized SMTP test program such as
 &url(http://jetmore.org/john/code/#swaks,swaks).
 .wen
 
@@ -2882,16 +2892,15 @@ authoritative specification of the format of this line. Exim recognizes it by
 matching against the regular expression defined by the &%uucp_from_pattern%&
 option, which can be changed if necessary.
 
-The
-.cindex "&%-f%& option" "overriding &""From""& line"
-specified sender is treated as if it were given as the argument to the
+.oindex "&%-f%&" "overriding &""From""& line"
+The specified sender is treated as if it were given as the argument to the
 &%-f%& option, but if a &%-f%& option is also present, its argument is used in
 preference to the address taken from the message. The caller of Exim must be a
 trusted user for the sender of a message to be set in this way.
 
 .vitem &%-bnq%&
 .oindex "&%-bnq%&"
-.cindex "address qualification" "suppressing"
+.cindex "address qualificationsuppressing"
 By default, Exim automatically qualifies unqualified addresses (those
 without domains) that appear in messages that are submitted locally (that
 is, not over TCP/IP). This qualification applies both to addresses in
@@ -2913,7 +2922,7 @@ unqualified addresses in header lines are left alone.
 
 .vitem &%-bP%&
 .oindex "&%-bP%&"
-.cindex "configuration options" "extracting"
+.cindex "configuration optionsextracting"
 .cindex "options" "configuration &-- extracting"
 If this option is given with no arguments, it causes the values of all Exim's
 main configuration options to be written to the standard output. The values
@@ -3145,10 +3154,10 @@ the listening daemon.
 .cindex "testing" "addresses"
 .cindex "address" "testing"
 This option runs Exim in address testing mode, in which each argument is taken
-as an address to be tested for deliverability. The results are written to the
-standard output. If a test fails, and the caller is not an admin user, no
-details of the failure are output, because these might contain sensitive
-information such as usernames and passwords for database lookups.
+as a &new(recipient) address to be tested for deliverability. The results are
+written to the standard output. If a test fails, and the caller is not an admin
+user, no details of the failure are output, because these might contain
+sensitive information such as usernames and passwords for database lookups.
 
 If no arguments are given, Exim runs in an interactive manner, prompting with a
 right angle bracket for addresses to be tested.
@@ -3164,9 +3173,8 @@ written to the standard output. However, any router that has
 genuine routing tests if your first router passes everything to a scanner
 program.
 
-The
 .cindex "return code" "for &%-bt%&"
-return code is 2 if any address failed outright; it is 1 if no address
+The return code is 2 if any address failed outright; it is 1 if no address
 failed outright but at least one could not be resolved for some reason. Return
 code 0 is given only when all addresses succeed.
 
@@ -3179,7 +3187,7 @@ always shown.
 &*Warning*&: &%-bt%& can only do relatively simple testing. If any of the
 routers in the configuration makes any tests on the sender address of a
 message,
-.cindex "&%-f%& option" "for address testing"
+.oindex "&%-f%&" "for address testing"
 you can use the &%-f%& option to set an appropriate sender when running
 &%-bt%& tests. Without it, the sender is assumed to be the calling user at the
 default qualifying domain. However, if you have set up (for example) routers
@@ -3189,7 +3197,7 @@ doing such tests.
 
 .vitem &%-bV%&
 .oindex "&%-bV%&"
-.cindex "version number of Exim" "verifying"
+.cindex "version number of Exim"
 This option causes Exim to write the current version number, compilation
 number, and compilation date of the &'exim'& binary to the standard output.
 It also lists the DBM library this is being used, the optional modules (such as
@@ -3209,11 +3217,11 @@ dynamic testing facilities.
 .cindex "verifying address" "using &%-bv%&"
 .cindex "address" "verification"
 This option runs Exim in address verification mode, in which each argument is
-taken as an address to be verified by the routers. (This does not involve any
-verification callouts). During normal operation, verification happens mostly as
-a consequence processing a &%verify%& condition in an ACL (see chapter
-&<<CHAPACL>>&). If you want to test an entire ACL, possibly including callouts,
-see the &%-bh%& and &%-bhc%& options.
+taken as a &new(recipient) address to be verified by the routers. (This does
+not involve any verification callouts). During normal operation, verification
+happens mostly as a consequence processing a &%verify%& condition in an ACL
+(see chapter &<<CHAPACL>>&). If you want to test an entire ACL, possibly
+including callouts, see the &%-bh%& and &%-bhc%& options.
 
 If verification fails, and the caller is not an admin user, no details of the
 failure are output, because these might contain sensitive information such as
@@ -3232,7 +3240,6 @@ router that has &%fail_verify%& set, verification fails. The address is
 verified as a recipient if &%-bv%& is used; to test verification for a sender
 address, &%-bvs%& should be used.
 
-.new
 If the &%-v%& option is not set, the output consists of a single line for each
 address, stating whether it was verified or not, and giving a reason in the
 latter case. Without &%-v%&, generating more than one address by redirection
@@ -3244,7 +3251,6 @@ to succeed.
 When &%-v%& is set, more details are given of how the address has been handled,
 and in the case of address redirection, all the generated addresses are also
 considered. Verification may succeed for some and fail for others.
-.wen
 
 The
 .cindex "return code" "for &%-bv%&"
@@ -3346,9 +3352,9 @@ exim '-D ABC = something' ...
 This option causes debugging information to be written to the standard
 error stream. It is restricted to admin users because debugging output may show
 database queries that contain password information. Also, the details of users'
-filter files should be protected. &new("If a non-admin user uses &%-d%&, Exim
+filter files should be protected. If a non-admin user uses &%-d%&, Exim
 writes an error message to the standard error stream and exits with a non-zero
-return code.")
+return code.
 
 When &%-d%& is used, &%-v%& is assumed. If &%-d%& is given on its own, a lot of
 standard debugging data is output. This can be reduced, or increased to include
@@ -3399,8 +3405,8 @@ is included, an awful lot of output that is very rarely of interest is
 generated, so it now has to be explicitly requested. However, &`-all`& does
 turn everything off.
 
-.cindex "resolver" "debugging output"
-.cindex "DNS resolver" "debugging output"
+.cindex "resolverdebugging output"
+.cindex "DNS resolverdebugging output"
 The &`resolver`& option produces output only if the DNS resolver was compiled
 with DEBUG enabled. This is not the case in some operating systems. Also,
 unfortunately, debugging output from the DNS resolver is written to stdout
@@ -3465,7 +3471,7 @@ between &%-F%& and the <&'string'&> is optional.
 .oindex "&%-f%&"
 .cindex "sender" "address"
 .cindex "address" "sender"
-.cindex "trusted user"
+.cindex "trusted users"
 .cindex "envelope sender"
 .cindex "user" "trusted"
 This option sets the address of the envelope sender of a locally-generated
@@ -3520,7 +3526,7 @@ headers.)
 .vitem &%-i%&
 .oindex "&%-i%&"
 .cindex "Solaris" "&'mail'& command"
-.cindex "dot in incoming" "non-SMTP message"
+.cindex "dot" "in incoming non-SMTP message"
 This option, which has the same effect as &%-oi%&, specifies that a dot on a
 line by itself should not terminate an incoming, non-SMTP message. I can find
 no documentation for this option in Solaris 2.4 Sendmail, but the &'mailx'&
@@ -3686,7 +3692,6 @@ the messages are active, their status is not altered. This option can be used
 only by an admin user or by the user who originally caused the message to be
 placed on the queue.
 
-.new
 .vitem &%-Mset%&&~<&'message&~id'&>
 .oindex "&%-Mset%&
 .cindex "testing" "string expansion"
@@ -3698,7 +3703,6 @@ the test expansions, thus setting message-specific variables such as
 available. This feature is provided to make it easier to test expansions that
 make use of these variables. However, this option can be used only by an admin
 user. See also &%-bem%&.
-.wen
 
 .vitem &%-Mt%&&~<&'message&~id'&>&~<&'message&~id'&>&~...
 .oindex "&%-Mt%&"
@@ -3909,7 +3913,7 @@ effect as &%-oem%&.
 
 .vitem &%-oi%&
 .oindex "&%-oi%&"
-.cindex "dot in incoming" "non-SMTP message"
+.cindex "dot" "in incoming non-SMTP message"
 This option, which has the same effect as &%-i%&, specifies that a dot on a
 line by itself should not terminate an incoming, non-SMTP message. Otherwise, a
 single dot does terminate, though Exim does no special processing for other
@@ -3922,7 +3926,7 @@ This option is treated as synonymous with &%-oi%&.
 
 .vitem &%-oMa%&&~<&'host&~address'&>
 .oindex "&%-oMa%&"
-.cindex "sender host address" "specifying for local message"
+.cindex "sender" "host address, specifying for local message"
 A number of options starting with &%-oM%& can be used to set values associated
 with remote hosts on locally-submitted messages (that is, messages not received
 over TCP/IP). These options can be used by any caller in conjunction with the
@@ -3946,7 +3950,7 @@ whichever one is last.
 
 .vitem &%-oMaa%&&~<&'name'&>
 .oindex "&%-oMaa%&"
-.cindex "authentication name" "specifying for local message"
+.cindex "authentication" "name, specifying for local message"
 See &%-oMa%& above for general remarks about the &%-oM%& options. The &%-oMaa%&
 option sets the value of &$sender_host_authenticated$& (the authenticator
 name). See chapter &<<CHAPSMTPAUTH>>& for a discussion of SMTP authentication.
@@ -3955,7 +3959,7 @@ authenticated SMTP session without actually using the SMTP AUTH command.
 
 .vitem &%-oMai%&&~<&'string'&>
 .oindex "&%-oMai%&"
-.cindex "authentication id" "specifying for local message"
+.cindex "authentication" "id, specifying for local message"
 See &%-oMa%& above for general remarks about the &%-oM%& options. The &%-oMai%&
 option sets the value of &$authenticated_id$& (the id that was authenticated).
 This overrides the default value (the caller's login id, except with &%-bh%&,
@@ -3964,7 +3968,7 @@ where there is no default) for messages from local sources. See chapter
 
 .vitem &%-oMas%&&~<&'address'&>
 .oindex "&%-oMas%&"
-.cindex "authentication sender" "specifying for local message"
+.cindex "authentication" "sender, specifying for local message"
 See &%-oMa%& above for general remarks about the &%-oM%& options. The &%-oMas%&
 option sets the authenticated sender value in &$authenticated_sender$&. It
 overrides the sender address that is created from the caller's login id for
@@ -3975,18 +3979,16 @@ specified on a MAIL command overrides this value. See chapter
 
 .vitem &%-oMi%&&~<&'interface&~address'&>
 .oindex "&%-oMi%&"
-.cindex "interface address" "specifying for local message"
-.new
+.cindex "interface" "address, specifying for local message"
 See &%-oMa%& above for general remarks about the &%-oM%& options. The &%-oMi%&
 option sets the IP interface address value. A port number may be included,
 using the same syntax as for &%-oMa%&. The interface address is placed in
 &$received_ip_address$& and the port number, if present, in &$received_port$&.
-.wen
 
 .vitem &%-oMr%&&~<&'protocol&~name'&>
 .oindex "&%-oMr%&"
-.cindex "protocol" "incoming &-- specifying for local message"
-.cindex "&$received_protocol$&"
+.cindex "protocol, specifying for local message"
+.vindex "&$received_protocol$&"
 See &%-oMa%& above for general remarks about the &%-oM%& options. The &%-oMr%&
 option sets the received protocol value that is stored in
 &$received_protocol$&. However, it does not apply (and is ignored) when &%-bh%&
@@ -3998,7 +4000,7 @@ be set by &%-oMr%&.
 
 .vitem &%-oMs%&&~<&'host&~name'&>
 .oindex "&%-oMs%&"
-.cindex "sender host name" "specifying for local message"
+.cindex "sender" "host name, specifying for local message"
 See &%-oMa%& above for general remarks about the &%-oM%& options. The &%-oMs%&
 option sets the sender host name in &$sender_host_name$&. When this option is
 present, Exim does not attempt to look up a host name from an IP address; it
@@ -4006,7 +4008,7 @@ uses the name it is given.
 
 .vitem &%-oMt%&&~<&'ident&~string'&>
 .oindex "&%-oMt%&"
-.cindex "sender ident string" "specifying for local message"
+.cindex "sender" "ident string, specifying for local message"
 See &%-oMa%& above for general remarks about the &%-oM%& options. The &%-oMt%&
 option sets the sender ident value in &$sender_ident$&. The default setting for
 local callers is the login id of the calling process, except when &%-bh%& is
@@ -4046,7 +4048,7 @@ described in section &<<SECTtimeformat>>&.
 .vitem &%-os%&&~<&'time'&>
 .oindex "&%-os%&"
 .cindex "timeout" "for SMTP input"
-.cindex "SMTP timeout" "input"
+.cindex "SMTP" "input timeout"
 This option sets a timeout value for incoming SMTP messages. The timeout
 applies to each SMTP command and block of data. The value can also be set by
 the &%smtp_receive_timeout%& option; it defaults to 5 minutes. The format used
@@ -4254,7 +4256,6 @@ address containing the given string, which is checked in a case-independent
 way. If the <&'rsflags'&> start with &'r'&, <&'string'&> is interpreted as a
 regular expression; otherwise it is a literal string.
 
-.new
 If you want to do periodic queue runs for messages with specific recipients,
 you can combine &%-R%& with &%-q%& and a time value. For example:
 .code
@@ -4263,7 +4264,6 @@ exim -q25m -R @special.domain.example
 This example does a queue run for messages with recipients in the given domain
 every 25 minutes. Any additional flags that are specified with &%-q%& are
 applied to each queue run.
-.wen
 
 Once a message is selected for delivery by this mechanism, all its addresses
 are processed. For the first selected message, Exim overrides any retry
@@ -4465,7 +4465,7 @@ configuration.
 
 
 
-.section "Using a different configuration file"
+.section "Using a different configuration file" "SECID40"
 .cindex "configuration file" "alternate"
 A one-off alternate configuration can be specified by the &%-C%& command line
 option, which may specify a single file or a list of files. However, when
@@ -4577,11 +4577,11 @@ described.
 
 
 
-.section "File inclusions in the configuration file"
+.section "File inclusions in the configuration file" "SECID41"
 .cindex "inclusions in configuration file"
 .cindex "configuration file" "including other files"
-.cindex ".include in configuration file"
-.cindex ".include_if_exists in configuration file"
+.cindex "&`.include`& in configuration file"
+.cindex "&`.include_if_exists`& in configuration file"
 You can include other files inside Exim's run time configuration file by
 using this syntax:
 .display
@@ -4630,7 +4630,7 @@ Macros may also be defined between router, transport, authenticator, or ACL
 definitions. They may not, however, be defined within an individual driver or
 ACL, or in the &%local_scan%&, retry, or rewrite sections of the configuration.
 
-.section "Macro substitution"
+.section "Macro substitution" "SECID42"
 Once a macro is defined, all subsequent lines in the file (and any included
 files) are scanned for the macro name; if there are several macros, the line is
 scanned for each in turn, in the order in which the macros are defined. The
@@ -4650,7 +4650,7 @@ line is ignored. A macro at the start of a line may turn the line into a
 comment line or a &`.include`& line.
 
 
-.section "Redefining macros"
+.section "Redefining macros" "SECID43"
 Once defined, the value of a macro can be redefined later in the configuration
 (or in an included file). Redefinition is specified by using &'=='& instead of
 &'='&. For example:
@@ -4671,7 +4671,7 @@ MAC == MAC and something added
 This can be helpful in situations where the configuration file is built
 from a number of other files.
 
-.section "Overriding macro values"
+.section "Overriding macro values" "SECID44"
 The values set for macros in the configuration file can be overridden by the
 &%-D%& command line option, but Exim gives up its root privilege when &%-D%& is
 used, unless called by root or the Exim user. A definition on the command line
@@ -4680,7 +4680,7 @@ file to be ignored.
 
 
 
-.section "Example of macro usage"
+.section "Example of macro usage" "SECID45"
 As an example of macro usage, consider a configuration where aliases are looked
 up in a MySQL database. It helps to keep the file less cluttered if long
 strings such as SQL statements are defined separately as macros, for example:
@@ -4697,9 +4697,9 @@ address lists. In Exim 4 these are handled better by named lists &-- see
 section &<<SECTnamedlists>>&.
 
 
-.section "Conditional skips in the configuration file"
+.section "Conditional skips in the configuration file" "SECID46"
 .cindex "configuration file" "conditional skips"
-.cindex ".ifdef"
+.cindex "&`.ifdef`&"
 You can use the directives &`.ifdef`&, &`.ifndef`&, &`.elifdef`&,
 &`.elifndef`&, &`.else`&, and &`.endif`& to dynamically include or exclude
 portions of the configuration file. The processing happens whenever the file is
@@ -4760,7 +4760,7 @@ The following sections describe the syntax used for the different data types
 that are found in option settings.
 
 
-.section "Boolean options"
+.section "Boolean options" "SECID47"
 .cindex "format" "boolean"
 .cindex "boolean configuration values"
 .oindex "&%no_%&&'xxx'&"
@@ -4786,51 +4786,57 @@ You can use whichever syntax you prefer.
 
 
 
-.section "Integer values"
+.section "Integer values" "SECID48"
 .cindex "integer configuration values"
 .cindex "format" "integer"
-If an integer data item starts with the characters &"0x"&, the remainder of it
-is interpreted as a hexadecimal number. Otherwise, it is treated as octal if it
-starts with the digit 0, and decimal if not. If an integer value is followed by
-the letter K, it is multiplied by 1024; if it is followed by the letter M, it
-is multiplied by 1024x1024.
+.new
+If an option's type is given as &"integer"&, the value can be given in decimal,
+hexadecimal, or octal. If it starts with a digit greater than zero, a decimal
+number is assumed. Otherwise, it is treated as an octal number unless it starts
+with the characters &"0x"&, in which case the remainder is interpreted as a
+hexadecimal number.
+.wen
 
-When the values of integer option settings are output, values which are an
-exact multiple of 1024 or 1024x1024 are
-sometimes, but not always,
-printed using the letters K and M. The printing style is independent of the
-actual input format that was used.
+If an integer value is followed by the letter K, it is multiplied by 1024; if
+it is followed by the letter M, it is multiplied by 1024x1024. When the values
+of integer option settings are output, values which are an exact multiple of
+1024 or 1024x1024 are sometimes, but not always, printed using the letters K
+and M. The printing style is independent of the actual input format that was
+used.
 
 
-.section "Octal integer values"
+.section "Octal integer values" "SECID49"
 .cindex "integer format"
 .cindex "format" "octal integer"
-The value of an option specified as an octal integer is always interpreted in
-octal, whether or not it starts with the digit zero. Such options are always
-output in octal.
-
+.new
+If an option's type is given as &"octal integer"&, its value is always
+interpreted as an octal number, whether or not it starts with the digit zero.
+Such options are always output in octal.
+.wen
 
 
-.section "Fixed point number values"
+.section "Fixed point numbers" "SECID50"
 .cindex "fixed point configuration values"
 .cindex "format" "fixed point"
-A fixed point number consists of a decimal integer, optionally followed by a
-decimal point and up to three further digits.
+.new
+If an option's type is given as &"fixed-point"&, its value must be a decimal
+integer, optionally followed by a decimal point and up to three further digits.
+.wen
 
 
 
-.section "Time interval values" "SECTtimeformat"
+.section "Time intervals" "SECTtimeformat"
 .cindex "time interval" "specifying in configuration"
 .cindex "format" "time interval"
 A time interval is specified as a sequence of numbers, each followed by one of
 the following letters, with no intervening white space:
 
-.table2 50pt
-.row &~&%s%& seconds
-.row &~&%m%& minutes
-.row &~&%h%& hours
-.row &~&%d%& days
-.row &~&%w%& weeks
+.table2 30pt
+.irow &%s%& seconds
+.irow &%m%& minutes
+.irow &%h%& hours
+.irow &%d%& days
+.irow &%w%& weeks
 .endtable
 
 For example, &"3h50m"& specifies 3 hours and 50 minutes. The values of time
@@ -4842,16 +4848,18 @@ is perfectly acceptable, for example, to specify &"90m"& instead of &"1h30m"&.
 .section "String values" "SECTstrings"
 .cindex "string" "format of configuration values"
 .cindex "format" "string"
-If a string data item does not start with a double-quote character, it is taken
-as consisting of the remainder of the line plus any continuation lines,
-starting at the first character after any leading white space, with trailing
-white space removed, and with no interpretation of the characters in the
-string. Because Exim removes comment lines (those beginning with #) at an early
-stage, they can appear in the middle of a multi-line string. The following
-settings are therefore equivalent:
+.new
+If an option's type is specified as &"string"&, the value can be specified with
+or without double-quotes. If it does not start with a double-quote, the value
+consists of the remainder of the line plus any continuation lines, starting at
+the first character after any leading white space, with trailing white space
+removed, and with no interpretation of the characters in the string. Because
+Exim removes comment lines (those beginning with #) at an early stage, they can
+appear in the middle of a multi-line string. The following two settings are
+therefore equivalent:
+.wen
 .code
 trusted_users = uucp:mail
-
 trusted_users = uucp:\
                 # This comment line is ignored
                 mail
@@ -4863,12 +4871,12 @@ double-quote, and any backslash characters other than those used for line
 continuation are interpreted as escape characters, as follows:
 
 .table2 100pt
-.row &~&`\\`&                     "single backslash"
-.row &~&`\n`&                     "newline"
-.row &~&`\r`&                     "carriage return"
-.row &~&`\t`&                     "tab"
-.row "&~&`\`&<&'octal digits'&>"  "up to 3 octal digits specify one character"
-.row "&~&`\x`&<&'hex digits'&>"   "up to 2 hexadecimal digits specify one &&&
+.irow &`\\`&                     "single backslash"
+.irow &`\n`&                     "newline"
+.irow &`\r`&                     "carriage return"
+.irow &`\t`&                     "tab"
+.irow "&`\`&<&'octal digits'&>"  "up to 3 octal digits specify one character"
+.irow "&`\x`&<&'hex digits'&>"   "up to 2 hexadecimal digits specify one &&&
                                    character"
 .endtable
 
@@ -4883,8 +4891,7 @@ in order to continue lines, so you may come across older configuration files
 and examples that apparently quote unnecessarily.
 
 
-.section "Expanded strings"
-.cindex "string expansion" "definition of"
+.section "Expanded strings" "SECID51"
 .cindex "expansion" "definition of"
 Some strings in the configuration file are subjected to &'string expansion'&,
 by which means various parts of the string may be changed according to the
@@ -4896,10 +4903,10 @@ backslashes that are required for that reason must be doubled if they are
 within a quoted configuration string.
 
 
-.section "User and group names"
+.section "User and group names" "SECID52"
 .cindex "user name" "format of"
 .cindex "format" "user name"
-.cindex "group" "name format"
+.cindex "groups" "name format"
 .cindex "format" "group name"
 User and group names are specified as strings, using the syntax described
 above, but the strings are interpreted specially. A user or group name must
@@ -4910,7 +4917,7 @@ either consist entirely of digits, or be a name that can be looked up using the
 .section "List construction" "SECTlistconstruct"
 .cindex "list" "syntax of in configuration"
 .cindex "format" "list item in configuration"
-.cindex "string list" "definition"
+.cindex "string" "list, definition of"
 The data for some configuration options is a list of items, with colon as the
 default separator. Many of these options are shown with type &"string list"& in
 the descriptions later in this document. Others are listed as &"domain list"&,
@@ -4936,8 +4943,11 @@ list items, it is not ignored when parsing the list. The space after the first
 colon in the example above is necessary. If it were not there, the list would
 be interpreted as the two items 127.0.0.1:: and 1.
 
+.new
+.section "Changing list separators" "SECID53"
 .cindex "list separator" "changing"
 .cindex "IPv6" "addresses in lists"
+.wen
 Doubling colons in IPv6 addresses is an unwelcome chore, so a mechanism was
 introduced to allow the separator character to be changed. If a list begins
 with a left angle bracket, followed by any punctuation character, that
@@ -4950,6 +4960,32 @@ This facility applies to all lists, with the exception of the list in
 &%log_file_path%&. It is recommended that the use of non-colon separators be
 confined to circumstances where they really are needed.
 
+.new
+.cindex "list separator" "newline as"
+.cindex "newline as list separator"
+It is also possible to use newline and other control characters (those with
+code values less than 32, plus DEL) as separators in lists. Such separators
+must be provided literally at the time the list is processed. For options that
+are string-expanded, you can write the separator using a normal escape
+sequence. This will be processed by the expander before the string is
+interpreted as a list. For example, if a newline-separated list of domains is
+generated by a lookup, you can process it directly by a line such as this:
+.code
+domains = <\n ${lookup mysql{.....}}
+.endd
+This avoids having to change the list separator in such data. You are unlikely
+to want to use a control character as a separator in an option that is not
+expanded, because the value is literal text. However, it can be done by giving
+the value in quotes. For example:
+.code
+local_interfaces = "<\n 127.0.0.1 \n ::1"
+.endd
+Unlike printing character separators, which can be included in list items by
+doubling, it is not possible to include a control character as data when it is
+set as the separator. Two such characters in succession are interpreted as
+enclosing an empty list item.
+.wen
+
 
 
 .section "Empty items in lists" "SECTempitelis"
@@ -5300,7 +5336,7 @@ bounce message ever lasts a week.
 
 
 
-.section "ACL configuration"
+.section "ACL configuration" "SECID54"
 .cindex "default" "ACLs"
 .cindex "&ACL;" "default configuration"
 In the default configuration, the ACL section follows the main configuration.
@@ -5506,7 +5542,7 @@ accept
 This final line in the DATA ACL accepts the message unconditionally.
 
 
-.section "Router configuration"
+.section "Router configuration" "SECID55"
 .cindex "default" "routers"
 .cindex "routers" "default"
 The router configuration comes next in the default configuration, introduced
@@ -5617,7 +5653,7 @@ namely:
 # local_part_suffix = +* : -*
 # local_part_suffix_optional
 .endd
-.cindex "&$local_part_suffix$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_suffix$&"
 show how you can specify the recognition of local part suffixes. If the first
 is uncommented, a suffix beginning with either a plus or a minus sign, followed
 by any sequence of characters, is removed from the local part and placed in the
@@ -5682,7 +5718,7 @@ routers, so the address is bounced. The commented suffix settings fulfil the
 same purpose as they do for the &(userforward)& router.
 
 
-.section "Transport configuration"
+.section "Transport configuration" "SECID56"
 .cindex "default" "transports"
 .cindex "transports" "default"
 Transports define mechanisms for actually delivering messages. They operate
@@ -5746,7 +5782,7 @@ filter files.
 
 
 
-.section "Default retry rule"
+.section "Default retry rule" "SECID57"
 .cindex "retry" "default rule"
 .cindex "default" "retry rule"
 The retry section of the configuration file contains rules which affect the way
@@ -5767,7 +5803,7 @@ is not delivered after 4 days of temporary failure, it is bounced.
 
 
 
-.section "Rewriting configuration"
+.section "Rewriting configuration" "SECID58"
 The rewriting section of the configuration, introduced by
 .code
 begin rewrite
@@ -5793,19 +5829,19 @@ to support most MUA software.
 The example PLAIN authenticator looks like this:
 .code
 #PLAIN:
-#  driver                     = plaintext
-#  server_set_id              = $auth2
-#  server_prompts             = :
-#  server_condition           = Authentication is not yet configured
+#  driver                  = plaintext
+#  server_set_id           = $auth2
+#  server_prompts          = :
+#  server_condition        = Authentication is not yet configured
 #  server_advertise_condition = ${if def:tls_cipher }
 .endd
 And the example LOGIN authenticator looks like this:
 .code
 #LOGIN:
-#  driver                     = plaintext
-#  server_set_id              = $auth1
-#  server_prompts             = <| Username: | Password:
-#  server_condition           = Authentication is not yet configured
+#  driver                  = plaintext
+#  server_set_id           = $auth1
+#  server_prompts          = <| Username: | Password:
+#  server_condition        = Authentication is not yet configured
 #  server_advertise_condition = ${if def:tls_cipher }
 .endd
 
@@ -5887,7 +5923,7 @@ $ is needed because string expansion also interprets dollar characters.
 
 
 
-.section "Testing regular expressions"
+.section "Testing regular expressions" "SECID59"
 .cindex "testing" "regular expressions"
 .cindex "regular expressions" "testing"
 .cindex "&'pcretest'&"
@@ -5933,7 +5969,7 @@ in &$1$& and the &"ac"& or &"edu"& in &$2$&.
 
 .chapter "File and database lookups" "CHAPfdlookup"
 .scindex IIDfidalo1 "file" "lookups"
-.scindex IIDfidalo2 "database lookups"
+.scindex IIDfidalo2 "database" "lookups"
 .cindex "lookup" "description of"
 Exim can be configured to look up data in files or databases as it processes
 messages. Two different kinds of syntax are used:
@@ -5959,7 +5995,7 @@ if you have read the other two first. If you are reading this for the first
 time, be aware that some of it will make a lot more sense after you have read
 chapters &<<CHAPdomhosaddlists>>& and &<<CHAPexpand>>&.
 
-.section "Examples of different lookup syntax"
+.section "Examples of different lookup syntax" "SECID60"
 It is easy to confuse the two different kinds of lookup, especially as the
 lists that may contain the second kind are always expanded before being
 processed as lists. Therefore, they may also contain lookups of the first kind.
@@ -6004,7 +6040,7 @@ available. Any of them can be used in any part of the configuration where a
 lookup is permitted.
 
 
-.section "Lookup types"
+.section "Lookup types" "SECID61"
 .cindex "lookup" "types of"
 .cindex "single-key lookup" "definition of"
 Two different types of data lookup are implemented:
@@ -6046,7 +6082,7 @@ The following single-key lookup types are implemented:
 &(cdb)&: The given file is searched as a Constant DataBase file, using the key
 string without a terminating binary zero. The cdb format is designed for
 indexed files that are read frequently and never updated, except by total
-re-creation. As such, it is particulary suitable for large files containing
+re-creation. As such, it is particularly suitable for large files containing
 aliases or other indexed data referenced by an MTA. Information about cdb can
 be found in several places:
 .display
@@ -6246,7 +6282,7 @@ lookup types support only literal keys.
 .endlist ilist
 
 
-.section "Query-style lookup types"
+.section "Query-style lookup types" "SECID62"
 .cindex "lookup" "query-style types"
 .cindex "query-style lookup" "list of types"
 The supported query-style lookup types are listed below. Further details about
@@ -6315,12 +6351,14 @@ not likely to be useful in normal operation.
 .next
 .cindex "whoson lookup type"
 .cindex "lookup" "whoson"
-&(whoson)&: &'Whoson'& (&url(http://whoson.sourceforge.net)) is a proposed
-Internet protocol that allows Internet server programs to check whether a
-particular (dynamically allocated) IP address is currently allocated to a known
-(trusted) user and, optionally, to obtain the identity of the said user. In
-Exim, this can be used to implement &"POP before SMTP"& checking using ACL
-statements such as
+.new
+&(whoson)&: &'Whoson'& (&url(http://whoson.sourceforge.net)) is a protocol that
+allows a server to check whether a particular (dynamically allocated) IP
+address is currently allocated to a known (trusted) user and, optionally, to
+obtain the identity of the said user. For SMTP servers, &'Whoson'& was popular
+at one time for &"POP before SMTP"& authentication, but that approach has been
+superseded by SMTP authentication. In Exim, &'Whoson'& can be used to implement
+&"POP before SMTP"& checking using ACL statements such as
 .code
 require condition = \
   ${lookup whoson {$sender_host_address}{yes}{no}}
@@ -6329,11 +6367,12 @@ The query consists of a single IP address. The value returned is the name of
 the authenticated user, which is stored in the variable &$value$&. However, in
 this example, the data in &$value$& is not used; the result of the lookup is
 one of the fixed strings &"yes"& or &"no"&.
+.wen
 .endlist
 
 
 
-.section "Temporary errors in lookups"
+.section "Temporary errors in lookups" "SECID63"
 .cindex "lookup" "temporary error in"
 Lookup functions can return temporary error codes if the lookup cannot be
 completed. For example, an SQL or LDAP database might be unavailable. For this
@@ -6356,11 +6395,9 @@ or may give up altogether.
 In this context, a &"default value"& is a value specified by the administrator
 that is to be used if a lookup fails.
 
-.new
 &*Note:*& This section applies only to single-key lookups. For query-style
 lookups, the facilities of the query language must be used. An attempt to
 specify a default for a query-style lookup provokes an error.
-.wen
 
 If &"*"& is added to a single-key lookup type (for example, &%lsearch*%&)
 and the initial lookup fails, the key &"*"& is looked up in the file to
@@ -6502,7 +6539,7 @@ subject key is always followed by a dot.
 
 
 
-.section "Lookup caching"
+.section "Lookup caching" "SECID64"
 .cindex "lookup" "caching"
 .cindex "caching" "lookup data"
 Exim caches all lookup results in order to avoid needless repetition of
@@ -6524,7 +6561,7 @@ complete.
 
 
 
-.section "Quoting lookup data"
+.section "Quoting lookup data" "SECID65"
 .cindex "lookup" "quoting"
 .cindex "quoting" "in lookups"
 When data from an incoming message is included in a query-style lookup, there
@@ -6600,7 +6637,7 @@ ${lookup dnsdb{>: a=host1.example}}
 It is permitted to specify a space as the separator character. Further
 white space is ignored.
 
-.section "Pseudo dnsdb record types"
+.section "Pseudo dnsdb record types" "SECID66"
 .cindex "MX record" "in &(dnsdb)& lookup"
 By default, both the preference value and the host name are returned for
 each MX record, separated by a space. If you want only host names, you can use
@@ -6611,7 +6648,7 @@ ${lookup dnsdb{mxh=a.b.example}}
 In this case, the preference values are omitted, and just the host names are
 returned.
 
-.cindex "name server" "for enclosing domain"
+.cindex "name server for enclosing domain"
 Another pseudo-type is ZNS (for &"zone NS"&). It performs a lookup for NS
 records on the given domain, but if none are found, it removes the first
 component of the domain name, and tries again. This process continues until NS
@@ -6648,7 +6685,7 @@ The authorization code can be &"Y"& for yes, &"N"& for no, &"X"& for explicit
 authorization required but absent, or &"?"& for unknown.
 
 
-.section "Multiple dnsdb lookups"
+.section "Multiple dnsdb lookups" "SECID67"
 In the previous sections, &(dnsdb)& lookups for a single domain are described.
 However, you can specify a list of domains or IP addresses in a single
 &(dnsdb)& lookup. The list is specified in the normal Exim way, with colon as
@@ -6688,7 +6725,7 @@ yields some data, the lookup succeeds.
 
 
 .section "More about LDAP" "SECTldap"
-.cindex "LDAP lookup"
+.cindex "LDAP" "lookup, more about"
 .cindex "lookup" "LDAP"
 .cindex "Solaris" "LDAP"
 The original LDAP implementation came from the University of Michigan; this has
@@ -6745,7 +6782,7 @@ secure (encrypted) LDAP connections. The second of these ensures that an
 encrypted TLS connection is used.
 
 
-.section "LDAP quoting"
+.section "LDAP quoting" "SECID68"
 .cindex "LDAP" "quoting"
 Two levels of quoting are required in LDAP queries, the first for LDAP itself
 and the second because the LDAP query is represented as a URL. Furthermore,
@@ -6802,7 +6839,7 @@ There are some further comments about quoting in the section on LDAP
 authentication below.
 
 
-.section "LDAP connections"
+.section "LDAP connections" "SECID69"
 .cindex "LDAP" "connections"
 The connection to an LDAP server may either be over TCP/IP, or, when OpenLDAP
 is in use, via a Unix domain socket. The example given above does not specify
@@ -6822,7 +6859,7 @@ Errors which cause the next server to be tried are connection failures, bind
 failures, and timeouts.
 
 For each server name in the list, a port number can be given. The standard way
-of specifing a host and port is to use a colon separator (RFC 1738). Because
+of specifying a host and port is to use a colon separator (RFC 1738). Because
 &%ldap_default_servers%& is a colon-separated list, such colons have to be
 doubled. For example
 .code
@@ -6876,7 +6913,7 @@ Using &`ldapi`& with no host or path in the query, and no setting of
 
 
 
-.section "LDAP authentication and control information"
+.section "LDAP authentication and control information" "SECID70"
 .cindex "LDAP" "authentication"
 The LDAP URL syntax provides no way of passing authentication and other control
 information to the server. To make this possible, the URL in an LDAP query may
@@ -6960,7 +6997,7 @@ SMTP authentication. See the &%ldapauth%& expansion string condition in chapter
 
 
 
-.section "Format of data returned by LDAP"
+.section "Format of data returned by LDAP" "SECID71"
 .cindex "LDAP" "returned data formats"
 The &(ldapdn)& lookup type returns the Distinguished Name from a single entry
 as a sequence of values, for example
@@ -7069,7 +7106,7 @@ If the result of the query yields more than one row, it is all concatenated,
 with a newline between the data for each row.
 
 
-.section "More about MySQL, PostgreSQL, Oracle, and InterBase"
+.section "More about MySQL, PostgreSQL, Oracle, and InterBase" "SECID72"
 .cindex "MySQL" "lookup type"
 .cindex "PostgreSQL lookup type"
 .cindex "lookup" "MySQL"
@@ -7109,7 +7146,7 @@ for MySQL because these escapes are not recognized in contexts where these
 characters are not special.
 
 
-.section "Special MySQL features"
+.section "Special MySQL features" "SECID73"
 For MySQL, an empty host name or the use of &"localhost"& in &%mysql_servers%&
 causes a connection to the server on the local host by means of a Unix domain
 socket. An alternate socket can be specified in parentheses. The full syntax of
@@ -7132,7 +7169,7 @@ anything (for example, setting a field to the value it already has), the result
 is zero because no rows are affected.
 
 
-.section "Special PostgreSQL features"
+.section "Special PostgreSQL features" "SECID74"
 PostgreSQL lookups can also use Unix domain socket connections to the database.
 This is usually faster and costs less CPU time than a TCP/IP connection.
 However it can be used only if the mail server runs on the same machine as the
@@ -7151,7 +7188,7 @@ affected.
 
 .section "More about SQLite" "SECTsqlite"
 .cindex "lookup" "SQLite"
-.cindex "SQLite lookup type"
+.cindex "sqlite lookup type"
 SQLite is different to the other SQL lookups because a file name is required in
 addition to the SQL query. An SQLite database is a single file, and there is no
 daemon as in the other SQL databases. The interface to Exim requires the name
@@ -7201,7 +7238,7 @@ general facilities that apply to all four kinds of list.
 
 
 
-.section "Expansion of lists"
+.section "Expansion of lists" "SECID75"
 .cindex "expansion" "of lists"
 Each list is expanded as a single string before it is used. The result of
 expansion must be a list, possibly containing empty items, which is split up
@@ -7231,7 +7268,7 @@ senders based on the receiving domain.
 
 
 
-.section "Negated items in lists"
+.section "Negated items in lists" "SECID76"
 .cindex "list" "negation"
 .cindex "negation" "in lists"
 Items in a list may be positive or negative. Negative items are indicated by a
@@ -7306,7 +7343,7 @@ any domain matching &`*.b.c`& is not.
 
 
 
-.section "An lsearch file is not an out-of-line list"
+.section "An lsearch file is not an out-of-line list" "SECID77"
 As will be described in the sections that follow, lookups can be used in lists
 to provide indexed methods of checking list membership. There has been some
 confusion about the way &(lsearch)& lookups work in lists. Because
@@ -7401,7 +7438,7 @@ hosts. The default configuration is set up like this.
 
 
 
-.section "Named lists compared with macros"
+.section "Named lists compared with macros" "SECID78"
 .cindex "list" "named compared with macro"
 .cindex "macro" "compared with named list"
 At first sight, named lists might seem to be no different from macros in the
@@ -7427,7 +7464,7 @@ auth_advertise_hosts = !host1 : !host2
 .endd
 
 
-.section "Named list caching"
+.section "Named list caching" "SECID79"
 .cindex "list" "caching of named"
 .cindex "caching" "named lists"
 While processing a message, Exim caches the result of checking a named list if
@@ -7641,7 +7678,7 @@ You need to be particularly careful with this when single-key lookups are
 involved, to ensure that the right value is being used as the key.
 
 
-.section "Special host list patterns"
+.section "Special host list patterns" "SECID80"
 .cindex "empty item in hosts list"
 .cindex "host list" "empty string in"
 If a host list item is the empty string, it matches only when no remote host is
@@ -7793,8 +7830,8 @@ case letters and dots as separators instead of the more usual colon, because
 colon is the key terminator in &(lsearch)& files. Full, unabbreviated IPv6
 addresses are always used.
 
-&*Warning*&: Specifing &%net32-%& (for an IPv4 address) or &%net128-%& (for an
-IPv6 address) is not the same as specifing just &%net-%& without a number. In
+&*Warning*&: Specifying &%net32-%& (for an IPv4 address) or &%net128-%& (for an
+IPv6 address) is not the same as specifying just &%net-%& without a number. In
 the former case the key strings include the mask value, whereas in the latter
 case the IP address is used on its own.
 
@@ -7821,7 +7858,6 @@ Consider what will happen if a name cannot be found.
 Because of the problems of determining host names from IP addresses, matching
 against host names is not as common as matching against IP addresses.
 
-.new
 By default, in order to find a host name, Exim first does a reverse DNS lookup;
 if no name is found in the DNS, the system function (&[gethostbyaddr()]& or
 &[getipnodebyaddr()]& if available) is tried. The order in which these lookups
@@ -7831,7 +7867,6 @@ for these names and compares them with the IP address that it started with.
 Only those names whose IP addresses match are accepted. Any other names are
 discarded. If no names are left, Exim behaves as if the host name cannot be
 found. In the most common case there is only one name and one IP address.
-.wen
 
 There are some options that control what happens if a host name cannot be
 found. These are described in section &<<SECTbehipnot>>& below.
@@ -7932,7 +7967,7 @@ for example
 .code
 dbm;/host/accept/list
 .endd
-a single-key lookup is performend, using the host name as its key. If the
+a single-key lookup is performed, using the host name as its key. If the
 lookup succeeds, the host matches the item. The actual data that is looked up
 is not used.
 
@@ -7945,7 +7980,7 @@ lookup, both using the same file.
 
 
 
-.section "Host list patterns for query-style lookups"
+.section "Host list patterns for query-style lookups" "SECID81"
 If a pattern is of the form
 .display
 <&'query-style-search-type'&>;<&'query'&>
@@ -8299,7 +8334,7 @@ string.
 
 
 
-.section "Character escape sequences in expanded strings"
+.section "Character escape sequences in expanded strings" "SECID82"
 .cindex "expansion" "escape sequences"
 A backslash followed by one of the letters &"n"&, &"r"&, or &"t"& in an
 expanded string is recognized as an escape sequence for the character newline,
@@ -8313,10 +8348,10 @@ in. Their interpretation in expansions as well is useful for unquoted strings,
 and for other cases such as looked-up strings that are then expanded.
 
 
-.section "Testing string expansions"
+.section "Testing string expansions" "SECID83"
 .cindex "expansion" "testing"
 .cindex "testing" "string expansion"
-.cindex "&%-be%& option"
+.oindex "&%-be%&"
 Many expansions can be tested by calling Exim with the &%-be%& option. This
 takes the command arguments, or lines from the standard input if there are no
 arguments, runs them through the string expansion code, and writes the results
@@ -8330,8 +8365,7 @@ Exim gives up its root privilege when it is called with the &%-be%& option, and
 instead runs under the uid and gid it was called with, to prevent users from
 using &%-be%& for reading files to which they do not have access.
 
-.new
-.cindex "&%-bem%& option"
+.oindex "&%-bem%&"
 If you want to test expansions that include variables whose values are taken
 from a message, there are two other options that can be used. The &%-bem%&
 option is like &%-be%& except that it is followed by a file name. The file is
@@ -8346,7 +8380,6 @@ exim -be -Mset 1GrA8W-0004WS-LQ '$recipients'
 .endd
 This loads the message from Exim's spool before doing the test expansions, and
 is therefore restricted to admin users.
-.wen
 
 
 .section "Forced expansion failure" "SECTforexpfai"
@@ -8448,7 +8481,7 @@ form:
 .display
 <&'key1'&> = <&'value1'&>  <&'key2'&> = <&'value2'&> ...
 .endd
-.cindex "&$value$&"
+.vindex "&$value$&"
 where the equals signs and spaces (but not both) are optional. If any of the
 values contain white space, they must be enclosed in double quotes, and any
 values that are enclosed in double quotes are subject to escape processing as
@@ -8507,6 +8540,26 @@ yields &"99"&. Two successive separators mean that the field between them is
 empty (for example, the fifth field above).
 
 
+.new
+.vitem &*${filter{*&<&'string'&>&*}{*&<&'condition'&>&*}}*&
+.cindex "list" "selecting by condition"
+.cindex "expansion" "selecting from list by condition"
+.vindex "&$item$&"
+After expansion, <&'string'&> is interpreted as a list, colon-separated by
+default, but the separator can be changed in the usual way. For each item
+in this list, its value is place in &$item$&, and then the condition is
+evaluated. If the condition is true, &$item$& is added to the output as an
+item in a new list; if the condition is false, the item is discarded. The
+separator used for the output list is the same as the one used for the
+input, but a separator setting is not included in the output. For example:
+.code
+${filter{a:b:c}{!eq{$item}{b}}
+.endd
+yields &`a:c`&. At the end of the expansion, the value of &$item$& is restored
+to what it was before. See also the &*map*& and &*reduce*& expansion items.
+.wen
+
+
 .vitem &*${hash{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}{*&<&'string3'&>&*}}*&
 .cindex "hash function" "textual"
 .cindex "expansion" "textual hash"
@@ -8548,9 +8601,9 @@ See &*$rheader*& below.
 .vitem "&*$rheader_*&<&'header&~name'&>&*:*&&~or&~&&&
         &*$rh_*&<&'header&~name'&>&*:*&"
 .cindex "expansion" "header insertion"
-.cindex "&$header_$&"
-.cindex "&$bheader_$&"
-.cindex "&$rheader_$&"
+.vindex "&$header_$&"
+.vindex "&$bheader_$&"
+.vindex "&$rheader_$&"
 .cindex "header lines" "in expansion strings"
 .cindex "header lines" "character sets"
 .cindex "header lines" "decoding"
@@ -8606,7 +8659,6 @@ any printing characters except space and colon. Consequently, curly brackets
 &'do not'& terminate header names, and should not be used to enclose them as
 if they were variables. Attempting to do so causes a syntax error.
 
-.new
 Only header lines that are common to all copies of a message are visible to
 this mechanism. These are the original header lines that are received with the
 message, and any that are added by an ACL statement or by a system
@@ -8619,7 +8671,6 @@ message is received. Header lines that are added in a RCPT ACL (for example)
 are saved until the message's incoming header lines are available, at which
 point they are added. When a DATA ACL is running, however, header lines added
 by earlier ACLs are visible.
-.wen
 
 Upper case and lower case letters are synonymous in header names. If the
 following character is white space, the terminating colon may be omitted, but
@@ -8629,7 +8680,6 @@ If the message does not contain the given header, the expansion item is
 replaced by an empty string. (See the &%def%& condition in section
 &<<SECTexpcond>>& for a means of testing for the existence of a header.)
 
-.new
 If there is more than one header with the same name, they are all concatenated
 to form the substitution string, up to a maximum length of 64K. Unless
 &%rheader%& is being used, leading and trailing white space is removed from
@@ -8638,7 +8688,6 @@ newline character is then inserted between non-empty headers, but there is no
 newline at the very end. For the &%header%& and &%bheader%& expansion, for
 those headers that contain lists of addresses, a comma is also inserted at the
 junctions between headers. This does not happen for the &%rheader%& expansion.
-.wen
 
 
 .vitem &*${hmac{*&<&'hashname'&>&*}{*&<&'secret'&>&*}{*&<&'string'&>&*}}*&
@@ -8707,7 +8756,7 @@ condition = ${if >{$acl_m4}{3}}
 
 .vitem &*${length{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}}*&
 .cindex "expansion" "string truncation"
-.cindex "&%length%&" "expansion item"
+.cindex "&%length%& expansion item"
 The &%length%& item is used to extract the initial portion of a string. Both
 strings are expanded, and the first one must yield a number, <&'n'&>, say. If
 you are using a fixed value for the number, that is, if <&'string1'&> does not
@@ -8742,7 +8791,7 @@ other place where white space is significant, the lookup item must be enclosed
 in double quotes. The use of data lookups in users' filter files may be locked
 out by the system administrator.
 
-.cindex "&$value$&"
+.vindex "&$value$&"
 If the lookup succeeds, <&'string1'&> is expanded and replaces the entire item.
 During its expansion, the variable &$value$& contains the data returned by the
 lookup. Afterwards it reverts to the value it had previously (at the outer
@@ -8782,6 +8831,25 @@ ${lookup nisplus {[name=$local_part],passwd.org_dir:gcos} \
   {$value}fail}
 .endd
 
+
+.new
+.vitem &*${map{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}}*&
+.cindex "expansion" "list creation"
+.vindex "&$item$&"
+After expansion, <&'string1'&> is interpreted as a list, colon-separated by
+default, but the separator can be changed in the usual way. For each item
+in this list, its value is place in &$item$&, and then <&'string2'&> is
+expanded and added to the output as an item in a new list. The separator used
+for the output list is the same as the one used for the input, but a separator
+setting is not included in the output. For example:
+.code
+${map{a:b:c}{[$item]}} ${map{<- x-y-z}{($item)}}
+.endd
+expands to &`[a]:[b]:[c] (x)-(y)-(z)`&. At the end of the expansion, the
+value of &$item$& is restored to what it was before. See also the &*filter*&
+and &*reduce*& expansion items.
+.wen
+
 .vitem &*${nhash{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}{*&<&'string3'&>&*}}*&
 .cindex "expansion" "numeric hash"
 .cindex "hash function" "numeric"
@@ -8829,7 +8897,7 @@ out the use of this expansion item in filter files.
 
 
 .vitem &*${prvs{*&<&'address'&>&*}{*&<&'secret'&>&*}{*&<&'keynumber'&>&*}}*&
-.cindex "prvs" "expansion item"
+.cindex "&%prvs%& expansion item"
 The first argument is a complete email address and the second is secret
 keystring. The third argument, specifying a key number, is optional. If absent,
 it defaults to 0. The result of the expansion is a prvs-signed email address,
@@ -8839,7 +8907,7 @@ and an example, see section &<<SECTverifyPRVS>>&.
 
 .vitem "&*${prvscheck{*&<&'address'&>&*}{*&<&'secret'&>&*}&&&
         {*&<&'string'&>&*}}*&"
-.cindex "prvscheck" "expansion item"
+.cindex "&%prvscheck%& expansion item"
 This expansion item is the complement of the &%prvs%& item. It is used for
 checking prvs-signed addresses. If the expansion of the first argument does not
 yield a syntactically valid prvs-signed address, the whole item expands to the
@@ -8883,7 +8951,7 @@ locks out the use of this expansion item in filter files.
 .vitem "&*${readsocket{*&<&'name'&>&*}{*&<&'request'&>&*}&&&
         {*&<&'timeout'&>&*}{*&<&'eol&~string'&>&*}{*&<&'fail&~string'&>&*}}*&"
 .cindex "expansion" "inserting from a socket"
-.cindex "socket" "use of in expansion"
+.cindex "socketuse of in expansion"
 .cindex "&%readsocket%& expansion item"
 This item inserts data from a Unix domain or Internet socket into the expanded
 string. The minimal way of using it uses just two arguments, as in these
@@ -8946,6 +9014,35 @@ non-existent Unix domain socket, or a failure to connect to an Internet socket.
 The &(redirect)& router has an option called &%forbid_filter_readsocket%& which
 locks out the use of this expansion item in filter files.
 
+
+.new
+.vitem &*${reduce{*&<&'string1'&>}{<&'string2'&>&*}{*&<&'string3'&>&*}}*&
+.cindex "expansion" "reducing a list to a scalar"
+.cindex "list" "reducing to a scalar"
+.vindex "&$value$&"
+.vindex "&$item$&"
+This operation reduces a list to a single, scalar string. After expansion,
+<&'string1'&> is interpreted as a list, colon-separated by default, but the
+separator can be changed in the usual way. Then <&'string2'&> is expanded and
+assigned to the &$value$& variable. After this, each item in the <&'string1'&>
+list is assigned to &$item$& in turn, and <&'string3'&> is expanded for each of
+them. The result of that expansion is assigned to &$value$& before the next
+iteration. When the end of the list is reached, the final value of &$value$& is
+added to the expansion output. The &*reduce*& expansion item can be used in a
+number of ways. For example, to add up a list of numbers:
+.code
+${reduce {<, 1,2,3}{0}{${eval:$value+$item}}}
+.endd
+The result of that expansion would be &`6`&. The maximum of a list of numbers
+can be found:
+.code
+${reduce {3:0:9:4:6}{0}{${if >{$item}{$value}{$item}{$value}}}}
+.endd
+At the end of a &*reduce*& expansion, the values of &$item$& and &$value$& are
+restored to what they were before. See also the &*filter*& and &*map*&
+expansion items.
+.wen
+
 .vitem &*$rheader_*&<&'header&~name'&>&*:&~or&~$rh_*&<&'header&~name'&>&*:*&
 This item inserts &"raw"& header lines. It is described with the &%header%&
 expansion item above.
@@ -8959,11 +9056,10 @@ command is run in a separate process, but under the same uid and gid. As in
 other command executions from Exim, a shell is not used by default. If you want
 a shell, you must explicitly code it.
 
-.new
 The standard input for the command exists, but is empty. The standard output
 and standard error are set to the same file descriptor.
 .cindex "return code" "from &%run%& expansion"
-.cindex "&$value$&"
+.vindex "&$value$&"
 If the command succeeds (gives a zero return code) <&'string1'&> is expanded
 and replaces the entire item; during this expansion, the standard output/error
 from the command is in the variable &$value$&. If the command fails,
@@ -8975,9 +9071,8 @@ If <&'string2'&> is absent, the result is empty. Alternatively, <&'string2'&>
 can be the word &"fail"& (not in braces) to force expansion failure if the
 command does not succeed. If both strings are omitted, the result is contents
 of the standard output/error on success, and nothing on failure.
-.wen
 
-.cindex "&$runrc$&"
+.vindex "&$runrc$&"
 The return code from the command is put in the variable &$runrc$&, and this
 remains set afterwards, so in a filter file you can do things like this:
 .code
@@ -9026,7 +9121,7 @@ the regular expression from string expansion.
 
 
 .vitem &*${substr{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}{*&<&'string3'&>&*}}*&
-.cindex "&%substr%&"
+.cindex "&%substr%& expansion item"
 .cindex "substring extraction"
 .cindex "expansion" "substring extraction"
 The three strings are expanded; the first two must yield numbers. Call them
@@ -9110,12 +9205,36 @@ following operations can be performed:
 .vlist
 .vitem &*${address:*&<&'string'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "expansion" "RFC 2822 address handling"
-.cindex "&%address%&" "expansion item"
+.cindex "&%address%& expansion item"
 The string is interpreted as an RFC 2822 address, as it might appear in a
 header line, and the effective address is extracted from it. If the string does
 not parse successfully, the result is empty.
 
 
+.new
+.vitem &*${addresses:*&<&'string'&>&*}*&
+.cindex "expansion" "RFC 2822 address handling"
+.cindex "&%addresses%& expansion item"
+The string (after expansion) is interpreted as a list of addresses in RFC
+2822 format, such as can be found in a &'To:'& or &'Cc:'& header line. The
+operative address (&'local-part@domain'&) is extracted from each item, and the
+result of the expansion is a colon-separated list, with appropriate
+doubling of colons should any happen to be present in the email addresses.
+Syntactically invalid RFC2822 address items are omitted from the output.
+
+It is possible to specify a character other than colon for the output
+separator by starting the string with > followed by the new separator
+character. For example:
+.code
+${addresses:>& Chief <ceo@up.stairs>, sec@base.ment (dogsbody)}
+.endd
+expands to &`ceo@up.stairs&&sec@base.ment`&. Compare the &*address*& (singular)
+expansion item, which extracts the working address from a single RFC2822
+address. See the &*filter*&, &*map*&, and &*reduce*& items for ways of
+processing lists.
+.wen
+
+
 .vitem &*${base62:*&<&'digits'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "&%base62%&"
 .cindex "expansion" "conversion to base 62"
@@ -9154,21 +9273,20 @@ is controlled by the &%print_topbitchars%& option.
 .cindex "expansion" "expression evaluation"
 .cindex "expansion" "arithmetic expression"
 .cindex "&%eval%& expansion item"
-.new
 These items supports simple arithmetic and bitwise logical operations in
 expansion strings. The string (after expansion) must be a conventional
 arithmetic expression, but it is limited to basic arithmetic operators, bitwise
 logical operators, and parentheses. All operations are carried out using
 integer arithmetic. The operator priorities are as follows (the same as in the
 C programming language):
-.table2 90pt 300pt
-.row &~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~&'highest:'& "not (~), negate (-)"
-.row ""   "multiply (*), divide (/), remainder (%)"
-.row ""   "plus (+), minus (-)"
-.row ""   "shift-left (<<), shift-right (>>)"
-.row ""   "and (&&)"
-.row ""   "xor (^)"
-.row &~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~&'lowest:'&  "or (|)"
+.table2 70pt 300pt
+.irow &'highest:'& "not (~), negate (-)"
+.irow ""   "multiply (*), divide (/), remainder (%)"
+.irow ""   "plus (+), minus (-)"
+.irow ""   "shift-left (<<), shift-right (>>)"
+.irow ""   "and (&&)"
+.irow ""   "xor (^)"
+.irow &'lowest:'&  "or (|)"
 .endtable
 Binary operators with the same priority are evaluated from left to right. White
 space is permitted before or after operators.
@@ -9196,7 +9314,6 @@ a decimal representation of the answer (without &"K"& or &"M"&). For example:
 &`${eval:~255&amp;0x1234}    `&  yields 4608
 &`${eval:-(~255&amp;0x1234)} `&  yields -4608
 .endd
-.wen
 
 As a more realistic example, in an ACL you might have
 .code
@@ -9282,7 +9399,7 @@ ${lc:$local_part}
 
 .vitem &*${length_*&<&'number'&>&*:*&<&'string'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "expansion" "string truncation"
-.cindex "&%length%&" "expansion item"
+.cindex "&%length%& expansion item"
 The &%length%& operator is a simpler interface to the &%length%& function that
 can be used when the parameter is a fixed number (as opposed to a string that
 changes when expanded). The effect is the same as
@@ -9413,6 +9530,18 @@ string, using as many &"encoded words"& as necessary to encode all the
 characters.
 
 
+.new
+.vitem &*${rfc2047d:*&<&'string'&>&*}*&
+.cindex "expansion" "RFC 2047"
+.cindex "RFC 2047" "decoding"
+.cindex "&%rfc2047d%& expansion item"
+This operator decodes strings that are encoded as per RFC 2047. Binary zero
+bytes are replaced by question marks. Characters are converted into the
+character set defined by &%headers_charset%&. Overlong RFC 2047 &"words"& are
+not recognized unless &%check_rfc2047_length%& is set false.
+.wen
+
+
 
 .vitem &*${rxquote:*&<&'string'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "quoting" "in regular expressions"
@@ -9539,12 +9668,12 @@ Note that the general negation operator provides for inequality testing. The
 two strings must take the form of optionally signed decimal integers,
 optionally followed by one of the letters &"K"& or &"M"& (in either upper or
 lower case), signifying multiplication by 1024 or 1024*1024, respectively.
-&new("As a special case, the numerical value of an empty string is taken as
-zero.")
+As a special case, the numerical value of an empty string is taken as
+zero.
 
 .vitem &*crypteq&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "expansion" "encrypted comparison"
-.cindex "encrypted strings" "comparing"
+.cindex "encrypted stringscomparing"
 .cindex "&%crypteq%& expansion condition"
 This condition is included in the Exim binary if it is built to support any
 authentication mechanisms (see chapter &<<CHAPSMTPAUTH>>&). Otherwise, it is
@@ -9596,9 +9725,8 @@ systems this is no longer true, and in many cases the entire password is used,
 whatever its length.
 
 .next
-.new
 .cindex "&[crypt16()]&"
-&%{crypt16}%& calls the &[crypt16()]& function, which was orginally created to
+&%{crypt16}%& calls the &[crypt16()]& function, which was originally created to
 use up to 16 characters of the password in some operating systems. Again, in
 modern operating systems, more characters may be used.
 .endlist
@@ -9624,7 +9752,6 @@ comparison, the default is usually either &`{crypt}`& or &`{crypt16}`&, as
 determined by the setting of DEFAULT_CRYPT in &_Local/Makefile_&. The default
 default is &`{crypt}`&. Whatever the default, you can always use either
 function by specifying it explicitly in curly brackets.
-.wen
 
 .vitem &*def:*&<&'variable&~name'&>
 .cindex "expansion" "checking for empty variable"
@@ -9649,19 +9776,15 @@ ${if def:header_reply-to:{$h_reply-to:}{$h_from:}}
 &*Note*&: No &%$%& appears before &%header_%& or &%h_%& in the condition, and
 the header name must be terminated by a colon if white space does not follow.
 
-.vitem &*eq&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
+.vitem &*eq&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*& &&&
+       &*eqi&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "string" "comparison"
 .cindex "expansion" "string comparison"
 .cindex "&%eq%& expansion condition"
-The two substrings are first expanded. The condition is true if the two
-resulting strings are identical, including the case of letters.
-
-.vitem &*eqi&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
-.cindex "string" "comparison"
-.cindex "expansion" "string comparison"
 .cindex "&%eqi%& expansion condition"
 The two substrings are first expanded. The condition is true if the two
-resulting strings are identical when compared in a case-independent way.
+resulting strings are identical. For &%eq%& the comparison includes the case of
+letters, whereas for &%eqi%& the comparison is case-independent.
 
 .vitem &*exists&~{*&<&'file&~name'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "expansion" "file existence test"
@@ -9680,43 +9803,69 @@ users' filter files may be locked out by the system administrator.
 This condition, which has no data, is true during a message's first delivery
 attempt. It is false during any subsequent delivery attempts.
 
-.vitem &*ge&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
-.cindex "&%ge%& expansion condition"
-See &*gei*&.
 
-.vitem &*gei&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
+.new
+.vitem "&*forall{*&<&'a list'&>&*}{*&<&'a condition'&>&*}*&" &&&
+       "&*forany{*&<&'a list'&>&*}{*&<&'a condition'&>&*}*&"
+.cindex "list" "iterative conditions"
+.cindex "expansion" "&*forall*& condition"
+.cindex "expansion" "&*forany*& condition"
+.vindex "&$item$&"
+These conditions iterate over a list. The first argument is expanded to form
+the list. By default, the list separator is a colon, but it can be changed by
+the normal method. The second argument is interpreted as a condition that is to
+be applied to each item in the list in turn. During the interpretation of the
+condition, the current list item is placed in a variable called &$item$&.
+.ilist
+For &*forany*&, interpretation stops if the condition is true for any item, and
+the result of the whole condition is true. If the condition is false for all
+items in the list, the overall condition is false.
+.next
+For &*forall*&, interpretation stops if the condition is false for any item,
+and the result of the whole condition is false. If the condition is true for
+all items in the list, the overall condition is true.
+.endlist
+Note that negation of &*forany*& means that the condition must be false for all
+items for the overall condition to succeed, and negation of &*forall*& means
+that the condition must be false for at least one item. In this example, the
+list separator is changed to a comma:
+.code
+${if forany{<, $recipients}{match{$item}{^user3@}}{yes}{no}}
+.endd
+The value of &$item$& is saved and restored while &*forany*& or &*forall*& is
+being processed, to enable these expansion items to be nested.
+.wen
+
+
+.vitem &*ge&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*& &&&
+       &*gei&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "string" "comparison"
 .cindex "expansion" "string comparison"
+.cindex "&%ge%& expansion condition"
 .cindex "&%gei%& expansion condition"
 The two substrings are first expanded. The condition is true if the first
-string is lexically greater than or equal to the second string: for &%ge%& the
+string is lexically greater than or equal to the second string. For &%ge%& the
 comparison includes the case of letters, whereas for &%gei%& the comparison is
 case-independent.
 
-.vitem &*gt&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
-.cindex "&%gt%& expansion condition"
-See &*gti*&.
-
-.vitem &*gti&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
+.vitem &*gt&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*& &&&
+       &*gti&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "string" "comparison"
 .cindex "expansion" "string comparison"
+.cindex "&%gt%& expansion condition"
 .cindex "&%gti%& expansion condition"
 The two substrings are first expanded. The condition is true if the first
-string is lexically greater than the second string: for &%gt%& the comparison
+string is lexically greater than the second string. For &%gt%& the comparison
 includes the case of letters, whereas for &%gti%& the comparison is
 case-independent.
 
-.vitem &*isip&~{*&<&'string'&>&*}*&
-.cindex "&%isip%& expansion condition"
-See &*isip6*&.
-
-.vitem &*isip4&~{*&<&'string'&>&*}*&
-.cindex "&%isip4%& expansion condition"
-See &*isip6*&.
-
-.vitem &*isip6&~{*&<&'string'&>&*}*&
+.vitem &*isip&~{*&<&'string'&>&*}*&  &&&
+       &*isip4&~{*&<&'string'&>&*}*& &&&
+       &*isip6&~{*&<&'string'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "IP address" "testing string format"
 .cindex "string" "testing for IP address"
+.cindex "&%isip%& expansion condition"
+.cindex "&%isip4%& expansion condition"
 .cindex "&%isip6%& expansion condition"
 The substring is first expanded, and then tested to see if it has the form of
 an IP address. Both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses are valid for &%isip%&, whereas
@@ -9744,29 +9893,25 @@ of SMTP authentication, and chapter &<<CHAPplaintext>>& for an example of how
 this can be used.
 
 
-.vitem &*le&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
-.cindex "&%le%& expansion condition"
-See &*lei*&.
-
-.vitem &*lei&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
+.vitem &*le&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*& &&&
+       &*lei&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "string" "comparison"
 .cindex "expansion" "string comparison"
+.cindex "&%le%& expansion condition"
 .cindex "&%lei%& expansion condition"
 The two substrings are first expanded. The condition is true if the first
-string is lexically less than or equal to the second string: for &%le%& the
+string is lexically less than or equal to the second string. For &%le%& the
 comparison includes the case of letters, whereas for &%lei%& the comparison is
 case-independent.
 
-.vitem &*lt&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
-.cindex "&%lt%& expansion condition"
-See &*lti*&.
-
-.vitem &*lti&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
+.vitem &*lt&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*& &&&
+       &*lti&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "string" "comparison"
 .cindex "expansion" "string comparison"
+.cindex "&%lt%& expansion condition"
 .cindex "&%lti%& expansion condition"
 The two substrings are first expanded. The condition is true if the first
-string is lexically less than the second string: for &%lt%& the comparison
+string is lexically less than the second string. For &%lt%& the comparison
 includes the case of letters, whereas for &%lti%& the comparison is
 case-independent.
 
@@ -9833,7 +9978,9 @@ An empty item, which matches only if the IP address is empty. This could be
 useful for testing for a locally submitted message or one from specific hosts
 in a single test such as
 . ==== As this is a nested list, any displays it contains must be indented
-. ==== as otherwise they are too far to the left.
+. ==== as otherwise they are too far to the left. This comment applies to
+. ==== the use of xmlto plus fop. There's no problem when formatting with
+. ==== sdop, with or without the extra indent.
 .code
   ${if match_ip{$sender_host_address}{:4.3.2.1:...}{...}{...}}
 .endd
@@ -9841,19 +9988,27 @@ where the first item in the list is the empty string.
 .next
 The item @[] matches any of the local host's interface addresses.
 .next
-Lookups are assumed to be &"net-"& style lookups, even if &`net-`& is not
-specified. Thus, the following are equivalent:
+.new
+Single-key lookups are assumed to be like &"net-"& style lookups in host lists,
+even if &`net-`& is not specified. There is never any attempt to turn the IP
+address into a host name. The most common type of linear search for
+&*match_ip*& is likely to be &*iplsearch*&, in which the file can contain CIDR
+masks. For example:
+.code
+  ${if match_ip{$sender_host_address}{iplsearch;/some/file}...
+.endd
+It is of course possible to use other kinds of lookup, and in such a case, you
+do need to specify the &`net-`& prefix if you want to specify a specific
+address mask, for example:
 .code
-  ${if match_ip{$sender_host_address}{lsearch;/some/file}...
-  ${if match_ip{$sender_host_address}{net-lsearch;/some/file}...
+  ${if match_ip{$sender_host_address}{net24-dbm;/some/file}...
 .endd
-You do need to specify the &`net-`& prefix if you want to specify a
-specific address mask, for example, by using &`net24-`&. However, unless you
-are combining a &%match_ip%& condition with others, it is usually neater to use
-an expansion lookup such as:
+However, unless you are combining a &%match_ip%& condition with others, it is
+just as easy to use the fact that a lookup is itself a condition, and write:
 .code
-  ${lookup{${mask:$sender_host_address/24}}lsearch{/some/file}...
+  ${lookup{${mask:$sender_host_address/24}}dbm{/a/file}...
 .endd
+.wen
 .endlist ilist
 
 Consult section &<<SECThoslispatip>>& for further details of these patterns.
@@ -9861,7 +10016,7 @@ Consult section &<<SECThoslispatip>>& for further details of these patterns.
 .vitem &*match_local_part&~{*&<&'string1'&>&*}{*&<&'string2'&>&*}*&
 .cindex "domain list" "in expansion condition"
 .cindex "address list" "in expansion condition"
-.cindex "local part list" "in expansion condition"
+.cindex "local part" "list, in expansion condition"
 .cindex "&%match_local_part%& expansion condition"
 This condition, together with &%match_address%& and &%match_domain%&, make it
 possible to test domain, address, and local part lists within expansions. Each
@@ -9965,7 +10120,7 @@ server_condition = ${if pwcheck{$auth1:$auth2}}
 .vitem &*queue_running*&
 .cindex "queue runner" "detecting when delivering from"
 .cindex "expansion" "queue runner test"
-.cindex "&%queue_runnint%& expansion condition"
+.cindex "&%queue_running%& expansion condition"
 This condition, which has no data, is true during delivery attempts that are
 initiated by queue runner processes, and false otherwise.
 
@@ -10035,7 +10190,7 @@ realm, and how to run the daemon, consult the Cyrus documentation.
 
 
 
-.section "Combining expansion conditions"
+.section "Combining expansion conditions" "SECID84"
 .cindex "expansion" "combining conditions"
 Several conditions can be tested at once by combining them using the &%and%&
 and &%or%& combination conditions. Note that &%and%& and &%or%& are complete
@@ -10073,7 +10228,7 @@ parsed but not evaluated.
 
 
 .section "Expansion variables" "SECTexpvar"
-.cindex "expansion variables" "list of"
+.cindex "expansion" "variables, list of"
 This section contains an alphabetical list of all the expansion variables. Some
 of them are available only when Exim is compiled with specific options such as
 support for TLS or the content scanning extension.
@@ -10081,32 +10236,43 @@ support for TLS or the content scanning extension.
 .vlist
 .vitem "&$0$&, &$1$&, etc"
 .cindex "numerical variables (&$1$& &$2$& etc)"
+.new
 When a &%match%& expansion condition succeeds, these variables contain the
 captured substrings identified by the regular expression during subsequent
-processing of the success string of the containing &%if%& expansion item. They
-may also be set externally by some other matching process which precedes the
-expansion of the string. For example, the commands available in Exim filter
-files include an &%if%& command with its own regular expression matching
-condition.
-
-.vitem "&$acl_c0$& &-- &$acl_c19$&"
-Values can be placed in these variables by the &%set%& modifier in an ACL. The
-values persist throughout the lifetime of an SMTP connection. They can be used
-to pass information between ACLs and between different invocations of the same
-ACL. When a message is received, the values of these variables are saved with
-the message, and can be accessed by filters, routers, and transports during
-subsequent delivery.
+processing of the success string of the containing &%if%& expansion item.
+However, they do not retain their values afterwards; in fact, their previous
+values are restored at the end of processing an &%if%& item. The numerical
+variables may also be set externally by some other matching process which
+precedes the expansion of the string. For example, the commands available in
+Exim filter files include an &%if%& command with its own regular expression
+matching condition.
+.wen
 
-.vitem "&$acl_m0$& &-- &$acl_m19$&"
+.new
+.vitem "&$acl_c...$&"
 Values can be placed in these variables by the &%set%& modifier in an ACL. They
-retain their values while a message is being received, but are reset
-afterwards. They are also reset by MAIL, RSET, EHLO, HELO, and after starting a
-TLS session. When a message is received, the values of these variables are
-saved with the message, and can be accessed by filters, routers, and transports
+can be given any name that starts with &$acl_c$& and is at least six characters
+long, but the sixth character must be either a digit or an underscore. For
+example: &$acl_c5$&, &$acl_c_mycount$&. The values of the &$acl_c...$&
+variables persist throughout the lifetime of an SMTP connection. They can be
+used to pass information between ACLs and between different invocations of the
+same ACL. When a message is received, the values of these variables are saved
+with the message, and can be accessed by filters, routers, and transports
 during subsequent delivery.
 
+.vitem "&$acl_m...$&"
+These variables are like the &$acl_c...$& variables, except that their values
+are reset after a message has been received. Thus, if several messages are
+received in one SMTP connection, &$acl_m...$& values are not passed on from one
+message to the next, as &$acl_c...$& values are. The &$acl_m...$& variables are
+also reset by MAIL, RSET, EHLO, HELO, and after starting a TLS session. When a
+message is received, the values of these variables are saved with the message,
+and can be accessed by filters, routers, and transports during subsequent
+delivery.
+.wen
+
 .vitem &$acl_verify_message$&
-.cindex "&$acl_verify_message$&"
+.vindex "&$acl_verify_message$&"
 After an address verification has failed, this variable contains the failure
 message. It retains its value for use in subsequent modifiers. The message can
 be preserved by coding like this:
@@ -10119,7 +10285,7 @@ You can use &$acl_verify_message$& during the expansion of the &%message%& or
 failure.
 
 .vitem &$address_data$&
-.cindex "&$address_data$&"
+.vindex "&$address_data$&"
 This variable is set by means of the &%address_data%& option in routers. The
 value then remains with the address while it is processed by subsequent routers
 and eventually a transport. If the transport is handling multiple addresses,
@@ -10144,7 +10310,7 @@ after the end of the current ACL statement. If you want to preserve
 these values for longer, you can save them in ACL variables.
 
 .vitem &$address_file$&
-.cindex "&$address_file$&"
+.vindex "&$address_file$&"
 When, as a result of aliasing, forwarding, or filtering, a message is directed
 to a specific file, this variable holds the name of the file when the transport
 is running. At other times, the variable is empty. For example, using the
@@ -10153,26 +10319,25 @@ default configuration, if user &%r2d2%& has a &_.forward_& file containing
 /home/r2d2/savemail
 .endd
 then when the &(address_file)& transport is running, &$address_file$&
-contains &"/home/r2d2/savemail"&.
-
+contains the text string &`/home/r2d2/savemail`&.
 .cindex "Sieve filter" "value of &$address_file$&"
 For Sieve filters, the value may be &"inbox"& or a relative folder name. It is
 then up to the transport configuration to generate an appropriate absolute path
 to the relevant file.
 
 .vitem &$address_pipe$&
-.cindex "&$address_pipe$&"
+.vindex "&$address_pipe$&"
 When, as a result of aliasing or forwarding, a message is directed to a pipe,
 this variable holds the pipe command when the transport is running.
 
 .vitem "&$auth1$& &-- &$auth3$&"
-.cindex "&$auth1$&, &$auth2$&, etc"
+.vindex "&$auth1$&, &$auth2$&, etc"
 These variables are used in SMTP authenticators (see chapters
 &<<CHAPplaintext>>&&--&<<CHAPspa>>&). Elsewhere, they are empty.
 
 .vitem &$authenticated_id$&
 .cindex "authentication" "id"
-.cindex "&$authenticated_id$&"
+.vindex "&$authenticated_id$&"
 When a server successfully authenticates a client it may be configured to
 preserve some of the authentication information in the variable
 &$authenticated_id$& (see chapter &<<CHAPSMTPAUTH>>&). For example, a
@@ -10191,7 +10356,7 @@ command line option.
 .cindex "sender" "authenticated"
 .cindex "authentication" "sender"
 .cindex "AUTH" "on MAIL command"
-.cindex "&$authenticated_sender$&"
+.vindex "&$authenticated_sender$&"
 When acting as a server, Exim takes note of the AUTH= parameter on an incoming
 SMTP MAIL command if it believes the sender is sufficiently trusted, as
 described in section &<<SECTauthparamail>>&. Unless the data is the string
@@ -10199,7 +10364,7 @@ described in section &<<SECTauthparamail>>&. Unless the data is the string
 available during delivery in the &$authenticated_sender$& variable. If the
 sender is not trusted, Exim accepts the syntax of AUTH=, but ignores the data.
 
-.cindex "&$qualify_domain$&"
+.vindex "&$qualify_domain$&"
 When a message is submitted locally (that is, not over a TCP connection), the
 value of &$authenticated_sender$& is an address constructed from the login
 name of the calling process and &$qualify_domain$&, except that a trusted user
@@ -10208,7 +10373,7 @@ can override this by means of the &%-oMas%& command line option.
 
 .vitem &$authentication_failed$&
 .cindex "authentication" "failure"
-.cindex "&$authentication_failed$&"
+.vindex "&$authentication_failed$&"
 This variable is set to &"1"& in an Exim server if a client issues an AUTH
 command that does not succeed. Otherwise it is set to &"0"&. This makes it
 possible to distinguish between &"did not try to authenticate"&
@@ -10221,7 +10386,7 @@ an undefined mechanism.
 .vitem &$body_linecount$&
 .cindex "message body" "line count"
 .cindex "body of message" "line count"
-.cindex "&$body_linecount$&"
+.vindex "&$body_linecount$&"
 When a message is being received or delivered, this variable contains the
 number of lines in the message's body. See also &$message_linecount$&.
 
@@ -10229,25 +10394,25 @@ number of lines in the message's body. See also &$message_linecount$&.
 .cindex "message body" "binary zero count"
 .cindex "body of message" "binary zero count"
 .cindex "binary zero" "in message body"
-.cindex "&$body_zerocount$&"
+.vindex "&$body_zerocount$&"
 When a message is being received or delivered, this variable contains the
 number of binary zero bytes in the message's body.
 
 .vitem &$bounce_recipient$&
-.cindex "&$bounce_recipient$&"
+.vindex "&$bounce_recipient$&"
 This is set to the recipient address of a bounce message while Exim is creating
 it. It is useful if a customized bounce message text file is in use (see
 chapter &<<CHAPemsgcust>>&).
 
 .vitem &$bounce_return_size_limit$&
-.cindex "&$bounce_return_size_limit$&"
+.vindex "&$bounce_return_size_limit$&"
 This contains the value set in the &%bounce_return_size_limit%& option, rounded
 up to a multiple of 1000. It is useful when a customized error message text
 file is in use (see chapter &<<CHAPemsgcust>>&).
 
 .vitem &$caller_gid$&
 .cindex "gid (group id)" "caller"
-.cindex "&$caller_gid$&"
+.vindex "&$caller_gid$&"
 The real group id under which the process that called Exim was running. This is
 not the same as the group id of the originator of a message (see
 &$originator_gid$&). If Exim re-execs itself, this variable in the new
@@ -10255,30 +10420,30 @@ incarnation normally contains the Exim gid.
 
 .vitem &$caller_uid$&
 .cindex "uid (user id)" "caller"
-.cindex "&$caller_uid$&"
+.vindex "&$caller_uid$&"
 The real user id under which the process that called Exim was running. This is
 not the same as the user id of the originator of a message (see
 &$originator_uid$&). If Exim re-execs itself, this variable in the new
 incarnation normally contains the Exim uid.
 
 .vitem &$compile_date$&
-.cindex "&$compile_date$&"
+.vindex "&$compile_date$&"
 The date on which the Exim binary was compiled.
 
 .vitem &$compile_number$&
-.cindex "&$compile_number$&"
+.vindex "&$compile_number$&"
 The building process for Exim keeps a count of the number
 of times it has been compiled. This serves to distinguish different
 compilations of the same version of the program.
 
 .vitem &$demime_errorlevel$&
-.cindex "&$demime_errorlevel$&"
+.vindex "&$demime_errorlevel$&"
 This variable is available when Exim is compiled with
 the content-scanning extension and the obsolete &%demime%& condition. For
 details, see section &<<SECTdemimecond>>&.
 
 .vitem &$demime_reason$&
-.cindex "&$demime_reason$&"
+.vindex "&$demime_reason$&"
 This variable is available when Exim is compiled with the
 content-scanning extension and the obsolete &%demime%& condition. For details,
 see section &<<SECTdemimecond>>&.
@@ -10286,30 +10451,28 @@ see section &<<SECTdemimecond>>&.
 
 .vitem &$dnslist_domain$&
 .cindex "black list (DNS)"
-.cindex "&$dnslist_domain$&"
+.vindex "&$dnslist_domain$&"
 When a client host is found to be on a DNS (black) list,
 the list's domain name is put into this variable so that it can be included in
 the rejection message.
 
 .vitem &$dnslist_text$&
-.cindex "&$dnslist_text$&"
+.vindex "&$dnslist_text$&"
 When a client host is found to be on a DNS (black) list, the
 contents of any associated TXT record are placed in this variable.
 
 .vitem &$dnslist_value$&
-.cindex "&$dnslist_value$&"
+.vindex "&$dnslist_value$&"
 When a client host is found to be on a DNS (black) list,
 the IP address from the resource record is placed in this variable.
 If there are multiple records, all the addresses are included, comma-space
 separated.
 
 .vitem &$domain$&
-.new
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
 When an address is being routed, or delivered on its own, this variable
 contains the domain. Uppercase letters in the domain are converted into lower
 case for &$domain$&.
-.wen
 
 Global address rewriting happens when a message is received, so the value of
 &$domain$& during routing and delivery is the value after rewriting. &$domain$&
@@ -10361,7 +10524,7 @@ the complete argument of the ETRN command (see section &<<SECTETRN>>&).
 
 
 .vitem &$domain_data$&
-.cindex "&$domain_data$&"
+.vindex "&$domain_data$&"
 When the &%domains%& option on a router matches a domain by
 means of a lookup, the data read by the lookup is available during the running
 of the router as &$domain_data$&. In addition, if the driver routes the
@@ -10375,19 +10538,19 @@ the rest of the ACL statement. In all other situations, this variable expands
 to nothing.
 
 .vitem &$exim_gid$&
-.cindex "&$exim_gid$&"
+.vindex "&$exim_gid$&"
 This variable contains the numerical value of the Exim group id.
 
 .vitem &$exim_path$&
-.cindex "&$exim_path$&"
+.vindex "&$exim_path$&"
 This variable contains the path to the Exim binary.
 
 .vitem &$exim_uid$&
-.cindex "&$exim_uid$&"
+.vindex "&$exim_uid$&"
 This variable contains the numerical value of the Exim user id.
 
 .vitem &$found_extension$&
-.cindex "&$found_extension$&"
+.vindex "&$found_extension$&"
 This variable is available when Exim is compiled with the
 content-scanning extension and the obsolete &%demime%& condition. For details,
 see section &<<SECTdemimecond>>&.
@@ -10399,7 +10562,7 @@ be terminated by colon or white space, because it may contain a wide variety of
 characters. Note also that braces must &'not'& be used.
 
 .vitem &$home$&
-.cindex "&$home$&"
+.vindex "&$home$&"
 When the &%check_local_user%& option is set for a router, the user's home
 directory is placed in &$home$& when the check succeeds. In particular, this
 means it is set during the running of users' filter files. A router may also
@@ -10410,7 +10573,7 @@ When running a filter test via the &%-bf%& option, &$home$& is set to the value
 of the environment variable HOME.
 
 .vitem &$host$&
-.cindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
 If a router assigns an address to a transport (any transport), and passes a
 list of hosts with the address, the value of &$host$& when the transport starts
 to run is the name of the first host on the list. Note that this applies both
@@ -10431,13 +10594,13 @@ client is connected.
 
 
 .vitem &$host_address$&
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 This variable is set to the remote host's IP address whenever &$host$& is set
 for a remote connection. It is also set to the IP address that is being checked
 when the &%ignore_target_hosts%& option is being processed.
 
 .vitem &$host_data$&
-.cindex "&$host_data$&"
+.vindex "&$host_data$&"
 If a &%hosts%& condition in an ACL is satisfied by means of a lookup, the
 result of the lookup is made available in the &$host_data$& variable. This
 allows you, for example, to do things like this:
@@ -10446,8 +10609,8 @@ deny  hosts = net-lsearch;/some/file
 message = $host_data
 .endd
 .vitem &$host_lookup_deferred$&
-.cindex "host name lookup" "failure of"
-.cindex "&$host_lookup_deferred$&"
+.cindex "host name" "lookup, failure of"
+.vindex "&$host_lookup_deferred$&"
 This variable normally contains &"0"&, as does &$host_lookup_failed$&. When a
 message comes from a remote host and there is an attempt to look up the host's
 name from its IP address, and the attempt is not successful, one of these
@@ -10475,41 +10638,48 @@ the result, the name is not accepted, and &$host_lookup_deferred$& is set to
 &"1"&. See also &$sender_host_name$&.
 
 .vitem &$host_lookup_failed$&
-.cindex "&$host_lookup_failed$&"
+.vindex "&$host_lookup_failed$&"
 See &$host_lookup_deferred$&.
 
 
 .vitem &$inode$&
-.cindex "&$inode$&"
+.vindex "&$inode$&"
 The only time this variable is set is while expanding the &%directory_file%&
 option in the &(appendfile)& transport. The variable contains the inode number
 of the temporary file which is about to be renamed. It can be used to construct
 a unique name for the file.
 
-.new
 .vitem &$interface_address$&
-.cindex "&$interface_address$&"
+.vindex "&$interface_address$&"
 This is an obsolete name for &$received_ip_address$&.
 
 .vitem &$interface_port$&
-.cindex "&$interface_port$&"
+.vindex "&$interface_port$&"
 This is an obsolete name for &$received_port$&.
+
+.new
+.vitem &$item$&
+.vindex "&$item$&"
+This variable is used during the expansion of &*forall*& and &*forany*&
+conditions (see section &<<SECTexpcond>>&), and &*filter*&, &*man*&, and
+&*reduce*& items (see section &<<SECTexpcond>>&). In other circumstances, it is
+empty.
 .wen
 
 .vitem &$ldap_dn$&
-.cindex "&$ldap_dn$&"
+.vindex "&$ldap_dn$&"
 This variable, which is available only when Exim is compiled with LDAP support,
 contains the DN from the last entry in the most recently successful LDAP
 lookup.
 
 .vitem &$load_average$&
-.cindex "&$load_average$&"
+.vindex "&$load_average$&"
 This variable contains the system load average, multiplied by 1000 to that it
 is an integer. For example, if the load average is 0.21, the value of the
 variable is 210. The value is recomputed every time the variable is referenced.
 
 .vitem &$local_part$&
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 When an address is being routed, or delivered on its own, this
 variable contains the local part. When a number of addresses are being
 delivered together (for example, multiple RCPT commands in an SMTP
@@ -10521,8 +10691,8 @@ Global address rewriting happens when a message is received, so the value of
 because a message may have many recipients and the system filter is called just
 once.
 
-.cindex "&$local_part_prefix$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part_suffix$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_prefix$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_suffix$&"
 If a local part prefix or suffix has been recognized, it is not included in the
 value of &$local_part$& during routing and subsequent delivery. The values of
 any prefix or suffix are in &$local_part_prefix$& and
@@ -10561,7 +10731,7 @@ to process local parts in a case-dependent manner in a router, you can set the
 &%caseful_local_part%& option (see chapter &<<CHAProutergeneric>>&).
 
 .vitem &$local_part_data$&
-.cindex "&$local_part_data$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_data$&"
 When the &%local_parts%& option on a router matches a local part by means of a
 lookup, the data read by the lookup is available during the running of the
 router as &$local_part_data$&. In addition, if the driver routes the address
@@ -10574,28 +10744,28 @@ available during the rest of the ACL statement. In all other situations, this
 variable expands to nothing.
 
 .vitem &$local_part_prefix$&
-.cindex "&$local_part_prefix$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_prefix$&"
 When an address is being routed or delivered, and a
 specific prefix for the local part was recognized, it is available in this
 variable, having been removed from &$local_part$&.
 
 .vitem &$local_part_suffix$&
-.cindex "&$local_part_suffix$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_suffix$&"
 When an address is being routed or delivered, and a
 specific suffix for the local part was recognized, it is available in this
 variable, having been removed from &$local_part$&.
 
 .vitem &$local_scan_data$&
-.cindex "&$local_scan_data$&"
+.vindex "&$local_scan_data$&"
 This variable contains the text returned by the &[local_scan()]& function when
 a message is received. See chapter &<<CHAPlocalscan>>& for more details.
 
 .vitem &$local_user_gid$&
-.cindex "&$local_user_gid$&"
+.vindex "&$local_user_gid$&"
 See &$local_user_uid$&.
 
 .vitem &$local_user_uid$&
-.cindex "&$local_user_uid$&"
+.vindex "&$local_user_uid$&"
 This variable and &$local_user_gid$& are set to the uid and gid after the
 &%check_local_user%& router precondition succeeds. This means that their values
 are available for the remaining preconditions (&%senders%&, &%require_files%&,
@@ -10604,20 +10774,20 @@ router-specific expansions. At all other times, the values in these variables
 are &`(uid_t)(-1)`& and &`(gid_t)(-1)`&, respectively.
 
 .vitem &$localhost_number$&
-.cindex "&$localhost_number$&"
+.vindex "&$localhost_number$&"
 This contains the expanded value of the
 &%localhost_number%& option. The expansion happens after the main options have
 been read.
 
 .vitem &$log_inodes$&
-.cindex "&$log_inodes$&"
+.vindex "&$log_inodes$&"
 The number of free inodes in the disk partition where Exim's
 log files are being written. The value is recalculated whenever the variable is
 referenced. If the relevant file system does not have the concept of inodes,
 the value of is -1. See also the &%check_log_inodes%& option.
 
 .vitem &$log_space$&
-.cindex "&$log_space$&"
+.vindex "&$log_space$&"
 The amount of free space (as a number of kilobytes) in the disk
 partition where Exim's log files are being written. The value is recalculated
 whenever the variable is referenced. If the operating system does not have the
@@ -10626,7 +10796,7 @@ the space value is -1. See also the &%check_log_space%& option.
 
 
 .vitem &$mailstore_basename$&
-.cindex "&$mailstore_basename$&"
+.vindex "&$mailstore_basename$&"
 This variable is set only when doing deliveries in &"mailstore"& format in the
 &(appendfile)& transport. During the expansion of the &%mailstore_prefix%&,
 &%mailstore_suffix%&, &%message_prefix%&, and &%message_suffix%& options, it
@@ -10635,7 +10805,7 @@ without the &".tmp"&, &".env"&, or &".msg"& suffix. At all other times, this
 variable is empty.
 
 .vitem &$malware_name$&
-.cindex "&$malware_name$&"
+.vindex "&$malware_name$&"
 This variable is available when Exim is compiled with the
 content-scanning extension. It is set to the name of the virus that was found
 when the ACL &%malware%& condition is true (see section &<<SECTscanvirus>>&).
@@ -10643,7 +10813,7 @@ when the ACL &%malware%& condition is true (see section &<<SECTscanvirus>>&).
 
 .vitem &$message_age$&
 .cindex "message" "age of"
-.cindex "&$message_age$&"
+.vindex "&$message_age$&"
 This variable is set at the start of a delivery attempt to contain the number
 of seconds since the message was received. It does not change during a single
 delivery attempt.
@@ -10652,7 +10822,7 @@ delivery attempt.
 .cindex "body of message" "expansion variable"
 .cindex "message body" "in expansion"
 .cindex "binary zero" "in message body"
-.cindex "&$message_body$&"
+.vindex "&$message_body$&"
 This variable contains the initial portion of a message's
 body while it is being delivered, and is intended mainly for use in filter
 files. The maximum number of characters of the body that are put into the
@@ -10664,7 +10834,7 @@ Binary zeros are also converted into spaces.
 .vitem &$message_body_end$&
 .cindex "body of message" "expansion variable"
 .cindex "message body" "in expansion"
-.cindex "&$message_body_end$&"
+.vindex "&$message_body_end$&"
 This variable contains the final portion of a message's
 body while it is being delivered. The format and maximum size are as for
 &$message_body$&.
@@ -10672,14 +10842,14 @@ body while it is being delivered. The format and maximum size are as for
 .vitem &$message_body_size$&
 .cindex "body of message" "size"
 .cindex "message body" "size"
-.cindex "&$message_body_size$&"
+.vindex "&$message_body_size$&"
 When a message is being delivered, this variable contains the size of the body
 in bytes. The count starts from the character after the blank line that
 separates the body from the header. Newlines are included in the count. See
 also &$message_size$&, &$body_linecount$&, and &$body_zerocount$&.
 
 .vitem &$message_exim_id$&
-.cindex "&$message_exim_id$&"
+.vindex "&$message_exim_id$&"
 When a message is being received or delivered, this variable contains the
 unique message id that is generated and used by Exim to identify the message.
 An id is not created for a message until after its header has been successfully
@@ -10688,24 +10858,22 @@ line; it is the local id that Exim assigns to the message, for example:
 &`1BXTIK-0001yO-VA`&.
 
 .vitem &$message_headers$&
-.new
-.cindex &$message_headers$&
+.vindex &$message_headers$&
 This variable contains a concatenation of all the header lines when a message
 is being processed, except for lines added by routers or transports. The header
 lines are separated by newline characters. Their contents are decoded in the
 same way as a header line that is inserted by &%bheader%&.
 
 .vitem &$message_headers_raw$&
-.cindex &$message_headers_raw$&
+.vindex &$message_headers_raw$&
 This variable is like &$message_headers$& except that no processing of the
 contents of header lines is done.
-.wen
 
 .vitem &$message_id$&
 This is an old name for &$message_exim_id$&, which is now deprecated.
 
 .vitem &$message_linecount$&
-.cindex "&$message_linecount$&"
+.vindex "&$message_linecount$&"
 This variable contains the total number of lines in the header and body of the
 message. Compare &$body_linecount$&, which is the count for the body only.
 During the DATA and content-scanning ACLs, &$message_linecount$& contains the
@@ -10718,7 +10886,7 @@ a DATA ACL:
 .code
 deny message   = Too many lines in message header
      condition = \
-       ${if <{250}{${eval:$message_linecount - $body_linecount}}}
+      ${if <{250}{${eval:$message_linecount - $body_linecount}}}
 .endd
 In the MAIL and RCPT ACLs, the value is zero because at that stage the
 message has not yet been received.
@@ -10726,7 +10894,7 @@ message has not yet been received.
 .vitem &$message_size$&
 .cindex "size" "of message"
 .cindex "message" "size"
-.cindex "&$message_size$&"
+.vindex "&$message_size$&"
 When a message is being processed, this variable contains its size in bytes. In
 most cases, the size includes those headers that were received with the
 message, but not those (such as &'Envelope-to:'&) that are added to individual
@@ -10751,8 +10919,8 @@ These variables are counters that can be incremented by means
 of the &%add%& command in filter files.
 
 .vitem &$original_domain$&
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
-.cindex "&$original_domain$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$original_domain$&"
 When a top-level address is being processed for delivery, this contains the
 same value as &$domain$&. However, if a &"child"& address (for example,
 generated by an alias, forward, or filter file) is being processed, this
@@ -10766,8 +10934,8 @@ filter, it is set up with an artificial &"parent"& address. This has the local
 part &'system-filter'& and the default qualify domain.
 
 .vitem &$original_local_part$&
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
-.cindex "&$original_local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$original_local_part$&"
 When a top-level address is being processed for delivery, this contains the
 same value as &$local_part$&, unless a prefix or suffix was removed from the
 local part, because &$original_local_part$& always contains the full local
@@ -10788,8 +10956,8 @@ part &'system-filter'& and the default qualify domain.
 .vitem &$originator_gid$&
 .cindex "gid (group id)" "of originating user"
 .cindex "sender" "gid"
-.cindex "&$caller_gid$&"
-.cindex "&$originator_gid$&"
+.vindex "&$caller_gid$&"
+.vindex "&$originator_gid$&"
 This variable contains the value of &$caller_gid$& that was set when the
 message was received. For messages received via the command line, this is the
 gid of the sending user. For messages received by SMTP over TCP/IP, this is
@@ -10798,32 +10966,32 @@ normally the gid of the Exim user.
 .vitem &$originator_uid$&
 .cindex "uid (user id)" "of originating user"
 .cindex "sender" "uid"
-.cindex "&$caller_uid$&"
-.cindex "&$originaltor_uid$&"
+.vindex "&$caller_uid$&"
+.vindex "&$originaltor_uid$&"
 The value of &$caller_uid$& that was set when the message was received. For
 messages received via the command line, this is the uid of the sending user.
 For messages received by SMTP over TCP/IP, this is normally the uid of the Exim
 user.
 
 .vitem &$parent_domain$&
-.cindex "&$parent_domain$&"
+.vindex "&$parent_domain$&"
 This variable is similar to &$original_domain$& (see
 above), except that it refers to the immediately preceding parent address.
 
 .vitem &$parent_local_part$&
-.cindex "&$parent_local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$parent_local_part$&"
 This variable is similar to &$original_local_part$&
 (see above), except that it refers to the immediately preceding parent address.
 
 .vitem &$pid$&
 .cindex "pid (process id)" "of current process"
-.cindex "&$pid$&"
+.vindex "&$pid$&"
 This variable contains the current process id.
 
 .vitem &$pipe_addresses$&
 .cindex "filter" "transport filter"
 .cindex "transport" "filter"
-.cindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
+.vindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
 This is not an expansion variable, but is mentioned here because the string
 &`$pipe_addresses`& is handled specially in the command specification for the
 &(pipe)& transport (chapter &<<CHAPpipetransport>>&) and in transport filters
@@ -10832,7 +11000,7 @@ It cannot be used in general expansion strings, and provokes an &"unknown
 variable"& error if encountered.
 
 .vitem &$primary_hostname$&
-.cindex "&$primary_hostname$&"
+.vindex "&$primary_hostname$&"
 This variable contains the value set by &%primary_hostname%& in the
 configuration file, or read by the &[uname()]& function. If &[uname()]& returns
 a single-component name, Exim calls &[gethostbyname()]& (or
@@ -10856,50 +11024,49 @@ which is described in sections &<<SECTexpansionitems>>& and
 &<<SECTverifyPRVS>>&.
 
 .vitem &$qualify_domain$&
-.cindex "&$qualify_domain$&"
+.vindex "&$qualify_domain$&"
 The value set for the &%qualify_domain%& option in the configuration file.
 
 .vitem &$qualify_recipient$&
-.cindex "&$qualify_recipient$&"
+.vindex "&$qualify_recipient$&"
 The value set for the &%qualify_recipient%& option in the configuration file,
 or if not set, the value of &$qualify_domain$&.
 
 .vitem &$rcpt_count$&
-.cindex "&$rcpt_count$&"
+.vindex "&$rcpt_count$&"
 When a message is being received by SMTP, this variable contains the number of
 RCPT commands received for the current message. If this variable is used in a
 RCPT ACL, its value includes the current command.
 
 .vitem &$rcpt_defer_count$&
-.cindex "&$rcpt_defer_count$&"
+.vindex "&$rcpt_defer_count$&"
 .cindex "4&'xx'& responses" "count of"
 When a message is being received by SMTP, this variable contains the number of
 RCPT commands in the current message that have previously been rejected with a
 temporary (4&'xx'&) response.
 
 .vitem &$rcpt_fail_count$&
-.cindex "&$rcpt_fail_count$&"
+.vindex "&$rcpt_fail_count$&"
 When a message is being received by SMTP, this variable contains the number of
 RCPT commands in the current message that have previously been rejected with a
 permanent (5&'xx'&) response.
 
 .vitem &$received_count$&
-.cindex "&$received_count$&"
+.vindex "&$received_count$&"
 This variable contains the number of &'Received:'& header lines in the message,
 including the one added by Exim (so its value is always greater than zero). It
 is available in the DATA ACL, the non-SMTP ACL, and while routing and
 delivering.
 
 .vitem &$received_for$&
-.cindex "&$received_for$&"
+.vindex "&$received_for$&"
 If there is only a single recipient address in an incoming message, this
 variable contains that address when the &'Received:'& header line is being
 built. The value is copied after recipient rewriting has happened, but before
 the &[local_scan()]& function is run.
 
-.new
 .vitem &$received_ip_address$&
-.cindex "&$received_ip_address$&"
+.vindex "&$received_ip_address$&"
 As soon as an Exim server starts processing an incoming TCP/IP connection, this
 variable is set to the address of the local IP interface, and &$received_port$&
 is set to the local port number. (The remote IP address and port are in
@@ -10919,12 +11086,11 @@ the values are unknown (unless they are explicitly set by options of the
 &(smtp)& transport).
 
 .vitem &$received_port$&
-.cindex "&$received_port$&"
+.vindex "&$received_port$&"
 See &$received_ip_address$&.
-.wen
 
 .vitem &$received_protocol$&
-.cindex "&$received_protocol$&"
+.vindex "&$received_protocol$&"
 When a message is being processed, this variable contains the name of the
 protocol by which it was received. Most of the names used by Exim are defined
 by RFCs 821, 2821, and 3848. They start with &"smtp"& (the client used HELO) or
@@ -10945,12 +11111,12 @@ messages that are injected locally by trusted callers. This is commonly used to
 identify messages that are being re-injected after some kind of scanning.
 
 .vitem &$received_time$&
-.cindex "&$received_time$&"
+.vindex "&$received_time$&"
 This variable contains the date and time when the current message was received,
 as a number of seconds since the start of the Unix epoch.
 
 .vitem &$recipient_data$&
-.cindex "&$recipient_data$&"
+.vindex "&$recipient_data$&"
 This variable is set after an indexing lookup success in an ACL &%recipients%&
 condition. It contains the data from the lookup, and the value remains set
 until the next &%recipients%& test. Thus, you can do things like this:
@@ -10964,7 +11130,7 @@ The variable is not set for a lookup that is used as part of the string
 expansion that all such lists undergo before being interpreted.
 
 .vitem &$recipient_verify_failure$&
-.cindex "&$recipient_verify_failure$&"
+.vindex "&$recipient_verify_failure$&"
 In an ACL, when a recipient verification fails, this variable contains
 information about the failure. It is set to one of the following words:
 
@@ -10991,12 +11157,12 @@ The main use of this variable is expected to be to distinguish between
 rejections of MAIL and rejections of RCPT.
 
 .vitem &$recipients$&
-.cindex "&$recipients$&"
-This variable contains a list of envelope recipients for a
-message. A comma and a space separate the addresses in the replacement text.
-However, the variable is not generally available, to prevent exposure of Bcc
-recipients in unprivileged users' filter files. You can use &$recipients$& only
-in these two cases:
+.vindex "&$recipients$&"
+This variable contains a list of envelope recipients for a message. A comma and
+a space separate the addresses in the replacement text. However, the variable
+is not generally available, to prevent exposure of Bcc recipients in
+unprivileged users' filter files. You can use &$recipients$& only in these
+cases:
 
 .olist
 In a system filter file.
@@ -11005,11 +11171,15 @@ In the ACLs associated with the DATA command and with non-SMTP messages, that
 is, the ACLs defined by &%acl_smtp_predata%&, &%acl_smtp_data%&,
 &%acl_smtp_mime%&, &%acl_not_smtp_start%&, &%acl_not_smtp%&, and
 &%acl_not_smtp_mime%&.
+.next
+.new
+From within a &[local_scan()]& function.
+.wen
 .endlist
 
 
 .vitem &$recipients_count$&
-.cindex "&$recipients_count$&"
+.vindex "&$recipients_count$&"
 When a message is being processed, this variable contains the number of
 envelope recipients that came with the message. Duplicates are not excluded
 from the count. While a message is being received over SMTP, the number
@@ -11017,13 +11187,13 @@ increases for each accepted recipient. It can be referenced in an ACL.
 
 
 .vitem &$regex_match_string$&
-.cindex "&$regex_match_string$&"
+.vindex "&$regex_match_string$&"
 This variable is set to contain the matching regular expression after a
 &%regex%& ACL condition has matched (see section &<<SECTscanregex>>&).
 
 
 .vitem &$reply_address$&
-.cindex "&$reply_address$&"
+.vindex "&$reply_address$&"
 When a message is being processed, this variable contains the contents of the
 &'Reply-To:'& header line if one exists and it is not empty, or otherwise the
 contents of the &'From:'& header line. Apart from the removal of leading
@@ -11031,7 +11201,7 @@ white space, the value is not processed in any way. In particular, no RFC 2047
 decoding or character code translation takes place.
 
 .vitem &$return_path$&
-.cindex "&$return_path$&"
+.vindex "&$return_path$&"
 When a message is being delivered, this variable contains the return path &--
 the sender field that will be sent as part of the envelope. It is not enclosed
 in <> characters. At the start of routing an address, &$return_path$& has the
@@ -11044,12 +11214,12 @@ the incoming envelope sender, and &$return_path$& contains the outgoing
 envelope sender.
 
 .vitem &$return_size_limit$&
-.cindex "&$return_size_limit$&"
+.vindex "&$return_size_limit$&"
 This is an obsolete name for &$bounce_return_size_limit$&.
 
 .vitem &$runrc$&
 .cindex "return code" "from &%run%& expansion"
-.cindex "&$runrc$&"
+.vindex "&$runrc$&"
 This variable contains the return code from a command that is run by the
 &%${run...}%& expansion item. &*Warning*&: In a router or transport, you cannot
 assume the order in which option values are expanded, except for those
@@ -11059,7 +11229,7 @@ another.
 
 .vitem &$self_hostname$&
 .cindex "&%self%& option" "value of host name"
-.cindex "&$self_hostname$&"
+.vindex "&$self_hostname$&"
 When an address is routed to a supposedly remote host that turns out to be the
 local host, what happens is controlled by the &%self%& generic router option.
 One of its values causes the address to be passed to another router. When this
@@ -11067,17 +11237,15 @@ happens, &$self_hostname$& is set to the name of the local host that the
 original router encountered. In other circumstances its contents are null.
 
 .vitem &$sender_address$&
-.new
-.cindex "&$sender_address$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_address$&"
 When a message is being processed, this variable contains the sender's address
 that was received in the message's envelope. The case of letters in the address
 is retained, in both the local part and the domain. For bounce messages, the
 value of this variable is the empty string. See also &$return_path$&.
-.wen
 
 .vitem &$sender_address_data$&
-.cindex "&$address_data$&"
-.cindex "&$sender_address_data$&"
+.vindex "&$address_data$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_address_data$&"
 If &$address_data$& is set when the routers are called from an ACL to verify a
 sender address, the final value is preserved in &$sender_address_data$&, to
 distinguish it from data from a recipient address. The value does not persist
@@ -11085,15 +11253,15 @@ after the end of the current ACL statement. If you want to preserve it for
 longer, you can save it in an ACL variable.
 
 .vitem &$sender_address_domain$&
-.cindex "&$sender_address_domain$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_address_domain$&"
 The domain portion of &$sender_address$&.
 
 .vitem &$sender_address_local_part$&
-.cindex "&$sender_address_local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_address_local_part$&"
 The local part portion of &$sender_address$&.
 
 .vitem &$sender_data$&
-.cindex "&$sender_data$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_data$&"
 This variable is set after a lookup success in an ACL &%senders%& condition or
 in a router &%senders%& option. It contains the data from the lookup, and the
 value remains set until the next &%senders%& test. Thus, you can do things like
@@ -11108,7 +11276,7 @@ The variable is not set for a lookup that is used as part of the string
 expansion that all such lists undergo before being interpreted.
 
 .vitem &$sender_fullhost$&
-.cindex "&$sender_fullhost$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_fullhost$&"
 When a message is received from a remote host, this variable contains the host
 name and IP address in a single string. It ends with the IP address in square
 brackets, followed by a colon and a port number if the logging of ports is
@@ -11122,31 +11290,31 @@ the argument of a HELO or EHLO command. This is omitted if it is identical to
 the verified host name or to the host's IP address in square brackets.
 
 .vitem &$sender_helo_name$&
-.cindex "&$sender_helo_name$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_helo_name$&"
 When a message is received from a remote host that has issued a HELO or EHLO
 command, the argument of that command is placed in this variable. It is also
 set if HELO or EHLO is used when a message is received using SMTP locally via
 the &%-bs%& or &%-bS%& options.
 
 .vitem &$sender_host_address$&
-.cindex "&$sender_host_address$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_host_address$&"
 When a message is received from a remote host, this variable contains that
 host's IP address. For locally submitted messages, it is empty.
 
 .vitem &$sender_host_authenticated$&
-.cindex "&$sender_host_authenticated$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_host_authenticated$&"
 This variable contains the name (not the public name) of the authenticator
 driver that successfully authenticated the client from which the message was
 received. It is empty if there was no successful authentication. See also
 &$authenticated_id$&.
 
 .vitem &$sender_host_name$&
-.cindex "&$sender_host_name$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_host_name$&"
 When a message is received from a remote host, this variable contains the
 host's name as obtained by looking up its IP address. For messages received by
 other means, this variable is empty.
 
-.cindex "&$host_lookup_failed$&"
+.vindex "&$host_lookup_failed$&"
 If the host name has not previously been looked up, a reference to
 &$sender_host_name$& triggers a lookup (for messages from remote hosts).
 A looked up name is accepted only if it leads back to the original IP address
@@ -11154,7 +11322,7 @@ via a forward lookup. If either the reverse or the forward lookup fails to find
 any data, or if the forward lookup does not yield the original IP address,
 &$sender_host_name$& remains empty, and &$host_lookup_failed$& is set to &"1"&.
 
-.cindex "&$host_lookup_deferred$&"
+.vindex "&$host_lookup_deferred$&"
 However, if either of the lookups cannot be completed (for example, there is a
 DNS timeout), &$host_lookup_deferred$& is set to &"1"&, and
 &$host_lookup_failed$& remains set to &"0"&.
@@ -11197,12 +11365,12 @@ IP address in an EHLO or HELO command.
 
 
 .vitem &$sender_host_port$&
-.cindex "&$sender_host_port$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_host_port$&"
 When a message is received from a remote host, this variable contains the port
 number that was used on the remote host.
 
 .vitem &$sender_ident$&
-.cindex "&$sender_ident$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_ident$&"
 When a message is received from a remote host, this variable contains the
 identification received in response to an RFC 1413 request. When a message has
 been received locally, this variable contains the login name of the user that
@@ -11216,7 +11384,7 @@ A number of variables whose names begin &$sender_rate_$& are set as part of the
 .vitem &$sender_rcvhost$&
 .cindex "DNS" "reverse lookup"
 .cindex "reverse DNS lookup"
-.cindex "&$sender_rcvhost$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_rcvhost$&"
 This is provided specifically for use in &'Received:'& headers. It starts with
 either the verified host name (as obtained from a reverse DNS lookup) or, if
 there is no verified host name, the IP address in square brackets. After that
@@ -11233,20 +11401,36 @@ all three items are present in the parentheses, a newline and tab are inserted
 into the string, to improve the formatting of the &'Received:'& header.
 
 .vitem &$sender_verify_failure$&
-.cindex "&$sender_verify_failure$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_verify_failure$&"
 In an ACL, when a sender verification fails, this variable contains information
 about the failure. The details are the same as for
 &$recipient_verify_failure$&.
 
+.new
+.vitem &$sending_ip_address$&
+.vindex "&$sending_ip_address$&"
+This variable is set whenever an outgoing SMTP connection to another host has
+been set up. It contains the IP address of the local interface that is being
+used. This is useful if a host that has more than one IP address wants to take
+on different personalities depending on which one is being used. For incoming
+connections, see &$received_ip_address$&.
+
+.vitem &$sending_port$&
+.vindex "&$sending_port$&"
+This variable is set whenever an outgoing SMTP connection to another host has
+been set up. It contains the local port that is being used. For incoming
+connections, see &$received_port$&.
+.wen
+
 .vitem &$smtp_active_hostname$&
-.cindex "&$smtp_active_hostname$&"
+.vindex "&$smtp_active_hostname$&"
 During an incoming SMTP session, this variable contains the value of the active
 host name, as specified by the &%smtp_active_hostname%& option. The value of
 &$smtp_active_hostname$& is saved with any message that is received, so its
 value can be consulted during routing and delivery.
 
 .vitem &$smtp_command$&
-.cindex "&$smtp_command$&"
+.vindex "&$smtp_command$&"
 During the processing of an incoming SMTP command, this variable contains the
 entire command. This makes it possible to distinguish between HELO and EHLO in
 the HELO ACL, and also to distinguish between commands such as these:
@@ -11260,13 +11444,27 @@ rewriting, whereas the values in &$local_part$& and &$domain$& are taken from
 the address after SMTP-time rewriting.
 
 .vitem &$smtp_command_argument$&
-.cindex "SMTP command" "argument for"
-.cindex "&$smtp_command_argument$&"
+.cindex "SMTP" "command, argument for"
+.vindex "&$smtp_command_argument$&"
 While an ACL is running to check an SMTP command, this variable contains the
 argument, that is, the text that follows the command name, with leading white
 space removed. Following the introduction of &$smtp_command$&, this variable is
 somewhat redundant, but is retained for backwards compatibility.
 
+.new
+.vitem &$smtp_count_at_connection_start$&
+.vindex "&$smtp_count_at_connection_start$&"
+This variable is set greater than zero only in processes spawned by the Exim
+daemon for handling incoming SMTP connections. The name is deliberately long,
+in order to emphasize what the contents are. When the daemon accepts a new
+connection, it increments this variable. A copy of the variable is passed to
+the child process that handles the connection, but its value is fixed, and
+never changes. It is only an approximation of how many incoming connections
+there actually are, because many other connections may come and go while a
+single connection is being processed. When a child process terminates, the
+daemon decrements its copy of the variable.
+.wen
+
 .vitem "&$sn0$& &-- &$sn9$&"
 These variables are copies of the values of the &$n0$& &-- &$n9$& accumulators
 that were current at the end of the system filter file. This allows a system
@@ -11281,18 +11479,18 @@ is compiled with the content-scanning extension. For details, see section
 
 
 .vitem &$spool_directory$&
-.cindex "&$spool_directory$&"
+.vindex "&$spool_directory$&"
 The name of Exim's spool directory.
 
 .vitem &$spool_inodes$&
-.cindex "&$spool_inodes$&"
+.vindex "&$spool_inodes$&"
 The number of free inodes in the disk partition where Exim's spool files are
 being written. The value is recalculated whenever the variable is referenced.
 If the relevant file system does not have the concept of inodes, the value of
 is -1. See also the &%check_spool_inodes%& option.
 
 .vitem &$spool_space$&
-.cindex "&$spool_space$&"
+.vindex "&$spool_space$&"
 The amount of free space (as a number of kilobytes) in the disk partition where
 Exim's spool files are being written. The value is recalculated whenever the
 variable is referenced. If the operating system does not have the ability to
@@ -11306,19 +11504,19 @@ See also the &%check_spool_space%& option.
 
 
 .vitem &$thisaddress$&
-.cindex "&$thisaddress$&"
+.vindex "&$thisaddress$&"
 This variable is set only during the processing of the &%foranyaddress%&
 command in a filter file. Its use is explained in the description of that
 command, which can be found in the separate document entitled &'Exim's
 interfaces to mail filtering'&.
 
 .vitem &$tls_certificate_verified$&
-.cindex "&$tls_certificate_verified$&"
+.vindex "&$tls_certificate_verified$&"
 This variable is set to &"1"& if a TLS certificate was verified when the
 message was received, and &"0"& otherwise.
 
 .vitem &$tls_cipher$&
-.cindex "&$tls_cipher$&"
+.vindex "&$tls_cipher$&"
 When a message is received from a remote host over an encrypted SMTP
 connection, this variable is set to the cipher suite that was negotiated, for
 example DES-CBC3-SHA. In other circumstances, in particular, for message
@@ -11326,65 +11524,66 @@ received over unencrypted connections, the variable is empty. See chapter
 &<<CHAPTLS>>& for details of TLS support.
 
 .vitem &$tls_peerdn$&
-.cindex "&$tls_peerdn$&"
+.vindex "&$tls_peerdn$&"
 When a message is received from a remote host over an encrypted SMTP
 connection, and Exim is configured to request a certificate from the client,
 the value of the Distinguished Name of the certificate is made available in the
 &$tls_peerdn$& during subsequent processing.
 
 .vitem &$tod_bsdinbox$&
-.cindex "&$tod_bsdinbox$&"
+.vindex "&$tod_bsdinbox$&"
 The time of day and the date, in the format required for BSD-style mailbox
 files, for example: Thu Oct 17 17:14:09 1995.
 
 .vitem &$tod_epoch$&
-.cindex "&$tod_epoch$&"
+.vindex "&$tod_epoch$&"
 The time and date as a number of seconds since the start of the Unix epoch.
 
 .vitem &$tod_full$&
-.cindex "&$tod_full$&"
+.vindex "&$tod_full$&"
 A full version of the time and date, for example: Wed, 16 Oct 1995 09:51:40
 +0100. The timezone is always given as a numerical offset from UTC, with
 positive values used for timezones that are ahead (east) of UTC, and negative
 values for those that are behind (west).
 
 .vitem &$tod_log$&
-.cindex "&$tod_log$&"
+.vindex "&$tod_log$&"
 The time and date in the format used for writing Exim's log files, for example:
 1995-10-12 15:32:29, but without a timezone.
 
 .vitem &$tod_logfile$&
-.cindex "&$tod_logfile$&"
+.vindex "&$tod_logfile$&"
 This variable contains the date in the format yyyymmdd. This is the format that
 is used for datestamping log files when &%log_file_path%& contains the &`%D`&
 flag.
 
 .vitem &$tod_zone$&
-.cindex "&$tod_zone$&"
+.vindex "&$tod_zone$&"
 This variable contains the numerical value of the local timezone, for example:
 -0500.
 
 .vitem &$tod_zulu$&
-.cindex "&$tod_zulu$&"
+.vindex "&$tod_zulu$&"
 This variable contains the UTC date and time in &"Zulu"& format, as specified
 by ISO 8601, for example: 20030221154023Z.
 
 .vitem &$value$&
-.cindex "&$value$&"
+.vindex "&$value$&"
 This variable contains the result of an expansion lookup, extraction operation,
-or external command, as described above.
+or external command, as described above. &new("It is also used during a
+&*reduce*& expansion.")
 
 .vitem &$version_number$&
-.cindex "&$version_number$&"
+.vindex "&$version_number$&"
 The version number of Exim.
 
 .vitem &$warn_message_delay$&
-.cindex "&$warn_message_delay$&"
+.vindex "&$warn_message_delay$&"
 This variable is set only during the creation of a message warning about a
 delivery delay. Details of its use are explained in section &<<SECTcustwarn>>&.
 
 .vitem &$warn_message_recipients$&
-.cindex "&$warn_message_recipients$&"
+.vindex "&$warn_message_recipients$&"
 This variable is set only during the creation of a message warning about a
 delivery delay. Details of its use are explained in section &<<SECTcustwarn>>&.
 .endlist
@@ -11408,7 +11607,7 @@ EXIM_PERL = perl.o
 in your &_Local/Makefile_& and then build Exim in the normal way.
 
 
-.section "Setting up so Perl can be used"
+.section "Setting up so Perl can be used" "SECID85"
 .cindex "&%perl_startup%&"
 Access to Perl subroutines is via a global configuration option called
 &%perl_startup%& and an expansion string operator &%${perl ...}%&. If there is
@@ -11447,7 +11646,7 @@ There is also a command line option &%-pd%& (for delay) which suppresses the
 initial startup, even if &%perl_at_start%& is set.
 
 
-.section "Calling Perl subroutines"
+.section "Calling Perl subroutines" "SECID86"
 When the configuration file includes a &%perl_startup%& option you can make use
 of the string expansion item to call the Perl subroutines that are defined
 by the &%perl_startup%& code. The operator is used in any of the following
@@ -11471,7 +11670,7 @@ by obeying Perl's &%die%& function, the expansion fails with the error message
 that was passed to &%die%&.
 
 
-.section "Calling Exim functions from Perl"
+.section "Calling Exim functions from Perl" "SECID87"
 Within any Perl code called from Exim, the function &'Exim::expand_string()'&
 is available to call back into Exim's string expansion function. For example,
 the Perl code
@@ -11496,7 +11695,7 @@ debugging is enabled. If you want a newline at the end, you must supply it.
 timestamp. In this case, you should not supply a terminating newline.
 
 
-.section "Use of standard output and error by Perl"
+.section "Use of standard output and error by Perl" "SECID88"
 .cindex "Perl" "standard output and error"
 You should not write to the standard error or output streams from within your
 Perl code, as it is not defined how these are set up. In versions of Exim
@@ -11574,14 +11773,12 @@ interfaces, or on different ports, and for this reason there are a number of
 options that can be used to influence Exim's behaviour. The rest of this
 chapter describes how they operate.
 
-.new
 When a message is received over TCP/IP, the interface and port that were
 actually used are set in &$received_ip_address$& and &$received_port$&.
-.wen
 
 
 
-.section "Starting a listening daemon"
+.section "Starting a listening daemon" "SECID89"
 When a listening daemon is started (by means of the &%-bd%& command line
 option), the interfaces and ports on which it listens are controlled by the
 following options:
@@ -11636,7 +11833,7 @@ IP addresses in &%local_interfaces%&, only numbers (not names) can be used.
 
 
 
-.section "Special IP listening addresses"
+.section "Special IP listening addresses" "SECID90"
 The addresses 0.0.0.0 and ::0 are treated specially. They are interpreted
 as &"all IPv4 interfaces"& and &"all IPv6 interfaces"&, respectively. In each
 case, Exim tells the TCP/IP stack to &"listen on all IPv&'x'& interfaces"&
@@ -11653,7 +11850,7 @@ Thus, by default, Exim listens on all available interfaces, on the SMTP port.
 
 
 
-.section "Overriding local_interfaces and daemon_smtp_ports"
+.section "Overriding local_interfaces and daemon_smtp_ports" "SECID91"
 The &%-oX%& command line option can be used to override the values of
 &%daemon_smtp_ports%& and/or &%local_interfaces%& for a particular daemon
 instance. Another way of doing this would be to use macros and the &%-D%&
@@ -11707,7 +11904,7 @@ connections via the daemon.)
 
 
 
-.section "IPv6 address scopes"
+.section "IPv6 address scopes" "SECID92"
 .cindex "IPv6" "address scopes"
 IPv6 addresses have &"scopes"&, and a host with multiple hardware interfaces
 can, in principle, have the same link-local IPv6 address on different
@@ -11733,7 +11930,7 @@ instead of &[getaddrinfo()]&. (Before version 4.14, it always used this
 function.) Of course, this means that the additional functionality of
 &[getaddrinfo()]& &-- recognizing scoped addresses &-- is lost.
 
-.section "Disabling IPv6"
+.section "Disabling IPv6" "SECID93"
 .cindex "IPv6" "disabling"
 Sometimes it happens that an Exim binary that was compiled with IPv6 support is
 run on a host whose kernel does not support IPv6. The binary will fall back to
@@ -11754,7 +11951,7 @@ IPv6 addresses in an individual router.
 
 
 
-.section "Examples of starting a listening daemon"
+.section "Examples of starting a listening daemon" "SECID94"
 The default case in an IPv6 environment is
 .code
 daemon_smtp_ports = smtp
@@ -11787,7 +11984,7 @@ local_interfaces = 192.168.34.67 : 192.168.34.67
 
 
 
-.section "Recognising the local host" "SECTreclocipadd"
+.section "Recognizing the local host" "SECTreclocipadd"
 The &%local_interfaces%& option is also used when Exim needs to determine
 whether or not an IP address refers to the local host. That is, the IP
 addresses of all the interfaces on which a daemon is listening are always
@@ -11827,7 +12024,7 @@ addresses match &%local_interfaces%& or &%extra_local_interfaces%&.
 
 
 
-.section "Delivering to a remote host"
+.section "Delivering to a remote host" "SECID95"
 Delivery to a remote host is handled by the smtp transport. By default, it
 allows the system's TCP/IP functions to choose which interface to use (if
 there is more than one) when connecting to a remote host. However, the
@@ -11868,7 +12065,7 @@ are now so many options, they are first listed briefly in functional groups, as
 an aid to finding the name of the option you are looking for. Some options are
 listed in more than one group.
 
-.section "Miscellaneous"
+.section "Miscellaneous" "SECID96"
 .table2
 .row &%bi_command%&                  "to run for &%-bi%& command line option"
 .row &%disable_ipv6%&                "do no IPv6 processing"
@@ -11881,7 +12078,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 .endtable
 
 
-.section "Exim parameters"
+.section "Exim parameters" "SECID97"
 .table2
 .row &%exim_group%&                  "override compiled-in value"
 .row &%exim_path%&                   "override compiled-in value"
@@ -11893,7 +12090,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Privilege controls"
+.section "Privilege controls" "SECID98"
 .table2
 .row &%admin_groups%&                "groups that are Exim admin users"
 .row &%deliver_drop_privilege%&      "drop root for delivery processes"
@@ -11910,7 +12107,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Logging"
+.section "Logging" "SECID99"
 .table2
 .row &%hosts_connection_nolog%&      "exemption from connect logging"
 .row &%log_file_path%&               "override compiled-in value"
@@ -11928,7 +12125,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Frozen messages"
+.section "Frozen messages" "SECID100"
 .table2
 .row &%auto_thaw%&                   "sets time for retrying frozen messages"
 .row &%freeze_tell%&                 "send message when freezing"
@@ -11938,7 +12135,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Data lookups"
+.section "Data lookups" "SECID101"
 .table2
 .row &%ldap_default_servers%&        "used if no server in query"
 .row &%ldap_version%&                "set protocol version"
@@ -11951,7 +12148,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Message ids"
+.section "Message ids" "SECID102"
 .table2
 .row &%message_id_header_domain%&    "used to build &'Message-ID:'& header"
 .row &%message_id_header_text%&      "ditto"
@@ -11959,7 +12156,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Embedded Perl Startup"
+.section "Embedded Perl Startup" "SECID103"
 .table2
 .row &%perl_at_start%&               "always start the interpreter"
 .row &%perl_startup%&                "code to obey when starting Perl"
@@ -11967,7 +12164,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Daemon"
+.section "Daemon" "SECID104"
 .table2
 .row &%daemon_smtp_ports%&           "default ports"
 .row &%daemon_startup_retries%&      "number of times to retry"
@@ -11980,7 +12177,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Resource control"
+.section "Resource control" "SECID105"
 .table2
 .row &%check_log_inodes%&            "before accepting a message"
 .row &%check_log_space%&             "before accepting a message"
@@ -12007,7 +12204,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Policy controls"
+.section "Policy controls" "SECID106"
 .table2
 .row &%acl_not_smtp%&                "ACL for non-SMTP messages"
 .row &%acl_not_smtp_mime%&           "ACL for non-SMTP MIME parts"
@@ -12051,7 +12248,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Callout cache"
+.section "Callout cache" "SECID107"
 .table2
 .row &%callout_domain_negative_expire%& "timeout for negative domain cache &&&
                                          item"
@@ -12064,8 +12261,11 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "TLS"
+.section "TLS" "SECID108"
 .table2
+.row &new(&%gnutls_require_kx%&)           "control GnuTLS key exchanges"
+.row &new(&%gnutls_require_mac%&)          "control GnuTLS MAC algorithms"
+.row &new(&%gnutls_require_protocols%&)    "control GnuTLS protocols"
 .row &%tls_advertise_hosts%&         "advertise TLS to these hosts"
 .row &%tls_certificate%&             "location of server certificate"
 .row &%tls_crl%&                     "certificate revocation list"
@@ -12073,7 +12273,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 .row &%tls_on_connect_ports%&        "specify SSMTP (SMTPS) ports"
 .row &%tls_privatekey%&              "location of server private key"
 .row &%tls_remember_esmtp%&          "don't reset after starting TLS"
-.row &%tls_require_ciphers%&         "specify acceptable cipers"
+.row &%tls_require_ciphers%&         "specify acceptable ciphers"
 .row &%tls_try_verify_hosts%&        "try to verify client certificate"
 .row &%tls_verify_certificates%&     "expected client certificates"
 .row &%tls_verify_hosts%&            "insist on client certificate verify"
@@ -12081,7 +12281,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Local user handling"
+.section "Local user handling" "SECID109"
 .table2
 .row &%finduser_retries%&            "useful in NIS environments"
 .row &%gecos_name%&                  "used when creating &'Sender:'&"
@@ -12095,7 +12295,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "All incoming messages (SMTP and non-SMTP)"
+.section "All incoming messages (SMTP and non-SMTP)" "SECID110"
 .table2
 .row &%header_maxsize%&              "total size of message header"
 .row &%header_line_maxsize%&         "individual header line limit"
@@ -12104,13 +12304,13 @@ listed in more than one group.
 .row &%received_header_text%&        "expanded to make &'Received:'&"
 .row &%received_headers_max%&        "for mail loop detection"
 .row &%recipients_max%&              "limit per message"
-.row &%recipients_max_reject%&       "permanently reject excess"
+.row &%recipients_max_reject%&       "permanently reject excess recipients"
 .endtable
 
 
 
 
-.section "Non-SMTP incoming messages"
+.section "Non-SMTP incoming messages" "SECID111"
 .table2
 .row &%receive_timeout%&             "for non-SMTP messages"
 .endtable
@@ -12119,7 +12319,7 @@ listed in more than one group.
 
 
 
-.section "Incoming SMTP messages"
+.section "Incoming SMTP messages" "SECID112"
 See also the &'Policy controls'& section above.
 
 .table2
@@ -12158,7 +12358,7 @@ See also the &'Policy controls'& section above.
 
 
 
-.section "SMTP extensions"
+.section "SMTP extensions" "SECID113"
 .table2
 .row &%accept_8bitmime%&             "advertise 8BITMIME"
 .row &%auth_advertise_hosts%&        "advertise AUTH to these hosts"
@@ -12170,7 +12370,7 @@ See also the &'Policy controls'& section above.
 
 
 
-.section "Processing messages"
+.section "Processing messages" "SECID114"
 .table2
 .row &%allow_domain_literals%&       "recognize domain literal syntax"
 .row &%allow_mx_to_ip%&              "allow MX to point to IP address"
@@ -12191,7 +12391,7 @@ See also the &'Policy controls'& section above.
 
 
 
-.section "System filter"
+.section "System filter" "SECID115"
 .table2
 .row &%system_filter%&               "locate system filter"
 .row &%system_filter_directory_transport%& "transport for delivery to a &&&
@@ -12205,7 +12405,7 @@ See also the &'Policy controls'& section above.
 
 
 
-.section "Routing and delivery"
+.section "Routing and delivery" "SECID116"
 .table2
 .row &%disable_ipv6%&                "do no IPv6 processing"
 .row &%dns_again_means_nonexist%&    "for broken domains"
@@ -12231,7 +12431,7 @@ See also the &'Policy controls'& section above.
 
 
 
-.section "Bounce and warning messages"
+.section "Bounce and warning messages" "SECID117"
 .table2
 .row &%bounce_message_file%&         "content of bounce"
 .row &%bounce_message_text%&         "content of bounce"
@@ -12239,6 +12439,7 @@ See also the &'Policy controls'& section above.
 .row &%bounce_return_message%&       "include original message in bounce"
 .row &%bounce_return_size_limit%&    "limit on returned message"
 .row &%bounce_sender_authentication%& "send authenticated sender with bounce"
+.row &new(&%dsn_from%&)                    "set &'From:'& contents in bounces"
 .row &%errors_copy%&                 "copy bounce messages"
 .row &%errors_reply_to%&             "&'Reply-to:'& in bounces"
 .row &%delay_warning%&               "time schedule"
@@ -12296,7 +12497,7 @@ See chapter &<<CHAPACL>>& for further details.
 .cindex "DATA" "ACL for"
 This option defines the ACL that is run after an SMTP DATA command has been
 processed and the message itself has been received, but before the final
-acknowledgement is sent. See chapter &<<CHAPACL>>& for further details.
+acknowledgment is sent. See chapter &<<CHAPACL>>& for further details.
 
 .option acl_smtp_etrn main string&!! unset
 .cindex "ETRN" "ACL for"
@@ -12338,7 +12539,7 @@ received, before the message itself is received. See chapter &<<CHAPACL>>& for
 further details.
 
 .option acl_smtp_quit main string&!! unset
-.cindex "QUIT" "ACL for"
+.cindex "QUITACL for"
 This option defines the ACL that is run when an SMTP QUIT command is
 received. See chapter &<<CHAPACL>>& for further details.
 
@@ -12348,7 +12549,7 @@ This option defines the ACL that is run when an SMTP RCPT command is
 received. See chapter &<<CHAPACL>>& for further details.
 
 .option acl_smtp_starttls main string&!! unset
-.cindex "STARTTLS" "ACL for"
+.cindex "STARTTLSACL for"
 This option defines the ACL that is run when an SMTP STARTTLS command is
 received. See chapter &<<CHAPACL>>& for further details.
 
@@ -12444,7 +12645,7 @@ option is expanded, with a setting like this:
 .code
 auth_advertise_hosts = ${if eq{$tls_cipher}{}{}{*}}
 .endd
-.cindex "&$tls_cipher$&"
+.vindex "&$tls_cipher$&"
 If &$tls_cipher$& is empty, the session is not encrypted, and the result of
 the expansion is empty, thus matching no hosts. Otherwise, the result of the
 expansion is *, which matches all hosts.
@@ -12475,7 +12676,7 @@ before use. See section &<<SECTscanvirus>>& for further details.
 
 
 .option bi_command main string unset
-.cindex "&%-bi%& option"
+.oindex "&%-bi%&"
 This option supplies the name of a command that is run when Exim is called with
 the &%-bi%& option (see chapter &<<CHAPcommandline>>&). The string value is
 just the command name, it is not a complete command line. If an argument is
@@ -12513,7 +12714,7 @@ bounce messages generated by Exim. See also &%bounce_return_size_limit%& and
 
 
 .option bounce_return_size_limit main integer 100K
-.cindex "size limit" "of bounce"
+.cindex "size" "of bounce, limit"
 .cindex "bounce message" "size limit"
 .cindex "limit" "bounce message size"
 This option sets a limit in bytes on the size of messages that are returned to
@@ -12590,7 +12791,7 @@ See &%check_spool_space%& below.
 
 .oindex "&%check_rfc2047_length%&"
 .cindex "RFC 2047" "disabling length check"
-.option check_rfc2047_length " User: main" boolean true
+.option check_rfc2047_length main boolean true
 RFC 2047 defines a way of encoding non-ASCII characters in headers using a
 system of &"encoded words"&. The RFC specifies a maximum length for an encoded
 word; strings to be encoded that exceed this length are supposed to use
@@ -12606,15 +12807,15 @@ See &%check_spool_space%& below.
 
 .option check_spool_space main integer 0
 .cindex "checking disk space"
-.cindex "disk space" "checking"
+.cindex "disk spacechecking"
 .cindex "spool directory" "checking space"
 The four &%check_...%& options allow for checking of disk resources before a
 message is accepted.
 
-.cindex "&$log_inodes$&"
-.cindex "&$log_space$&"
-.cindex "&$spool_inodes$&"
-.cindex "&$spool_space$&"
+.vindex "&$log_inodes$&"
+.vindex "&$log_space$&"
+.vindex "&$spool_inodes$&"
+.vindex "&$spool_space$&"
 When any of these options are set, they apply to all incoming messages. If you
 want to apply different checks to different kinds of message, you can do so by
 testing the variables &$log_inodes$&, &$log_space$&, &$spool_inodes$&, and
@@ -12657,7 +12858,7 @@ listens. See chapter &<<CHAPinterfaces>>& for details of how it is used. For
 backward compatibility, &%daemon_smtp_port%& (singular) is a synonym.
 
 .option daemon_startup_retries main integer 9
-.cindex "daemon startup" "retrying"
+.cindex "daemon startupretrying"
 This option, along with &%daemon_startup_sleep%&, controls the retrying done by
 the daemon at startup when it cannot immediately bind a listening socket
 (typically because the socket is already in use): &%daemon_startup_retries%&
@@ -12669,7 +12870,7 @@ See &%daemon_startup_retries%&.
 
 .option delay_warning main "time list" 24h
 .cindex "warning of delay"
-.cindex "delay warning" "specifying"
+.cindex "delay warningspecifying"
 When a message is delayed, Exim sends a warning message to the sender at
 intervals specified by this option. The data is a colon-separated list of times
 after which to send warning messages. If the value of the option is an empty
@@ -12694,7 +12895,7 @@ delay_warning = 2h:12h:99d
 .endd
 
 .option delay_warning_condition main string&!! "see below"
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
 The string is expanded at the time a warning message might be sent. If all the
 deferred addresses have the same domain, it is set in &$domain$& during the
 expansion. Otherwise &$domain$& is empty. If the result of the expansion is a
@@ -12740,6 +12941,22 @@ should not be present in incoming messages, and this option causes them to be
 removed at the time the message is received, to avoid any problems that might
 occur when a delivered message is subsequently sent on to some other recipient.
 
+.new
+.option disable_fnync main boolean false
+.cindex "&[fsync()]&, disabling"
+This option is available only if Exim was built with the compile-time option
+ENABLE_DISABLE_FSYNC. When this is not set, a reference to &%disable_fsync%& in
+a runtime configuration generates an &"unknown option"& error. You should not
+build Exim with ENABLE_DISABLE_FSYNC or set &%disable_fsync%& unless you
+really, really, really understand what you are doing. &'No pre-compiled
+distributions of Exim should ever make this option available.'&
+
+When &%disable_fsync%& is set true, Exim no longer calls &[fsync()]& to force
+updated files' data to be written to disc before continuing. Unexpected events
+such as crashes and power outages may cause data to be lost or scrambled.
+Here be Dragons. &*Beware.*&
+.wen
+
 
 .option disable_ipv6 main boolean false
 .cindex "IPv6" "disabling"
@@ -12834,6 +13051,19 @@ This is an obsolete option that is now a no-op. It used to affect the way Exim
 handled CR and LF characters in incoming messages. What happens now is
 described in section &<<SECTlineendings>>&.
 
+.new
+.option dsn_from main "string&!!" "see below"
+.cindex "&'From:'& header line" "in bounces"
+.cindex "bounce messages" "&'From:'& line, specifying"
+This option can be used to vary the contents of &'From:'& header lines in
+bounces and other automatically generated messages (&"Delivery Status
+Notifications"& &-- hence the name of the option). The default setting is:
+.code
+dsn_from = Mail Delivery System <Mailer-Daemon@$qualify_domain>
+.endd
+The value is expanded every time it is needed. If the expansion fails, a
+panic is logged, and the default value is used.
+.wen
 
 .option envelope_to_remove main boolean true
 .cindex "&'Envelope-to:'& header line"
@@ -12866,8 +13096,8 @@ errors_copy = spqr@mydomain   postmaster@mydomain.example :\
               rqps@mydomain   hostmaster@mydomain.example,\
                               postmaster@mydomain.example
 .endd
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 The address list is expanded before use. The expansion variables &$local_part$&
 and &$domain$& are set from the original recipient of the error message, and if
 there was any wildcard matching in the pattern, the expansion
@@ -12912,7 +13142,7 @@ security issues.
 
 
 .option exim_path main string "see below"
-.cindex "Exim binary" "path name"
+.cindex "Exim binarypath name"
 This option specifies the path name of the Exim binary, which is used when Exim
 needs to re-exec itself. The default is set up to point to the file &'exim'& in
 the directory configured at compile time by the BIN_DIRECTORY setting. It
@@ -12944,8 +13174,10 @@ routing, but which are not used for listening by the daemon. See section
 &<<SECTreclocipadd>>& for details.
 
 
-.option "extract_addresses_remove_ &~arguments" main boolean true
-.cindex "&%-t%& option"
+. Allow this long option name to split
+
+.option "extract_addresses_remove_ &~&~arguments" main boolean true
+.oindex "&%-t%&"
 .cindex "command line" "addresses with &%-t%&"
 .cindex "Sendmail compatibility" "&%-t%& option"
 According to some Sendmail documentation (Sun, IRIX, HP-UX), if any addresses
@@ -12960,7 +13192,7 @@ addresses.
 
 
 .option finduser_retries main integer 0
-.cindex "NIS" "looking up users; retrying"
+.cindex "NIS, retrying user lookups"
 On systems running NIS or other schemes in which user and group information is
 distributed from a remote system, there can be times when &[getpwnam()]& and
 related functions fail, even when given valid data, because things time out.
@@ -12995,7 +13227,7 @@ logging that you require.
 
 .option gecos_name main string&!! unset
 .cindex "HP-UX"
-.cindex "&""gecos""& field" "parsing"
+.cindex "&""gecos""& fieldparsing"
 Some operating systems, notably HP-UX, use the &"gecos"& field in the system
 password file to hold other information in addition to users' real names. Exim
 looks up this field for use when it is creating &'Sender:'& or &'From:'&
@@ -13022,6 +13254,21 @@ gecos_name = $1
 See &%gecos_name%& above.
 
 
+.new
+.option gnutls_require_kx main string unset
+This option controls the key exchange mechanisms when GnuTLS is used in an Exim
+server. For details, see section &<<SECTreqciphgnu>>&.
+
+.option gnutls_require_mac main string unset
+This option controls the MAC algorithms when GnuTLS is used in an Exim
+server. For details, see section &<<SECTreqciphgnu>>&.
+
+.option gnutls_require_protocols main string unset
+This option controls the protocols when GnuTLS is used in an Exim
+server. For details, see section &<<SECTreqciphgnu>>&.
+.wen
+
+
 .option headers_charset main string "see below"
 This option sets a default character set for translating from encoded MIME
 &"words"& in header lines, when referenced by an &$h_xxx$& expansion item. The
@@ -13088,7 +13335,7 @@ do.
 
 .option helo_try_verify_hosts main "host list&!!" unset
 .cindex "HELO verifying" "optional"
-.cindex "EHLO verifying" "optional"
+.cindex "EHLO" "verifying, optional"
 By default, Exim just checks the syntax of HELO and EHLO commands (see
 &%helo_accept_junk_hosts%& and &%helo_allow_chars%&). However, some sites like
 to do more extensive checking of the data supplied by these commands. The ACL
@@ -13121,7 +13368,7 @@ be detected later in an ACL by the &`verify`& &`=`& &`helo`& condition.
 
 .option helo_verify_hosts main "host list&!!" unset
 .cindex "HELO verifying" "mandatory"
-.cindex "EHLO verifying" "mandatory"
+.cindex "EHLO" "verifying, mandatory"
 Like &%helo_try_verify_hosts%&, this option is obsolete, and retained only for
 backwards compatibility. For hosts that match this option, Exim checks the host
 name given in the HELO or EHLO in the same way as for
@@ -13153,7 +13400,7 @@ retry times, insert a dummy retry rule with a long retry time.
 
 
 .option host_lookup main "host list&!!" unset
-.cindex "host name lookup" "forcing"
+.cindex "host name" "lookup, forcing"
 Exim does not look up the name of a calling host from its IP address unless it
 is required to compare against some host list, or the host matches
 &%helo_try_verify_hosts%& or &%helo_verify_hosts%&, or the host matches this
@@ -13169,8 +13416,8 @@ After a successful reverse lookup, Exim does a forward lookup on the name it
 has obtained, to verify that it yields the IP address that it started with. If
 this check fails, Exim behaves as if the name lookup failed.
 
-.cindex "&$host_lookup_failed$&"
-.cindex "&$sender_host_name$&"
+.vindex "&$host_lookup_failed$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_host_name$&"
 After any kind of failure, the host name (in &$sender_host_name$&) remains
 unset, and &$host_lookup_failed$& is set to the string &"1"&. See also
 &%dns_again_means_nonexist%&, &%helo_lookup_domains%&, and &`verify`& &`=`&
@@ -13237,7 +13484,7 @@ section &<<SECTdomainlist>>&), and when checking the &%hosts%& option in the
 &(smtp)& transport for the local host (see the &%allow_localhost%& option in
 that transport). See also &%local_interfaces%&, &%extra_local_interfaces%&, and
 chapter &<<CHAPinterfaces>>&, which contains a discussion about local network
-interfaces and recognising the local host.
+interfaces and recognizing the local host.
 
 
 .option ignore_bounce_errors_after main time 10w
@@ -13297,7 +13544,7 @@ with LDAP support.
 
 
 .option ldap_version main integer unset
-.cindex "LDAP protocol version" "forcing"
+.cindex "LDAP" "protocol version, forcing"
 This option can be used to force Exim to set a specific protocol version for
 LDAP. If it option is unset, it is shown by the &%-bP%& command line option as
 -1. When this is the case, the default is 3 if LDAP_VERSION3 is defined in
@@ -13405,7 +13652,7 @@ See also the ACL modifier &`control = suppress_local_fixups`&. Section
 .option localhost_number main string&!! unset
 .cindex "host" "locally unique number for"
 .cindex "message ids" "with multiple hosts"
-.cindex "&$localhost_number$&"
+.vindex "&$localhost_number$&"
 Exim's message ids are normally unique only within the local host. If
 uniqueness among a set of hosts is required, each host must set a different
 value for the &%localhost_number%& option. The string is expanded immediately
@@ -13450,8 +13697,8 @@ logging, in section &<<SECTlogselector>>&.
 
 .option log_timezone main boolean false
 .cindex "log" "timezone for entries"
-.cindex "&$tod_log$&"
-.cindex "&$tod_zone$&"
+.vindex "&$tod_log$&"
+.vindex "&$tod_zone$&"
 By default, the timestamps on log lines are in local time without the
 timezone. This means that if your timezone changes twice a year, the timestamps
 in log lines are ambiguous for an hour when the clocks go back. One way of
@@ -13465,7 +13712,7 @@ another variable called &$tod_zone$& that contains just the timezone offset.
 
 .option lookup_open_max main integer 25
 .cindex "too many open files"
-.cindex "open files" "too many"
+.cindex "open filestoo many"
 .cindex "file" "too many open"
 .cindex "lookup" "maximum open files"
 .cindex "limit" "open files for lookups"
@@ -13481,7 +13728,7 @@ open files"& errors with NDBM, you need to reduce the value of
 
 
 .option max_username_length main integer 0
-.cindex "length" "of login name"
+.cindex "length of login name"
 .cindex "user name" "maximum length"
 .cindex "limit" "user name length"
 Some operating systems are broken in that they truncate long arguments to
@@ -13494,8 +13741,8 @@ an argument that is longer behaves as if &[getpwnam()]& failed.
 .option message_body_visible main integer 500
 .cindex "body of message" "visible size"
 .cindex "message body" "visible size"
-.cindex "&$message_body$&"
-.cindex "&$message_body_end$&"
+.vindex "&$message_body$&"
+.vindex "&$message_body_end$&"
 This option specifies how much of a message's body is to be included in the
 &$message_body$& and &$message_body_end$& expansion variables.
 
@@ -13527,7 +13774,7 @@ colons will become hyphens.
 
 
 .option message_logs main boolean true
-.cindex "message log" "disabling"
+.cindex "message logs" "disabling"
 .cindex "log" "message log; disabling"
 If this option is turned off, per-message log files are not created in the
 &_msglog_& spool sub-directory. This reduces the amount of disk I/O required by
@@ -13540,12 +13787,12 @@ which is not affected by this option.
 .option message_size_limit main string&!! 50M
 .cindex "message" "size limit"
 .cindex "limit" "message size"
-.cindex "size of message" "limit"
+.cindex "size" "of message, limit"
 This option limits the maximum size of message that Exim will process. The
 value is expanded for each incoming connection so, for example, it can be made
 to depend on the IP address of the remote host for messages arriving via
-TCP/IP. &new("After expansion, the value must be a sequence of decimal digits,
-optionally followed by K or M.")
+TCP/IP. After expansion, the value must be a sequence of decimal digits,
+optionally followed by K or M.
 
 &*Note*&: This limit cannot be made to depend on a message's sender or any
 other properties of an individual message, because it has to be advertised in
@@ -13660,7 +13907,7 @@ PostgreSQL support.
 
 .option pid_file_path main string&!! "set at compile time"
 .cindex "daemon" "pid file path"
-.cindex "pid file" "path for"
+.cindex "pid filepath for"
 This option sets the name of the file to which the Exim daemon writes its
 process id. The string is expanded, so it can contain, for example, references
 to the host name:
@@ -13675,14 +13922,14 @@ of the &%-oX%& option, unless a path is explicitly supplied by &%-oP%&.
 
 
 .option pipelining_advertise_hosts main "host list&!!" *
-.cindex "PIPELINING advertising" "suppressing"
+.cindex "PIPELINING" "suppressing advertising"
 This option can be used to suppress the advertisement of the SMTP
-PIPELINING extension to specific hosts. When PIPELINING is not
-advertised and &%smtp_enforce_sync%& is true, an Exim server enforces strict
-synchronization for each SMTP command and response.
-When PIPELINING is advertised, Exim assumes that clients will use it; &"out
-of order"& commands that are &"expected"& do not count as protocol errors (see
-&%smtp_max_synprot_errors%&).
+PIPELINING extension to specific hosts. &new("See also the &*no_pipelining*&
+control in section &<<SECTcontrols>>&.") When PIPELINING is not advertised and
+&%smtp_enforce_sync%& is true, an Exim server enforces strict synchronization
+for each SMTP command and response. When PIPELINING is advertised, Exim assumes
+that clients will use it; &"out of order"& commands that are &"expected"& do
+not count as protocol errors (see &%smtp_max_synprot_errors%&).
 
 
 .option preserve_message_logs main boolean false
@@ -13698,7 +13945,7 @@ volume of mail. Use with care!
 .cindex "name" "of local host"
 .cindex "host" "name of local"
 .cindex "local host" "name of"
-.cindex "&$primary_hostname$&"
+.vindex "&$primary_hostname$&"
 This specifies the name of the current host. It is used in the default EHLO or
 HELO command for outgoing SMTP messages (changeable via the &%helo_data%&
 option in the &(smtp)& transport), and as the default for &%qualify_domain%&.
@@ -13744,9 +13991,9 @@ different spool directories.
 
 
 .option prod_requires_admin main boolean true
-.cindex "&%-M%& option"
-.cindex "&%-R%& option"
-.cindex "&%-q%& option"
+.oindex "&%-M%&"
+.oindex "&%-R%&"
+.oindex "&%-q%&"
 The &%-M%&, &%-R%&, and &%-q%& command-line options require the caller to be an
 admin user unless &%prod_requires_admin%& is set false. See also
 &%queue_list_requires_admin%&.
@@ -13788,7 +14035,7 @@ next queue run. See also &%hold_domains%& and &%queue_smtp_domains%&.
 
 
 .option queue_list_requires_admin main boolean true
-.cindex "&%-bp%& option"
+.oindex "&%-bp%&"
 The &%-bp%& command-line option, which lists the messages that are on the
 queue, requires the caller to be an admin user unless
 &%queue_list_requires_admin%& is set false. See also &%prod_requires_admin%&.
@@ -13814,7 +14061,7 @@ and &%-odi%& command line options override &%queue_only%& unless
 This option can be set to a colon-separated list of absolute path names, each
 one optionally preceded by &"smtp"&. When Exim is receiving a message,
 it tests for the existence of each listed path using a call to &[stat()]&. For
-each path that exists, the corresponding queuing option is set.
+each path that exists, the corresponding queueing option is set.
 For paths with no prefix, &%queue_only%& is set; for paths prefixed by
 &"smtp"&, &%queue_smtp_domains%& is set to match all domains. So, for example,
 .code
@@ -14028,7 +14275,7 @@ then take place at once is &%queue_run_max%& multiplied by
 
 If it is purely remote deliveries you want to control, use
 &%queue_smtp_domains%& instead of &%queue_only%&. This has the added benefit of
-doing the SMTP routing before queuing, so that several messages for the same
+doing the SMTP routing before queueing, so that several messages for the same
 host will eventually get delivered down the same connection.
 
 
@@ -14108,7 +14355,7 @@ using TCP/IP), and the &%-bnq%& option was not set.
 This option controls the setting of the SO_KEEPALIVE option on incoming
 TCP/IP socket connections. When set, it causes the kernel to probe idle
 connections periodically, by sending packets with &"old"& sequence numbers. The
-other end of the connection should send an acknowledgement if the connection is
+other end of the connection should send an acknowledgment if the connection is
 still okay or a reset if the connection has been aborted. The reason for doing
 this is that it has the beneficial effect of freeing up certain types of
 connection that can get stuck when the remote host is disconnected without
@@ -14126,8 +14373,14 @@ that Exim will accept. It applies only to the listening daemon; there is no
 control (in Exim) when incoming SMTP is being handled by &'inetd'&. If the
 value is set to zero, no limit is applied. However, it is required to be
 non-zero if either &%smtp_accept_max_per_host%& or &%smtp_accept_queue%& is
-set. See also &%smtp_accept_reserve%&.
+set. See also &%smtp_accept_reserve%& and &%smtp_load_reserve%&.
 
+.new
+A new SMTP connection is immediately rejected if the &%smtp_accept_max%& limit
+has been reached. If not, Exim first checks &%smtp_accept_max_per_host%&. If
+that limit has not been reached for the client host, &%smtp_accept_reserve%&
+and &%smtp_load_reserve%& are then checked before accepting the connection.
+.wen
 
 
 .option smtp_accept_max_nonmail main integer 10
@@ -14141,7 +14394,7 @@ client host matches &%smtp_accept_max_nonmail_hosts%&.
 
 When a new message is expected, one occurrence of RSET is not counted. This
 allows a client to send one RSET between messages (this is not necessary,
-but some clients do it). Exim also allows one uncounted occurence of HELO
+but some clients do it). Exim also allows one uncounted occurrence of HELO
 or EHLO, and one occurrence of STARTTLS between messages. After
 starting up a TLS session, another EHLO is expected, and so it too is not
 counted. The first occurrence of AUTH in a connection, or immediately
@@ -14156,9 +14409,10 @@ changing the value, you can exclude any badly-behaved hosts that you have to
 live with.
 
 
+. Allow this long option to split
 
-.option smtp_accept_max_per_connection main integer 1000
-.cindex "SMTP incoming message count" "limiting"
+.option "smtp_accept_max_per_ &~&~connection" main integer 1000
+.cindex "SMTP" "limiting incoming message count"
 .cindex "limit" "messages per SMTP connection"
 The value of this option limits the number of MAIL commands that Exim is
 prepared to accept over a single SMTP connection, whether or not each command
@@ -14171,13 +14425,16 @@ seen).
 .option smtp_accept_max_per_host main string&!! unset
 .cindex "limit" "SMTP connections from one host"
 .cindex "host" "limiting SMTP connections from"
+.new
 This option restricts the number of simultaneous IP connections from a single
 host (strictly, from a single IP address) to the Exim daemon. The option is
 expanded, to enable different limits to be applied to different hosts by
 reference to &$sender_host_address$&. Once the limit is reached, additional
-connection attempts from the same host are rejected with error code 421. The
-default value of zero imposes no limit. If this option is set, it is required
-that &%smtp_accept_max%& be non-zero.
+connection attempts from the same host are rejected with error code 421. This
+is entirely independent of &%smtp_accept_reserve%&. The option's default value
+of zero imposes no limit. If this option is set greater than zero, it is
+required that &%smtp_accept_max%& be non-zero.
+.wen
 
 &*Warning*&: When setting this option you should not use any expansion
 constructions that take an appreciable amount of time. The expansion and test
@@ -14201,7 +14458,9 @@ no limit, and clearly any non-zero value is useful only if it is less than the
 command line options.
 
 
-.option smtp_accept_queue_per_connection main integer 10
+. Allow this long option name to split
+
+.option "smtp_accept_queue_per_ &~&~connection" main integer 10
 .cindex "queueing incoming messages"
 .cindex "message" "queueing by message count"
 This option limits the number of delivery processes that Exim starts
@@ -14223,27 +14482,28 @@ number of SMTP connections that are reserved for connections from the hosts
 that are specified in &%smtp_reserve_hosts%&. The value set in
 &%smtp_accept_max%& includes this reserve pool. The specified hosts are not
 restricted to this number of connections; the option specifies a minimum number
-of connection slots for them, not a maximum. It is a guarantee that that group
+of connection slots for them, not a maximum. It is a guarantee that this group
 of hosts can always get at least &%smtp_accept_reserve%& connections.
+&new("However, the limit specified by &%smtp_accept_max_per_host%& is still
+applied to each individual host.")
 
 For example, if &%smtp_accept_max%& is set to 50 and &%smtp_accept_reserve%& is
 set to 5, once there are 45 active connections (from any hosts), new
-connections are accepted only from hosts listed in &%smtp_reserve_hosts%&.
-See also &%smtp_accept_max_per_host%&.
+connections are accepted only from hosts listed in &%smtp_reserve_hosts%&,
+&new("provided the other criteria for acceptance are met.")
 
 
 .option smtp_active_hostname main string&!! unset
-.new
 .cindex "host" "name in SMTP responses"
 .cindex "SMTP" "host name in responses"
-.cindex "&$primary_hostname$&"
+.vindex "&$primary_hostname$&"
 This option is provided for multi-homed servers that want to masquerade as
 several different hosts. At the start of an incoming SMTP connection, its value
 is expanded and used instead of the value of &$primary_hostname$& in SMTP
 responses. For example, it is used as domain name in the response to an
 incoming HELO or EHLO command.
 
-.cindex "&$smtp_active_hostname$&"
+.vindex "&$smtp_active_hostname$&"
 The active hostname is placed in the &$smtp_active_hostname$& variable, which
 is saved with any messages that are received. It is therefore available for use
 in routers and transports when the message is later delivered.
@@ -14263,7 +14523,6 @@ Although &$smtp_active_hostname$& is primarily concerned with incoming
 messages, it is also used as the default for HELO commands in callout
 verification if there is no remote transport from which to obtain a
 &%helo_data%& value.
-.wen
 
 .option smtp_banner main string&!! "see below"
 .cindex "SMTP" "welcome banner"
@@ -14285,7 +14544,7 @@ multiline response).
 
 .option smtp_check_spool_space main boolean true
 .cindex "checking disk space"
-.cindex "disk space" "checking"
+.cindex "disk spacechecking"
 .cindex "spool directory" "checking space"
 When this option is set, if an incoming SMTP session encounters the SIZE
 option on a MAIL command, it checks that there is enough space in the
@@ -14333,7 +14592,7 @@ hosts), you can do so by an appropriate use of a &%control%& modifier in an ACL
 
 .option smtp_etrn_command main string&!! unset
 .cindex "ETRN" "command to be run"
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
 If this option is set, the given command is run whenever an SMTP ETRN
 command is received from a host that is permitted to issue such commands (see
 chapter &<<CHAPACL>>&). The string is split up into separate arguments which
@@ -14458,7 +14717,7 @@ See &%smtp_ratelimit_hosts%& above.
 
 .option smtp_receive_timeout main time 5m
 .cindex "timeout" "for SMTP input"
-.cindex "SMTP timeout" "input"
+.cindex "SMTP" "input timeout"
 This sets a timeout value for SMTP reception. It applies to all forms of SMTP
 input, including batch SMTP. If a line of input (either an SMTP command or a
 data line) is not received within this time, the SMTP connection is dropped and
@@ -14472,7 +14731,7 @@ The former means that Exim was expecting to read an SMTP command; the latter
 means that it was in the DATA phase, reading the contents of a message.
 
 
-.cindex "&%-os%& option"
+.oindex "&%-os%&"
 The value set by this option can be overridden by the
 &%-os%& command-line option. A setting of zero time disables the timeout, but
 this should never be used for SMTP over TCP/IP. (It can be useful in some cases
@@ -14487,11 +14746,11 @@ This option defines hosts for which SMTP connections are reserved; see
 
 .option smtp_return_error_details main boolean false
 .cindex "SMTP" "details policy failures"
-.cindex "policy control rejection" "returning details"
+.cindex "policy control" "rejection, returning details"
 In the default state, Exim uses bland messages such as
 &"Administrative prohibition"& when it rejects SMTP commands for policy
 reasons. Many sysadmins like this because it gives away little information
-to spammers. However, some other syadmins who are applying strict checking
+to spammers. However, some other sysadmins who are applying strict checking
 policies want to give out much fuller information about failures. Setting
 &%smtp_return_error_details%& true causes Exim to be more forthcoming. For
 example, instead of &"Administrative prohibition"&, it might give:
@@ -14514,7 +14773,7 @@ See section &<<SECTscanspamass>>& for more details.
 .option split_spool_directory main boolean false
 .cindex "multiple spool directories"
 .cindex "spool directory" "split"
-.cindex "directories" "multiple"
+.cindex "directoriesmultiple"
 If this option is set, it causes Exim to split its input directory into 62
 subdirectories, each with a single alphanumeric character as its name. The
 sixth character of the message id is used to allocate messages to
@@ -14562,21 +14821,19 @@ By using this option to override the compiled-in path, it is possible to run
 tests of Exim without using the standard spool.
 
 .option sqlite_lock_timeout main time 5s
-.cindex "sqlite" "lock timeout"
+.cindex "sqlite lookup type" "lock timeout"
 This option controls the timeout that the &(sqlite)& lookup uses when trying to
 access an SQLite database. See section &<<SECTsqlite>>& for more details.
 
-.new
 .option strict_acl_vars main boolean false
-.cindex "ACL variables" "handling unset"
+.cindex "&ACL;" "variables, handling unset"
 This option controls what happens if a syntactically valid but undefined ACL
 variable is referenced. If it is false (the default), an empty string
 is substituted; if it is true, an error is generated. See section
 &<<SECTaclvariables>>& for details of ACL variables.
-.wen
 
 .option strip_excess_angle_brackets main boolean false
-.cindex "angle brackets" "excess"
+.cindex "angle bracketsexcess"
 If this option is set, redundant pairs of angle brackets round &"route-addr"&
 items in addresses are stripped. For example, &'<<xxx@a.b.c.d>>'& is
 treated as &'<xxx@a.b.c.d>'&. If this is in the envelope and the message is
@@ -14648,7 +14905,7 @@ which transports are to be used. Details of this facility are given in chapter
 
 
 .option system_filter_directory_transport main string&!! unset
-.cindex "&$address_file$&"
+.vindex "&$address_file$&"
 This sets the name of the transport driver that is to be used when the
 &%save%& command in a system message filter specifies a path ending in &"/"&,
 implying delivery of each message into a separate file in some directory.
@@ -14669,7 +14926,7 @@ with the user. The value may be numerical or symbolic.
 
 .option system_filter_pipe_transport main string&!! unset
 .cindex "&(pipe)& transport" "for system filter"
-.cindex "&$address_pipe$&"
+.vindex "&$address_pipe$&"
 This specifies the transport driver that is to be used when a &%pipe%& command
 is used in a system filter. During the delivery, the variable &$address_pipe$&
 contains the pipe command.
@@ -14722,15 +14979,13 @@ sender, in a similar manner to cancellation by the &%-Mg%& command line option.
 If you want to timeout frozen bounce messages earlier than other kinds of
 frozen message, see &%ignore_bounce_errors_after%&.
 
-.new
 &*Note:*& the default value of zero means no timeouts; with this setting,
 frozen messages remain on the queue forever (except for any frozen bounce
 messages that are released by &%ignore_bounce_errors_after%&).
-.wen
 
 
 .option timezone main string unset
-.cindex "timezone" "setting"
+.cindex "timezonesetting"
 The value of &%timezone%& is used to set the environment variable TZ while
 running Exim (if it is different on entry). This ensures that all timestamps
 created by Exim are in the required timezone. If you want all your timestamps
@@ -14758,7 +15013,7 @@ chapter &<<CHAPTLS>>& for details of Exim's support for TLS.
 
 .option tls_certificate main string&!! unset
 .cindex "TLS" "server certificate; location of"
-.cindex "certificate for server" "location of"
+.cindex "certificate" "server, location of"
 The value of this option is expanded, and must then be the absolute path to a
 file which contains the server's certificates. The server's private key is also
 assumed to be in this file if &%tls_privatekey%& is unset. See chapter
@@ -14868,8 +15123,8 @@ certificates.
 
 
 .option trusted_groups main "string list&!!" unset
-.cindex "trusted group"
-.cindex "group" "trusted"
+.cindex "trusted groups"
+.cindex "groups" "trusted"
 This option is expanded just once, at the start of Exim's processing. If this
 option is set, any process that is running in one of the listed groups, or
 which has one of them as a supplementary group, is trusted. The groups can be
@@ -14879,7 +15134,7 @@ details of what trusted callers are permitted to do. If neither
 are trusted.
 
 .option trusted_users main "string list&!!" unset
-.cindex "trusted user"
+.cindex "trusted users"
 .cindex "user" "trusted"
 This option is expanded just once, at the start of Exim's processing. If this
 option is set, any process that is running as one of the listed users is
@@ -14890,7 +15145,7 @@ Exim user are trusted.
 
 .option unknown_login main string&!! unset
 .cindex "uid (user id)" "unknown caller"
-.cindex "&$caller_uid$&"
+.vindex "&$caller_uid$&"
 This is a specialized feature for use in unusual configurations. By default, if
 the uid of the caller of Exim cannot be looked up using &[getpwuid()]&, Exim
 gives up. The &%unknown_login%& option can be used to set a login name to be
@@ -14903,9 +15158,9 @@ is used for the user's real name (gecos field), unless this has been set by the
 See &%unknown_login%&.
 
 .option untrusted_set_sender main "address list&!!" unset
-.cindex "trusted user"
+.cindex "trusted users"
 .cindex "sender" "setting by untrusted user"
-.cindex "untrusted user" "setting sender"
+.cindex "untrusted user setting sender"
 .cindex "user" "untrusted setting sender"
 .cindex "envelope sender"
 When an untrusted user submits a message to Exim using the standard input, Exim
@@ -14919,7 +15174,7 @@ to declare that a message should never generate any bounces. For example:
 .code
 exim -f '<>' user@domain.example
 .endd
-.cindex "&$sender_ident$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_ident$&"
 The &%untrusted_set_sender%& option allows you to permit untrusted users to set
 other envelope sender addresses in a controlled way. When it is set, untrusted
 users are allowed to set envelope sender addresses that match any of the
@@ -15027,7 +15282,7 @@ router declines, the value of &%address_data%& remains unchanged, and the
 &%more%& option controls what happens next. Other expansion failures cause
 delivery of the address to be deferred.
 
-.cindex "&$address_data$&"
+.vindex "&$address_data$&"
 When the expansion succeeds, the value is retained with the address, and can be
 accessed using the variable &$address_data$& in the current router, subsequent
 routers, and the eventual transport.
@@ -15060,8 +15315,8 @@ lookups (though Exim does cache lookups).
 The &%address_data%& facility is also useful as a means of passing information
 from one router to another, and from a router to a transport. In addition, if
 
-.cindex "&$sender_address_data$&"
-.cindex "&$address_data$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_address_data$&"
+.vindex "&$address_data$&"
 When &$address_data$& is set by a router when verifying a recipient address
 from an ACL, it remains available for use in the rest of the ACL statement.
 After verifying a sender, the value is transferred to &$sender_address_data$&.
@@ -15070,7 +15325,7 @@ After verifying a sender, the value is transferred to &$sender_address_data$&.
 
 
 .option address_test routers&!? boolean true
-.cindex "&%-bt%& option"
+.oindex "&%-bt%&"
 .cindex "router" "skipping when address testing"
 If this option is set false, the router is skipped when routing is being tested
 by means of the &%-bt%& command line option. This can be a convenience when
@@ -15116,9 +15371,9 @@ part lists (for example, &%local_parts%&), case-sensitive matching can be
 turned on by &"+caseful"& as a list item. See section &<<SECTcasletadd>>& for
 more details.
 
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
-.cindex "&$original_local_part$&"
-.cindex "&$parent_local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$original_local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$parent_local_part$&"
 The value of the &$local_part$& variable is forced to lower case while a
 router is running unless &%caseful_local_part%& is set. When a router assigns
 an address to a transport, the value of &$local_part$& when the transport runs
@@ -15134,10 +15389,10 @@ modifier that can be used to specify case-sensitive processing within the ACL
 
 
 .option check_local_user routers&!? boolean false
-.cindex "local user" "checking in router"
+.cindex "local userchecking in router"
 .cindex "router" "checking for local user"
 .cindex "&_/etc/passwd_&"
-.cindex "&$home$&"
+.vindex "&$home$&"
 When this option is true, Exim checks that the local part of the recipient
 address (with affixes removed if relevant) is the name of an account on the
 local system. The check is done by calling the &[getpwnam()]& function rather
@@ -15215,7 +15470,7 @@ transport option of the same name.
 
 .option domains routers&!? "domain list&!!" unset
 .cindex "router" "restricting to specific domains"
-.cindex "&$domain_data$&"
+.vindex "&$domain_data$&"
 If this option is set, the router is skipped unless the current domain matches
 the list. If the match is achieved by means of a file lookup, the data that the
 lookup returned for the domain is placed in &$domain_data$& for use in string
@@ -15265,7 +15520,7 @@ no longer gives rise to a bounce message; the error is discarded. If the
 address is delivered to a remote host, the return path is set to &`<>`&, unless
 overridden by the &%return_path%& option on the transport.
 
-.cindex "&$address_data$&"
+.vindex "&$address_data$&"
 If for some reason you want to discard local errors, but use a non-empty
 MAIL command for remote delivery, you can preserve the original return
 path in &$address_data$& in the router, and reinstate it in the transport by
@@ -15433,7 +15688,7 @@ addresses. Because, like all host lists, the value of &%ignore_target_hosts%&
 is expanded before use as a list, it is possible to make it dependent on the
 domain that is being routed.
 
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 During its expansion, &$host_address$& is set to the IP address that is being
 checked.
 
@@ -15452,7 +15707,7 @@ and &%user%& and the discussion in chapter &<<CHAPenvironment>>&.
 
 .option local_part_prefix routers&!? "string list" unset
 .cindex "router" "prefix for local part"
-.cindex "prefix" "for local part; used in router"
+.cindex "prefix" "for local part, used in router"
 If this option is set, the router is skipped unless the local part starts with
 one of the given strings, or &%local_part_prefix_optional%& is true. See
 section &<<SECTrouprecon>>& for a list of the order in which preconditions are
@@ -15468,8 +15723,8 @@ some character that does not occur in normal local parts.
 Wildcarding can be used to set up multiple user mailboxes, as described in
 section &<<SECTmulbox>>&.
 
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part_prefix$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_prefix$&"
 During the testing of the &%local_parts%& option, and while the router is
 running, the prefix is removed from the local part, and is available in the
 expansion variable &$local_part_prefix$&. When a message is being delivered, if
@@ -15536,7 +15791,7 @@ example:
 .code
 local_parts = dbm;/usr/local/specials/$domain
 .endd
-.cindex "&$local_part_data$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part_data$&"
 If the match is achieved by a lookup, the data that the lookup returned
 for the local part is placed in the variable &$local_part_data$& for use in
 expansions of the router's private options. You might use this option, for
@@ -15737,7 +15992,7 @@ independently; this setting does not become attached to them.
 .option router_home_directory routers string&!! unset
 .cindex "router" "home directory for"
 .cindex "home directory" "for router"
-.cindex "&$home$&"
+.vindex "&$home$&"
 This option sets a home directory for use while the router is running. (Compare
 &%transport_home_directory%&, which sets a home directory for later
 transporting.) In particular, if used on a &(redirect)& router, this option
@@ -15810,7 +16065,7 @@ rewritten.
 
 .vitem &%pass%&
 .cindex "&%more%& option"
-.cindex "&$self_hostname$&"
+.vindex "&$self_hostname$&"
 The router passes the address to the next router, or to the router named in the
 &%pass_router%& option if it is set. This overrides &%no_more%&. During
 subsequent routing and delivery, the variable &$self_hostname$& contains the
@@ -15868,7 +16123,7 @@ is inadequate or broken. Because this is an extremely uncommon requirement, the
 code to support this option is not included in the Exim binary unless
 SUPPORT_TRANSLATE_IP_ADDRESS=yes is set in &_Local/Makefile_&.
 
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 The &%translate_ip_address%& string is expanded for every IP address generated
 by the router, with the generated address set in &$host_address$&. If the
 expansion is forced to fail, no action is taken.
@@ -15936,7 +16191,7 @@ logged, and delivery is deferred.
 
 If the transport does not specify a home directory, and
 &%transport_home_directory%& is not set for the router, the home directory for
-the tranport is taken from the password data if &%check_local_user%& is set for
+the transport is taken from the password data if &%check_local_user%& is set for
 the router. Otherwise it is taken from &%router_home_directory%& if that option
 is set; if not, no home directory is set for the transport.
 
@@ -16005,7 +16260,7 @@ Setting this option has the effect of setting &%verify_sender%& and
 
 .option verify_only routers&!? boolean false
 .cindex "EXPN" "with &%verify_only%&"
-.cindex "&%-bv%& option"
+.oindex "&%-bv%&"
 .cindex "router" "used only when verifying"
 If this option is set, the router is used only when verifying an address or
 testing with the &%-bv%& option, not when actually doing a delivery, testing
@@ -16043,7 +16298,7 @@ are evaluated.
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
-.chapter "The accept router"
+.chapter "The accept router" "CHID4"
 .cindex "&(accept)& router"
 .cindex "routers" "&(accept)&"
 The &(accept)& router has no private options of its own. Unless it is being
@@ -16124,7 +16379,7 @@ case routing fails.
 
 
 
-.section "Private options for dnslookup"
+.section "Private options for dnslookup" "SECID118"
 .cindex "options" "&(dnslookup)& router"
 The private options for the &(dnslookup)& router are as follows:
 
@@ -16178,7 +16433,7 @@ when there is a DNS lookup error.
 .cindex "MX record" "required to exist"
 .cindex "SRV record" "required to exist"
 A domain that matches &%mx_domains%& is required to have either an MX or an SRV
-record in order to be recognised. (The name of this option could be improved.)
+record in order to be recognized. (The name of this option could be improved.)
 For example, if all the mail hosts in &'fict.example'& are known to have MX
 records, except for those in &'discworld.fict.example'&, you could use this
 setting:
@@ -16305,7 +16560,7 @@ the DNS resolver. &%widen_domains%& is not applied to sender addresses
 when verifying, unless &%rewrite_headers%& is false (not the default).
 
 
-.section "Effect of qualify_single and search_parents"
+.section "Effect of qualify_single and search_parents" "SECID119"
 When a domain from an envelope recipient is changed by the resolver as a result
 of the &%qualify_single%& or &%search_parents%& options, Exim rewrites the
 corresponding address in the message's header lines unless &%rewrite_headers%&
@@ -16333,7 +16588,7 @@ entered. No widening ever takes place for these lookups.
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
-.chapter "The ipliteral router"
+.chapter "The ipliteral router" "CHID5"
 .cindex "&(ipliteral)& router"
 .cindex "domain literal" "routing"
 .cindex "routers" "&(ipliteral)&"
@@ -16369,7 +16624,7 @@ Exim will not recognize the domain literal syntax in addresses.
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
-.chapter "The iplookup router"
+.chapter "The iplookup router" "CHID6"
 .cindex "&(iplookup)& router"
 .cindex "routers" "&(iplookup)&"
 The &(iplookup)& router was written to fulfil a specific requirement in
@@ -16415,10 +16670,14 @@ This option can be set to &"udp"& or &"tcp"& to specify which of the two
 protocols is to be used.
 
 
-.option query iplookup string&!! "&`$local_part@$domain $local_part@$domain`&"
+.option query iplookup string&!! "see below"
 This defines the content of the query that is sent to the remote hosts. The
-repetition serves as a way of checking that a response is to the correct query
-in the default case (see &%response_pattern%& below).
+default value is:
+.code
+$local_part@$domain $local_part@$domain
+.endd
+The repetition serves as a way of checking that a response is to the correct
+query in the default case (see &%response_pattern%& below).
 
 
 .option reroute iplookup string&!! unset
@@ -16456,7 +16715,7 @@ call. It does not apply to UDP.
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
-.chapter "The manualroute router"
+.chapter "The manualroute router" "CHID7"
 .scindex IIDmanrou1 "&(manualroute)& router"
 .scindex IIDmanrou2 "routers" "&(manualroute)&"
 .cindex "domain" "manually routing"
@@ -16475,7 +16734,7 @@ include a transport. The combination of a pattern and its data is called a
 generic &%transport%& option must specify a transport, unless the router is
 being used purely for verification (see &%verify_only%&).
 
-.cindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
 In the case of verification, matching the domain pattern is sufficient for the
 router to accept the address. When actually routing an address for delivery,
 an address that matches a domain pattern is queued for the associated
@@ -16497,29 +16756,39 @@ below, following the list of private options.
 .cindex "options" "&(manualroute)& router"
 The private options for the &(manualroute)& router are as follows:
 
+.new
+.option host_all_ignored manualroute string defer
+See &%host_find_failed%&.
 
 .option host_find_failed manualroute string freeze
 This option controls what happens when &(manualroute)& tries to find an IP
 address for a host, and the host does not exist. The option can be set to one
-of
+of the following values:
 .code
 decline
 defer
 fail
 freeze
+ignore
 pass
 .endd
-The default assumes that this state is a serious configuration error. The
-difference between &"pass"& and &"decline"& is that the former forces the
-address to be passed to the next router (or the router defined by
+The default (&"freeze"&) assumes that this state is a serious configuration
+error. The difference between &"pass"& and &"decline"& is that the former
+forces the address to be passed to the next router (or the router defined by
 &%pass_router%&),
 .cindex "&%more%& option"
 overriding &%no_more%&, whereas the latter passes the address to the next
 router only if &%more%& is true.
 
-This option applies only to a definite &"does not exist"& state; if a host
-lookup gets a temporary error, delivery is deferred unless the generic
-&%pass_on_timeout%& option is set.
+The value &"ignore"& causes Exim to completely ignore a host whose IP address
+cannot be found. If all the hosts in the list are ignored, the behaviour is
+controlled by the &%host_all_ignored%& option. This takes the same values
+as &%host_find_failed%&, except that it cannot be set to &"ignore"&.
+
+The &%host_find_failed%& option applies only to a definite &"does not exist"&
+state; if a host lookup gets a temporary error, delivery is deferred unless the
+generic &%pass_on_timeout%& option is set.
+.wen
 
 
 .option hosts_randomize manualroute boolean false
@@ -16586,7 +16855,7 @@ if &%headers_add%& and &%headers_remove%& are unset.
 
 
 
-.section "Routing rules in route_list"
+.section "Routing rules in route_list" "SECID120"
 The value of &%route_list%& is a string consisting of a sequence of routing
 rules, separated by semicolons. If a semicolon is needed in a rule, it can be
 entered as two semicolons. Alternatively, the list separator can be changed as
@@ -16620,7 +16889,7 @@ then used as described below. If there is no match, the router declines. When
 
 
 
-.section "Routing rules in route_data"
+.section "Routing rules in route_data" "SECID121"
 The use of &%route_list%& is convenient when there are only a small number of
 routing rules. For larger numbers, it is easier to use a file or database to
 hold the routing information, and use the &%route_data%& option instead.
@@ -16645,7 +16914,7 @@ be enclosed in quotes if it contains white space.
 
 
 
-.section "Format of the list of hosts"
+.section "Format of the list of hosts" "SECID122"
 A list of hosts, whether obtained via &%route_data%& or &%route_list%&, is
 always separately expanded before use. If the expansion fails, the router
 declines. The result of the expansion must be a colon-separated list of names
@@ -16669,7 +16938,7 @@ route_list = ^domain(\d+)   host-$1.text.example
 &$1$& is also set when partial matching is done in a file lookup.
 
 .next
-.cindex "&$value$&"
+.vindex "&$value$&"
 If the pattern that matched the domain was a lookup item, the data that was
 looked up is available in the expansion variable &$value$&. For example:
 .code
@@ -16811,13 +17080,13 @@ function called.
 If no IP address for a host can be found, what happens is controlled by the
 &%host_find_failed%& option.
 
-.cindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
 When an address is routed to a local transport, IP addresses are not looked up.
 The host list is passed to the transport in the &$host$& variable.
 
 
 
-.section "Manualroute examples"
+.section "Manualroute examples" "SECID123"
 In some of the examples that follow, the presence of the &%remote_smtp%&
 transport, as defined in the default configuration file, is assumed:
 
@@ -16919,8 +17188,8 @@ save_in_file:
       ${lookup{$domain}dbm{/domain2/hosts}{$value}fail} \
       batch_pipe
 .endd
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
-.cindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
 The first of these just passes the domain in the &$host$& variable, which
 doesn't achieve much (since it is also in &$domain$&), but the second does a
 file lookup to find a value to pass, causing the router to decline to handle
@@ -17080,7 +17349,7 @@ anything other than HOST_NOT_FOUND, that result is used. Otherwise, Exim
 goes on to try a call to &[getipnodebyname()]& or &[gethostbyname()]&, and the
 result of the lookup is the result of that call.
 
-.cindex "&$address_data$&"
+.vindex "&$address_data$&"
 If the DATA field is set, its value is placed in the &$address_data$&
 variable. For example, this return line
 .code
@@ -17118,9 +17387,11 @@ It can be routed to be delivered to a specified pipe command.
 .next
 It can cause an automatic reply to be generated.
 .next
-It can be forced to fail, with a custom error message.
+.new
+It can be forced to fail, optionally with a custom error message.
 .next
-It can be temporarily deferred.
+It can be temporarily deferred, optionally with a custom message.
+.wen
 .next
 It can be discarded.
 .endlist
@@ -17132,7 +17403,7 @@ files and pipes, and for generating autoreplies. See the &%file_transport%&,
 
 
 
-.section "Redirection data"
+.section "Redirection data" "SECID124"
 The router operates by interpreting a text string which it obtains either by
 expanding the contents of the &%data%& option, or by reading the entire
 contents of a file whose name is given in the &%file%& option. These two
@@ -17165,7 +17436,7 @@ comments.
 
 
 
-.section "Forward files and address verification"
+.section "Forward files and address verification" "SECID125"
 .cindex "address redirection" "while verifying"
 It is usual to set &%no_verify%& on &(redirect)& routers which handle users'
 &_.forward_& files, as in the example above. There are two reasons for this:
@@ -17187,7 +17458,7 @@ saves some resources.
 
 
 
-.section "Interpreting redirection data"
+.section "Interpreting redirection data" "SECID126"
 .cindex "Sieve filter" "specifying in redirection data"
 .cindex "filter" "specifying in redirection data"
 The contents of the data string, whether obtained from &%data%& or &%file%&,
@@ -17235,7 +17506,7 @@ double quotes are retained because some forms of mail address require their use
 &"item"& refers to what remains after any surrounding double quotes have been
 removed.
 
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 &*Warning*&: If you use an Exim expansion to construct a redirection address,
 and the expansion contains a reference to &$local_part$&, you should make use
 of the &%quote_local_part%& expansion operator, in case the local part contains
@@ -17249,7 +17520,7 @@ data = ${quote_local_part:$local_part}@newdomain.example
 
 .section "Redirecting to a local mailbox" "SECTredlocmai"
 .cindex "routing" "loops in"
-.cindex "loop while routing" "avoidance of"
+.cindex "loop" "while routing, avoidance of"
 .cindex "address redirection" "to local mailbox"
 A redirection item may safely be the same as the address currently under
 consideration. This does not cause a routing loop, because a router is
@@ -17270,7 +17541,7 @@ cleo, cleopatra@egypt.example
 .cindex "backslash in alias file"
 .cindex "alias file" "backslash in"
 For compatibility with other MTAs, such unqualified local parts may be
-preceeded by &"\"&, but this is not a requirement for loop prevention. However,
+preceded by &"\"&, but this is not a requirement for loop prevention. However,
 it does make a difference if more than one domain is being handled
 synonymously.
 
@@ -17385,14 +17656,11 @@ Sometimes you want to throw away mail to a particular local part. Making the
 the router to decline. Instead, the alias item
 .cindex "black hole"
 .cindex "abandoning mail"
-.code
-:blackhole:
-.endd
-can be used. It does what its name implies. No delivery is done, and no error
-message is generated. This has the same effect as specifing &_/dev/null_&, but
-can be independently disabled.
+&':blackhole:'& can be used. It does what its name implies. No delivery is
+done, and no error message is generated. This has the same effect as specifing
+&_/dev/null_& as a destination, but it can be independently disabled.
 
-&*Warning*&: If &`:blackhole:`& appears anywhere in a redirection list, no
+&*Warning*&: If &':blackhole:'& appears anywhere in a redirection list, no
 delivery is done for the original local part, even if other redirection items
 are present. If you are generating a multi-item list (for example, by reading a
 database) and need the ability to provide a no-op item, you must use
@@ -17402,7 +17670,7 @@ database) and need the ability to provide a no-op item, you must use
 .cindex "delivery" "forcing failure"
 .cindex "delivery" "forcing deferral"
 .cindex "failing delivery" "forcing"
-.cindex "deferred delivery" "forcing"
+.cindex "deferred deliveryforcing"
 .cindex "customizing" "failure message"
 An attempt to deliver a particular address can be deferred or forced to fail by
 redirection items of the form
@@ -17419,10 +17687,10 @@ X.Employee:  :fail: Gone away, no forwarding address
 .endd
 In the case of an address that is being verified from an ACL or as the subject
 of a
-.cindex "VRFY error text" "display of"
+.cindex "VRFY" "error text, display of"
 VRFY command, the text is included in the SMTP error response by
 default.
-.cindex "EXPN error text" "display of"
+.cindex "EXPN" "error text, display of"
 The text is not included in the response to an EXPN command. In non-SMTP cases
 the text is included in the error message that Exim generates.
 
@@ -17437,7 +17705,7 @@ suppress the use of the supplied code in a redirect router by setting the
 &%forbid_smtp_code%& option true. In this case, any SMTP code is quietly
 ignored.
 
-.cindex "&$acl_verify_message$&"
+.vindex "&$acl_verify_message$&"
 In an ACL, an explicitly provided message overrides the default, but the
 default message is available in the variable &$acl_verify_message$& and can
 therefore be included in a custom message if this is desired.
@@ -17460,18 +17728,15 @@ rules still apply.
 Sometimes it is useful to use a single-key search type with a default (see
 chapter &<<CHAPfdlookup>>&) to look up aliases. However, there may be a need
 for exceptions to the default. These can be handled by aliasing them to
-.code
-:unknown:
-.endd
-This differs from &':fail:'& in that it causes the &(redirect)& router to
-decline, whereas &':fail:'& forces routing to fail. A lookup which results in
-an empty redirection list has the same effect.
+&':unknown:'&. This differs from &':fail:'& in that it causes the &(redirect)&
+router to decline, whereas &':fail:'& forces routing to fail. A lookup which
+results in an empty redirection list has the same effect.
 .endlist
 
 
-.section "Duplicate addresses"
+.section "Duplicate addresses" "SECID127"
 .cindex "duplicate addresses"
-.cindex "address duplicate" "discarding"
+.cindex "address duplicatediscarding"
 .cindex "pipe" "duplicated"
 Exim removes duplicate addresses from the list to which it is delivering, so as
 to deliver just one copy to each address. This does not apply to deliveries
@@ -17495,7 +17760,7 @@ the pipes are distinct.
 
 
 
-.section "Repeated redirection expansion"
+.section "Repeated redirection expansion" "SECID128"
 .cindex "repeated redirection expansion"
 .cindex "address redirection" "repeated for each delivery attempt"
 When a message cannot be delivered to all of its recipients immediately,
@@ -17506,7 +17771,7 @@ members of the list receiving copies of old messages. The &%one_time%& option
 can be used to avoid this.
 
 
-.section "Errors in redirection lists"
+.section "Errors in redirection lists" "SECID129"
 .cindex "address redirection" "errors"
 If &%skip_syntax_errors%& is set, a malformed address that causes a parsing
 error is skipped, and an entry is written to the main log. This may be useful
@@ -17516,7 +17781,7 @@ deferred. See also &%syntax_errors_to%&.
 
 
 
-.section "Private options for the redirect router"
+.section "Private options for the redirect router" "SECID130"
 
 .cindex "options" "&(redirect)& router"
 The private options for the &(redirect)& router are as follows:
@@ -17653,7 +17918,7 @@ not, the router declines.
 
 
 .option file_transport redirect string&!! unset
-.cindex "&$address_file$&"
+.vindex "&$address_file$&"
 A &(redirect)& router sets up a direct delivery to a file when a path name not
 ending in a slash is specified as a new &"address"&. The transport used is
 specified by this option, which, after expansion, must be the name of a
@@ -17872,7 +18137,7 @@ The list is in addition to the local user's primary group when
 
 
 .option pipe_transport redirect string&!! unset
-.cindex "&$address_pipe$&"
+.vindex "&$address_pipe$&"
 A &(redirect)& router sets up a direct delivery to a pipe when a string
 starting with a vertical bar character is specified as a new &"address"&. The
 transport used is specified by this option, which, after expansion, must be the
@@ -17881,7 +18146,7 @@ When the transport is run, the pipe command is in &$address_pipe$&.
 
 
 .option qualify_domain redirect string&!! unset
-.cindex "&$qualify_recipient$&"
+.vindex "&$qualify_recipient$&"
 If this option is set, and an unqualified address (one without a domain) is
 generated, and that address would normally be qualified by the global setting
 in &%qualify_recipient%&, it is instead qualified with the domain specified by
@@ -18059,10 +18324,10 @@ configuration, and these override anything that comes from the router.
 
 
 
-.section "Concurrent deliveries"
+.section "Concurrent deliveries" "SECID131"
 .cindex "concurrent deliveries"
 .cindex "simultaneous deliveries"
-If two different messages for the same local recpient arrive more or less
+If two different messages for the same local recipient arrive more or less
 simultaneously, the two delivery processes are likely to run concurrently. When
 the &(appendfile)& transport is used to write to a file, Exim applies locking
 rules to stop concurrent processes from writing to the same file at the same
@@ -18167,7 +18432,7 @@ Of course, an error will still occur if the uid that is chosen is on the
 
 
 
-.section "Current and home directories"
+.section "Current and home directories" "SECID132"
 .cindex "current directory for local transport"
 .cindex "home directory" "for local transport"
 .cindex "transport" "local; home directory for"
@@ -18203,10 +18468,10 @@ directory to &_/_& before running a local transport.
 
 
 
-.section "Expansion variables derived from the address"
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
-.cindex "&$original_domain$&"
+.section "Expansion variables derived from the address" "SECID133"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$original_domain$&"
 Normally a local delivery is handling a single address, and in that case the
 variables such as &$domain$& and &$local_part$& are set during local
 deliveries. However, in some circumstances more than one address may be handled
@@ -18367,7 +18632,7 @@ change envelope recipients at this time.
 
 .option home_directory transports string&!! unset
 .cindex "transport" "home directory for"
-.cindex "&$home$&"
+.vindex "&$home$&"
 This option specifies a home directory setting for a local transport,
 overriding any value that may be set by the router. The home directory is
 placed in &$home$& while expanding the transport's private options. It is also
@@ -18389,7 +18654,7 @@ to ensure that any additional groups associated with the uid are set up.
 
 .option message_size_limit transports string&!! 0
 .cindex "limit" "message size per transport"
-.cindex "size of message" "limit"
+.cindex "size" "of message, limit"
 .cindex "transport" "message size; limiting"
 This option controls the size of messages passed through the transport. It is
 expanded before use; the result of the expansion must be a sequence of decimal
@@ -18405,8 +18670,8 @@ delivered.
 
 
 .option rcpt_include_affixes transports boolean false
-.cindex "prefix" "for local part; including in envelope"
-.cindex "suffix" "for local part; including in envelope"
+.cindex "prefix" "for local part, including in envelope"
+.cindex "suffix for local part" "including in envelope"
 .cindex "local part" "prefix"
 .cindex "local part" "suffix"
 When this option is false (the default), and an address that has had any
@@ -18463,7 +18728,7 @@ header line, if one is added to the message (see the next option).
 &*Note:*& A changed return path is not logged unless you add
 &%return_path_on_delivery%& to the log selector.
 
-.cindex "&$return_path$&"
+.vindex "&$return_path$&"
 The expansion can refer to the existing value via &$return_path$&. This is
 either the message's envelope sender, or an address set by the
 &%errors_to%& option on a router. If the expansion is forced to fail, no
@@ -18523,7 +18788,7 @@ ST=<shadow transport name>
 If the shadow transport did not succeed, the error message is put in
 parentheses afterwards. Shadow transports can be used for a number of different
 purposes, including keeping more detailed log information than Exim normally
-provides, and implementing automatic acknowledgement policies based on message
+provides, and implementing automatic acknowledgment policies based on message
 headers that some sites insist on.
 
 
@@ -18576,7 +18841,7 @@ more, the server might reject the message. This can be worked round by setting
 the &%size_addition%& option on the &(smtp)& transport, either to allow for
 additions to the message, or to disable the use of SIZE altogether.
 
-.cindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
+.vindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
 The value of the &%transport_filter%& option is the command string for starting
 the filter, which is run directly from Exim, not under a shell. The string is
 parsed by Exim in the same way as a command string for the &(pipe)& transport:
@@ -18587,8 +18852,8 @@ of arguments, one for each address that applies to this delivery. (This isn't
 an ideal name for this feature here, but as it was already implemented for the
 &(pipe)& transport, it seemed sensible not to change it.)
 
-.cindex "&$host$&"
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 The expansion variables &$host$& and &$host_address$& are available when the
 transport is a remote one. They contain the name and IP address of the host to
 which the message is being sent. For example:
@@ -18619,13 +18884,13 @@ Except for the special case of &$pipe_addresses$& that is mentioned above, an
 expansion cannot generate multiple arguments, or a command name followed by
 arguments. Consider this example:
 .code
-transport_filter = ${lookup{$host}lsearch{/some/file}\
+transport_filter = ${lookup{$host}lsearch{/a/file}\
                     {$value}{/bin/cat}}
 .endd
 The result of the lookup is interpreted as the name of the command, even
 if it contains white space. The simplest way round this is to use a shell:
 .code
-transport_filter = /bin/sh -c ${lookup{$host}lsearch{/some/file}\
+transport_filter = /bin/sh -c ${lookup{$host}lsearch{/a/file}\
                                {$value}{/bin/cat}}
 .endd
 .endlist
@@ -18644,7 +18909,7 @@ message, which happens if the &%return_message%& option is set.
 
 
 .option transport_filter_timeout transports time 5m
-.cindex "transport filter" "timeout"
+.cindex "transport" "filter, timeout"
 When Exim is reading the output of a transport filter, it a applies a timeout
 that can be set by this option. Exceeding the timeout is normally treated as a
 temporary delivery failure. However, if a transport filter is used with a
@@ -18656,7 +18921,7 @@ becomes a temporary error.
 
 .option user transports string&!! "Exim user"
 .cindex "uid (user id)" "local delivery"
-.cindex "transport user" "specifying"
+.cindex "transport" "user, specifying"
 This option specifies the user under whose uid the delivery process is to be
 run, overriding any uid that may have been set by the router. If the user is
 given as a name, the uid is looked up from the password data, and the
@@ -18726,11 +18991,11 @@ delivered together in a single run of the transport. Its default value is one
 to certain conditions:
 
 .ilist
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 If any of the transport's options contain a reference to &$local_part$&, no
 batching is possible.
 .next
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
 If any of the transport's options contain a reference to &$domain$&, only
 addresses with the same domain are batched.
 .next
@@ -18770,14 +19035,14 @@ transport without &%use_bsmtp%&, the only way to preserve the recipient
 addresses is to set the &%envelope_to_add%& option.
 
 .cindex "&(pipe)& transport" "with multiple addresses"
-.cindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
+.vindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
 If you are using a &(pipe)& transport without BSMTP, and setting the
 transport's &%command%& option, you can include &$pipe_addresses$& as part of
 the command. This is not a true variable; it is a bit of magic that causes each
 of the recipient addresses to be inserted into the command as a separate
 argument. This provides a way of accessing all the addresses that are being
 delivered in the batch. &*Note:*& This is not possible for pipe commands that
-are specififed by a &(redirect)& router.
+are specified by a &(redirect)& router.
 
 
 
@@ -18807,7 +19072,7 @@ SUPPORT_MAILSTORE in &_Local/Makefile_& to have the appropriate code
 included.
 
 .cindex "quota" "system"
-Exim recognises system quota errors, and generates an appropriate message. Exim
+Exim recognizes system quota errors, and generates an appropriate message. Exim
 also supports its own quota control within the transport, for use when the
 system facility is unavailable or cannot be used for some reason.
 
@@ -18834,8 +19099,8 @@ the &%directory%& option specifies a directory, in which a new file containing
 the message is created. Only one of these two options can be set, and for
 normal deliveries to mailboxes, one of them &'must'& be set.
 
-.cindex "&$address_file$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$address_file$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 However, &(appendfile)& is also used for delivering messages to files or
 directories whose names (or parts of names) are obtained from alias,
 forwarding, or filtering operations (for example, a &%save%& command in a
@@ -18903,7 +19168,7 @@ the &%file%& or &%directory%& option is still used if it is set.
 
 
 
-.section "Private options for appendfile"
+.section "Private options for appendfile" "SECID134"
 .cindex "options" "&(appendfile)& transport"
 
 
@@ -19019,14 +19284,18 @@ appended to a single mailbox file. A number of different formats are provided
 &<<SECTopdir>>& for further details of this form of delivery.
 
 
-.option directory_file appendfile string&!! &`q${base62:$tod_epoch}-$inode`&
+.option directory_file appendfile string&!! "see below"
 .cindex "base62"
-.cindex "&$inode$&"
+.vindex "&$inode$&"
 When &%directory%& is set, but neither &%maildir_format%& nor
 &%mailstore_format%& is set, &(appendfile)& delivers each message into a file
-whose name is obtained by expanding this string. The default value generates a
-unique name from the current time, in base 62 form, and the inode of the file.
-The variable &$inode$& is available only when expanding this option.
+whose name is obtained by expanding this string. The default value is:
+.code
+q${base62:$tod_epoch}-$inode
+.endd
+This generates a unique name from the current time, in base 62 form, and the
+inode of the file. The variable &$inode$& is available only when expanding this
+option.
 
 
 .option directory_mode appendfile "octal integer" 0700
@@ -19100,7 +19369,7 @@ If this option is false, the file is created if it does not exist.
 
 .option lock_fcntl_timeout appendfile time 0s
 .cindex "timeout" "mailbox locking"
-.cindex "mailbox locking" "blocking and non-blocking"
+.cindex "mailbox" "locking, blocking and non-blocking"
 .cindex "locking files"
 By default, the &(appendfile)& transport uses non-blocking calls to &[fcntl()]&
 when locking an open mailbox file. If the call fails, the delivery process
@@ -19267,7 +19536,7 @@ section &<<SECTopdir>>& below.
 .cindex "locking files"
 .cindex "file" "locking"
 .cindex "file" "MBX format"
-.cindex "MBX format" "specifying"
+.cindex "MBX formatspecifying"
 This option is available only if Exim has been compiled with SUPPORT_MBX
 set in &_Local/Makefile_&. If &%mbx_format%& is set with the &%file%& option,
 the message is appended to the mailbox file in MBX format instead of
@@ -19322,7 +19591,7 @@ message_suffix =
 If the output file is created, it is given this mode. If it already exists and
 has wider permissions, they are reduced to this mode. If it has narrower
 permissions, an error occurs unless &%mode_fail_narrower%& is false. However,
-if the delivery is the result of a &%save%& command in a filter file specifing
+if the delivery is the result of a &%save%& command in a filter file specifying
 a particular mode, the mode of the output file is always forced to take that
 value, and this option is ignored.
 
@@ -19835,14 +20104,14 @@ of the &%mailbox_size%& option as a way of importing it into Exim.
 
 
 
-.section "Using tags to record message sizes"
+.section "Using tags to record message sizes" "SECID135"
 If &%maildir_tag%& is set, the string is expanded for each delivery.
 When the maildir file is renamed into the &_new_& sub-directory, the
 tag is added to its name. However, if adding the tag takes the length of the
 name to the point where the test &[stat()]& call fails with ENAMETOOLONG,
 the tag is dropped and the maildir file is created with no tag.
 
-.cindex "&$message_size$&"
+.vindex "&$message_size$&"
 Tags can be used to encode the size of files in their names; see
 &%quota_size_regex%& above for an example. The expansion of &%maildir_tag%&
 happens after the message has been written. The value of the &$message_size$&
@@ -19855,7 +20124,7 @@ colon is inserted.
 
 
 
-.section "Using a maildirsize file"
+.section "Using a maildirsize file" "SECID136"
 .cindex "quota" "in maildir delivery"
 .cindex "maildir format" "&_maildirsize_& file"
 If &%maildir_use_size_file%& is true, Exim implements the maildir++ rules for
@@ -19881,7 +20150,7 @@ See the description of the &%maildir_quota_directory_regex%& option above for
 details.
 
 
-.section "Mailstore delivery"
+.section "Mailstore delivery" "SECID137"
 .cindex "mailstore format" "description of"
 If the &%mailstore_format%& option is true, each message is written as two
 files in the given directory. A unique base name is constructed from the
@@ -19910,7 +20179,7 @@ configuration errors, and delivery is deferred. The variable
 &$mailstore_basename$& is available for use during these expansions.
 
 
-.section "Non-special new file delivery"
+.section "Non-special new file delivery" "SECID138"
 If neither &%maildir_format%& nor &%mailstore_format%& is set, a single new
 file is created directly in the named directory. For example, when delivering
 messages into files in batched SMTP format for later delivery to some host (see
@@ -19932,7 +20201,7 @@ expanding the contents of the &%directory_file%& option.
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
-.chapter "The autoreply transport"
+.chapter "The autoreply transport" "CHID8"
 .scindex IIDauttra1 "transports" "&(autoreply)&"
 .scindex IIDauttra2 "&(autoreply)& transport"
 The &(autoreply)& transport is not a true transport in that it does not cause
@@ -19991,7 +20260,7 @@ If any of the generic options for manipulating headers (for example,
 of the original message that is included in the generated message when
 &%return_message%& is set. They do not apply to the generated message itself.
 
-.cindex "&$sender_address$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_address$&"
 If the &(autoreply)& transport receives return code 2 from Exim when it submits
 the message, indicating that there were no recipients, it does not treat this
 as an error. This means that autoreplies sent to &$sender_address$& when this
@@ -20000,7 +20269,7 @@ problems. They are just discarded.
 
 
 
-.section "Private options for autoreply"
+.section "Private options for autoreply" "SECID139"
 .cindex "options" "&(autoreply)& transport"
 
 .option bcc autoreply string&!! unset
@@ -20192,12 +20461,9 @@ delivers the message to it using the LMTP protocol.
 
 
 .option timeout lmtp time 5m
-The transport is aborted if the created process
-or Unix domain socket
-does not respond to LMTP commands or message input within this timeout.
-
-
-Here is an example of a typical LMTP transport:
+The transport is aborted if the created process or Unix domain socket does not
+respond to LMTP commands or message input within this timeout. Here is an
+example of a typical LMTP transport:
 .code
 lmtp:
   driver = lmtp
@@ -20224,13 +20490,13 @@ their incoming messages. The &(pipe)& transport can be used in one of the
 following ways:
 
 .ilist
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 A router routes one address to a transport in the normal way, and the
 transport is configured as a &(pipe)& transport. In this case, &$local_part$&
 contains the local part of the address (as usual), and the command that is run
 is specified by the &%command%& option on the transport.
 .next
-.cindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
+.vindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
 If the &%batch_max%& option is set greater than 1 (the default is 1), the
 transport can handle more than one address in a single run. In this case, when
 more than one address is routed to the transport, &$local_part$& is not set
@@ -20238,7 +20504,7 @@ more than one address is routed to the transport, &$local_part$& is not set
 (described in section &<<SECThowcommandrun>>& below) contains all the addresses
 that are routed to the transport.
 .next
-.cindex "&$address_pipe$&"
+.vindex "&$address_pipe$&"
 A router redirects an address directly to a pipe command (for example, from an
 alias or forward file). In this case, &$address_pipe$& contains the text of the
 pipe command, and the &%command%& option on the transport is ignored. If only
@@ -20261,7 +20527,7 @@ details of the local delivery environment and chapter &<<CHAPbatching>>&
 for a discussion of local delivery batching.
 
 
-.section "Concurrent delivery"
+.section "Concurrent delivery" "SECID140"
 If two messages arrive at almost the same time, and both are routed to a pipe
 delivery, the two pipe transports may be run concurrently. You must ensure that
 any pipe commands you set up are robust against this happening. If the commands
@@ -20270,7 +20536,7 @@ write to a file, the &%exim_lock%& utility might be of use.
 
 
 
-.section "Returned status and data"
+.section "Returned status and data" "SECID141"
 .cindex "&(pipe)& transport" "returned data"
 If the command exits with a non-zero return code, the delivery is deemed to
 have failed, unless either the &%ignore_status%& option is set (in which case
@@ -20338,7 +20604,7 @@ command = /bin/sh -c ${lookup{$local_part}lsearch{/some/file}}
 
 .cindex "transport" "filter"
 .cindex "filter" "transport filter"
-.cindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
+.vindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
 Special handling takes place when an argument consists of precisely the text
 &`$pipe_addresses`&. This is not a general expansion variable; the only
 place this string is recognized is when it appears as an argument for a pipe or
@@ -20414,7 +20680,7 @@ by the router's &%transport_home_directory%& option, which defaults to the
 user's home directory if &%check_local_user%& is set.
 
 
-.section "Private options for pipe"
+.section "Private options for pipe" "SECID142"
 .cindex "options" "&(pipe)& transport"
 
 
@@ -20561,12 +20827,15 @@ The suffix can be suppressed by setting
 message_suffix =
 .endd
 
-.option path pipe string &`/bin:/usr/bin`&
+.option path pipe string "see below"
 This option specifies the string that is set up in the PATH environment
-variable of the subprocess. If the &%command%& option does not yield an
-absolute path name, the command is sought in the PATH directories, in the usual
-way. &*Warning*&: This does not apply to a command specified as a transport
-filter.
+variable of the subprocess. The default is:
+.code
+/bin:/usr/bin
+.endd
+If the &%command%& option does not yield an absolute path name, the command is
+sought in the PATH directories, in the usual way. &*Warning*&: This does not
+apply to a command specified as a transport filter.
 
 
 .option pipe_as_creator pipe boolean false
@@ -20673,7 +20942,7 @@ end with &`\r\n`& if &%use_crlf%& is set.
 
 
 .option use_shell pipe boolean false
-.cindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
+.vindex "&$pipe_addresses$&"
 If this option is set, it causes the command to be passed to &_/bin/sh_&
 instead of being run directly from the transport, as described in section
 &<<SECThowcommandrun>>&. This is less secure, but is needed in some situations
@@ -20685,7 +20954,7 @@ its &%-c%& option.
 
 
 
-.section "Using an external local delivery agent"
+.section "Using an external local delivery agent" "SECID143"
 .cindex "local delivery" "using an external agent"
 .cindex "&'procmail'&"
 .cindex "external local delivery"
@@ -20775,7 +21044,7 @@ explicitly for the transport. Timeout and retry processing (see chapter
 &<<CHAPretry>>&) is applied to each IP address independently.
 
 
-.section "Multiple messages on a single connection"
+.section "Multiple messages on a single connection" "SECID144"
 The sending of multiple messages over a single TCP/IP connection can arise in
 two ways:
 
@@ -20804,9 +21073,9 @@ no further messages are sent over that connection.
 
 
 
-.section "Use of the $host variable"
-.cindex "&$host$&"
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.section "Use of the $host variable" "SECID145"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 At the start of a run of the &(smtp)& transport, the values of &$host$& and
 &$host_address$& are the name and IP address of the first host on the host list
 passed by the router. However, when the transport is about to connect to a
@@ -20817,12 +21086,11 @@ that are in force when the &%helo_data%&, &%hosts_try_auth%&, &%interface%&,
 
 
 
-.section "Private options for smtp"
+.section "Private options for smtp" "SECID146"
 .cindex "options" "&(smtp)& transport"
 The private options of the &(smtp)& transport are as follows:
 
 
-.new
 .option address_retry_include_sender smtp boolean true
 .cindex "4&'xx'& responses" "retrying after"
 When an address is delayed because of a 4&'xx'& response to a RCPT command, it
@@ -20831,7 +21099,6 @@ runs until the retry time is reached. You can delay the recipient without
 reference to the sender (which is what earlier versions of Exim did), by
 setting &%address_retry_include_sender%& false. However, this can lead to
 problems with servers that regularly issue 4&'xx'& responses to RCPT commands.
-.wen
 
 .option allow_localhost smtp boolean false
 .cindex "local host" "sending to"
@@ -20987,7 +21254,6 @@ This is the timeout that applies while waiting for the response to the final
 line containing just &"."& that terminates a message. Its value must not be
 zero.
 
-
 .option gethostbyname smtp boolean false
 If this option is true when the &%hosts%& and/or &%fallback_hosts%& options are
 being used, names are looked up using &[gethostbyname()]&
@@ -20995,14 +21261,46 @@ being used, names are looked up using &[gethostbyname()]&
 instead of using the DNS. Of course, that function may in fact use the DNS, but
 it may also consult other sources of information such as &_/etc/hosts_&.
 
-.option helo_data smtp string&!! &`$primary_hostname`&
-.cindex "HELO argument" "setting"
-.cindex "EHLO argument" "setting"
-.cindex "LHLO argument" "setting"
-The value of this option is expanded, and used as the argument for the EHLO,
-HELO, or LHLO command that starts the outgoing SMTP or LMTP session. The
-variables &$host$& and &$host_address$& are set to the identity of the remote
-host, and can be used to generate different values for different servers.
+.new
+.option gnutls_require_kx main string unset
+This option controls the key exchange mechanisms when GnuTLS is used in an Exim
+client. For details, see section &<<SECTreqciphgnu>>&.
+
+.option gnutls_require_mac main string unset
+This option controls the MAC algorithms when GnuTLS is used in an Exim
+client. For details, see section &<<SECTreqciphgnu>>&.
+
+.option gnutls_require_protocols main string unset
+This option controls the protocols when GnuTLS is used in an Exim
+client. For details, see section &<<SECTreqciphgnu>>&.
+.wen
+
+.new
+.option helo_data smtp string&!! "see below"
+.cindex "HELO" "argument, setting"
+.cindex "EHLO" "argument, setting"
+.cindex "LHLO argument setting"
+The value of this option is expanded after a connection to a another host has
+been set up. The result is used as the argument for the EHLO, HELO, or LHLO
+command that starts the outgoing SMTP or LMTP session. The default value of the
+option is:
+.code
+$primary_hostname
+.endd
+During the expansion, the variables &$host$& and &$host_address$& are set to
+the identity of the remote host, and the variables &$sending_ip_address$& and
+&$sending_port$& are set to the local IP address and port number that are being
+used. These variables can be therefore used to generate different values for
+different servers or different local IP addresses. For example, if you want the
+string that is used for &%helo_data%& to be obtained by a DNS lookup of the
+outgoing interface address, you could use this:
+.code
+helo_data = ${lookup dnsdb{ptr=$sending_ip_address}{$value}\
+  {$primary_hostname}}
+.endd
+The use of &%helo_data%& applies both to sending messages and when doing
+callouts.
+.wen
 
 .option hosts smtp "string list&!!" unset
 Hosts are associated with an address by a router such as &(dnslookup)&, which
@@ -21038,7 +21336,7 @@ unless &%hosts_randomize%& is set.
 
 
 .option hosts_avoid_esmtp smtp "host list&!!" unset
-.cindex "ESMTP" "avoiding use of"
+.cindex "ESMTPavoiding use of"
 .cindex "HELO" "forcing use of"
 .cindex "EHLO" "avoiding use of"
 .cindex "PIPELINING" "avoiding the use of"
@@ -21049,6 +21347,14 @@ start of the SMTP session. This means that it cannot use any of the ESMTP
 facilities such as AUTH, PIPELINING, SIZE, and STARTTLS.
 
 
+.new
+.option hosts_avoid_pipelining smtp "host list&!!" unset
+.cindex "PIPELINING" "avoiding the use of"
+Exim will not use the SMTP PIPELINING extension when delivering to any host
+that matches this list, even if the server host advertises PIPELINING support.
+.wen
+
+
 .option hosts_avoid_tls smtp "host list&!!" unset
 .cindex "TLS" "avoiding for certain hosts"
 Exim will not try to start a TLS session when delivering to any host that
@@ -21096,7 +21402,7 @@ attached to the address are ignored, and instead the hosts specified by the
 If this option is set, and either the list of hosts is taken from the
 &%hosts%& or the &%fallback_hosts%& option, or the hosts supplied by the router
 were not obtained from MX records (this includes fallback hosts from the
-router), and were not randomizied by the router, the order of trying the hosts
+router), and were not randomized by the router, the order of trying the hosts
 is randomized each time the transport runs. Randomizing the order of a host
 list can be used to do crude load sharing.
 
@@ -21138,11 +21444,10 @@ unauthenticated. See also &%hosts_require_auth%&, and chapter
 &<<CHAPSMTPAUTH>>& for details of authentication.
 
 .option interface smtp "string list&!!" unset
-.new
 .cindex "bind IP address"
 .cindex "IP address" "binding"
-.cindex "&$host$&"
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 This option specifies which interface to bind to when making an outgoing SMTP
 call. &*Note:*& Do not confuse this with the interface address that was used
 when a message was received, which is in &$received_ip_address$&, formerly
@@ -21150,7 +21455,6 @@ known as &$interface_address$&. The name was changed to minimize confusion with
 the outgoing interface address. There is no variable that contains an outgoing
 interface address because, unless it is set by this option, its value is
 unknown.
-.wen
 
 During the expansion of the &%interface%& option the variables &$host$& and
 &$host_address$& refer to the host to which a connection is about to be made
@@ -21172,7 +21476,7 @@ interface to use if the host has more than one.
 This option controls the setting of SO_KEEPALIVE on outgoing TCP/IP socket
 connections. When set, it causes the kernel to probe idle connections
 periodically, by sending packets with &"old"& sequence numbers. The other end
-of the connection should send a acknowledgement if the connection is still okay
+of the connection should send a acknowledgment if the connection is still okay
 or a reset if the connection has been aborted. The reason for doing this is
 that it has the beneficial effect of freeing up certain types of connection
 that can get stuck when the remote host is disconnected without tidying up the
@@ -21195,7 +21499,7 @@ permits this.
 
 
 .option multi_domain smtp boolean true
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
 When this option is set, the &(smtp)& transport can handle a number of
 addresses containing a mixture of different domains provided they all resolve
 to the same list of hosts. Turning the option off restricts the transport to
@@ -21205,7 +21509,6 @@ is a single domain involved in a remote delivery.
 
 
 .option port smtp string&!! "see below"
-.new
 .cindex "port" "sending TCP/IP"
 .cindex "TCP/IP" "setting outgoing port"
 This option specifies the TCP/IP port on the server to which Exim connects.
@@ -21213,7 +21516,6 @@ This option specifies the TCP/IP port on the server to which Exim connects.
 received, which is in &$received_port$&, formerly known as &$interface_port$&.
 The name was changed to minimize confusion with the outgoing port. There is no
 variable that contains an outgoing port.
-.wen
 
 If the value of this option begins with a digit it is taken as a port number;
 otherwise it is looked up using &[getservbyname()]&. The default value is
@@ -21289,10 +21591,10 @@ the use of the SIZE option altogether.
 
 
 .option tls_certificate smtp string&!! unset
-.cindex "TLS client certificate" "location of"
-.cindex "certificate for client" "location of"
-.cindex "&$host$&"
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.cindex "TLS" "client certificate, location of"
+.cindex "certificate" "client, location of"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 The value of this option must be the absolute path to a file which contains the
 client's certificate, for possible use when sending a message over an encrypted
 connection. The values of &$host$& and &$host_address$& are set to the name and
@@ -21314,9 +21616,9 @@ be the name of a file that contains a CRL in PEM format.
 
 
 .option tls_privatekey smtp string&!! unset
-.cindex "TLS client private key" "location of"
-.cindex "&$host$&"
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.cindex "TLS" "client private key, location of"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 The value of this option must be the absolute path to a file which contains the
 client's private key. This is used when sending a message over an encrypted
 connection using a client certificate. The values of &$host$& and
@@ -21329,8 +21631,8 @@ the certificate. See chapter &<<CHAPTLS>>& for details of TLS.
 .option tls_require_ciphers smtp string&!! unset
 .cindex "TLS" "requiring specific ciphers"
 .cindex "cipher" "requiring specific"
-.cindex "&$host$&"
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 The value of this option must be a list of permitted cipher suites, for use
 when setting up an outgoing encrypted connection. (There is a global option of
 the same name for controlling incoming connections.) The values of &$host$& and
@@ -21358,8 +21660,8 @@ in clear.
 .option tls_verify_certificates smtp string&!! unset
 .cindex "TLS" "server certificate verification"
 .cindex "certificate" "verification of server"
-.cindex "&$host$&"
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
+.vindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
 The value of this option must be the absolute path to a file containing
 permitted server certificates, for use when setting up an encrypted connection.
 Alternatively, if you are using OpenSSL, you can set
@@ -21472,7 +21774,7 @@ such a domain should be rewritten using the &"canonical"& name, and some MTAs
 do this. The new RFCs do not contain this suggestion.
 
 
-.section "Explicitly configured address rewriting"
+.section "Explicitly configured address rewriting" "SECID147"
 This chapter describes the rewriting rules that can be used in the
 main rewrite section of the configuration file, and also in the generic
 &%headers_rewrite%& option that can be set on any transport.
@@ -21522,13 +21824,13 @@ A host rewrites the local parts of its own users so that, for example,
 
 
 
-.section "When does rewriting happen?"
+.section "When does rewriting happen?" "SECID148"
 .cindex "rewriting" "timing of"
 .cindex "&ACL;" "rewriting addresses in"
 Configured address rewriting can take place at several different stages of a
 message's processing.
 
-.cindex "&$sender_address$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_address$&"
 At the start of an ACL for MAIL, the sender address may have been rewritten
 by a special SMTP-time rewrite rule (see section &<<SECTrewriteS>>&), but no
 ordinary rewrite rules have yet been applied. If, however, the sender address
@@ -21538,8 +21840,8 @@ rewritten address. This also applies if sender verification happens in a
 RCPT ACL. Otherwise, when the sender address is not verified, it is
 rewritten as soon as a message's header lines have been received.
 
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 Similarly, at the start of an ACL for RCPT, the current recipient's address
 may have been rewritten by a special SMTP-time rewrite rule, but no ordinary
 rewrite rules have yet been applied to it. However, the behaviour is different
@@ -21577,7 +21879,7 @@ transport time.
 
 
 
-.section "Testing the rewriting rules that apply on input"
+.section "Testing the rewriting rules that apply on input" "SECID149"
 .cindex "rewriting" "testing"
 .cindex "testing" "rewriting"
 Exim's input rewriting configuration appears in a part of the run time
@@ -21607,7 +21909,7 @@ present time, there is no equivalent way of testing rewriting rules that are
 set for a particular transport.
 
 
-.section "Rewriting rules"
+.section "Rewriting rules" "SECID150"
 .cindex "rewriting" "rules"
 The rewrite section of the configuration file consists of lines of rewriting
 rules in the form
@@ -21637,8 +21939,8 @@ address in &'To:'& must not assume that the message's address in &'From:'& has
 (or has not) already been rewritten. However, a rewrite of &'From:'& may assume
 that the envelope sender has already been rewritten.
 
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 The variables &$local_part$& and &$domain$& can be used in the replacement
 string to refer to the address that is being rewritten. Note that lookup-driven
 rewriting can be done by a rule of the form
@@ -21649,7 +21951,7 @@ where the lookup key uses &$1$& and &$2$& or &$local_part$& and &$domain$& to
 refer to the address that is being rewritten.
 
 
-.section "Rewriting patterns"
+.section "Rewriting patterns" "SECID151"
 .cindex "rewriting" "patterns"
 .cindex "address list" "in a rewriting pattern"
 The source pattern in a rewriting rule is any item which may appear in an
@@ -21710,7 +22012,7 @@ whole domain. For non-partial domain lookups, no numerical variables are set.
 .endlist
 
 
-.section "Rewriting replacements"
+.section "Rewriting replacements" "SECID152"
 .cindex "rewriting" "replacements"
 If the replacement string for a rule is a single asterisk, addresses that
 match the pattern and the flags are &'not'& rewritten, and no subsequent
@@ -21721,8 +22023,8 @@ hatta@lookingglass.fict.example  *  f
 specifies that &'hatta@lookingglass.fict.example'& is never to be rewritten in
 &'From:'& headers.
 
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 If the replacement string is not a single asterisk, it is expanded, and must
 yield a fully qualified address. Within the expansion, the variables
 &$local_part$& and &$domain$& refer to the address that is being rewritten.
@@ -21736,7 +22038,7 @@ entry written to the panic log.
 
 
 
-.section "Rewriting flags"
+.section "Rewriting flags" "SECID153"
 There are three different kinds of flag that may appear on rewriting rules:
 
 .ilist
@@ -21753,7 +22055,8 @@ E, F, T, and S are not permitted.
 
 
 
-.section "Flags specifying which headers and envelope addresses to rewrite"
+.section "Flags specifying which headers and envelope addresses to rewrite" &&&
+         "SECID154"
 .cindex "rewriting" "flags"
 If none of the following flag letters, nor the &"S"& flag (see section
 &<<SECTrewriteS>>&) are present, a main rewriting rule applies to all headers
@@ -21786,8 +22089,8 @@ before any other processing; even before syntax checking. The pattern is
 required to be a regular expression, and it is matched against the whole of the
 data for the command, including any surrounding angle brackets.
 
-.cindex "&$domain$&"
-.cindex "&$local_part$&"
+.vindex "&$domain$&"
+.vindex "&$local_part$&"
 This form of rewrite rule allows for the handling of addresses that are not
 compliant with RFCs 2821 and 2822 (for example, &"bang paths"& in batched SMTP
 input). Because the input is not required to be a syntactically valid address,
@@ -21796,7 +22099,7 @@ expansion of the replacement string. The result of rewriting replaces the
 original address in the MAIL or RCPT command.
 
 
-.section "Flags controlling the rewriting process"
+.section "Flags controlling the rewriting process" "SECID155"
 There are four flags which control the way the rewriting process works. These
 take effect only when a rule is invoked, that is, when the address is of the
 correct type (matches the flags) and matches the pattern:
@@ -21841,7 +22144,7 @@ rewritten, all but the working part of the replacement address is discarded.
 .endlist
 
 
-.section "Rewriting examples"
+.section "Rewriting examples" "SECID156"
 Here is an example of the two common rewriting paradigms:
 .code
 *@*.hitch.fict.example  $1@hitch.fict.example
@@ -21903,7 +22206,7 @@ can be done on the rewritten addresses.
 . ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
 
 .chapter "Retry configuration" "CHAPretry"
-.scindex IIDretconf1 "retry configuration" "description of"
+.scindex IIDretconf1 "retry" "configuration, description of"
 .scindex IIDregconf2 "configuration file" "retry section"
 The &"retry"& section of the run time configuration file contains a list of
 retry rules that control how often Exim tries to deliver messages that cannot
@@ -21941,7 +22244,7 @@ suffers a temporary failure, the retry data is updated as normal, and
 subsequent delivery attempts from queue runs occur only when the retry time for
 the local address is reached.
 
-.section "Changing retry rules"
+.section "Changing retry rules" "SECID157"
 If you change the retry rules in your configuration, you should consider
 whether or not to delete the retry data that is stored in Exim's spool area in
 files with names like &_db/retry_&. Deleting any of Exim's hints files is
@@ -21956,7 +22259,7 @@ messages that it should now be retaining.
 
 
 
-.section "Format of retry rules"
+.section "Format of retry rules" "SECID158"
 .cindex "retry" "rules"
 Each retry rule occupies one line and consists of three or four parts,
 separated by white space: a pattern, an error name, an optional list of sender
@@ -21996,7 +22299,7 @@ expressions work in address lists.
 .endd
 
 
-.section "Choosing which retry rule to use for address errors"
+.section "Choosing which retry rule to use for address errors" "SECID159"
 When Exim is looking for a retry rule after a routing attempt has failed (for
 example, after a DNS timeout), each line in the retry configuration is tested
 against the complete address only if &%retry_use_local_part%& is set for the
@@ -22012,7 +22315,6 @@ configuration is tested against the complete address only if
 &%retry_use_local_part%& is set for the transport (it defaults true for all
 local transports).
 
-.new
 .cindex "4&'xx'& responses" "retry rules for"
 However, when Exim is looking for a retry rule after a remote delivery attempt
 suffers an address error (a 4&'xx'& SMTP response for a recipient address), the
@@ -22024,11 +22326,11 @@ reached. You can delay the recipient without regard to the sender by setting
 &%address_retry_include_sender%& false in the &(smtp)& transport but this can
 lead to problems with servers that regularly issue 4&'xx'& responses to RCPT
 commands.
-.wen
 
 
 
-.section "Choosing which retry rule to use for host and message errors"
+.section "Choosing which retry rule to use for host and message errors" &&&
+         "SECID160"
 For a temporary error that is not related to an individual address (for
 example, a connection timeout), each line in the retry configuration is checked
 twice. First, the name of the remote host is used as a domain name (preceded by
@@ -22066,7 +22368,7 @@ route_list = *.a.example  192.168.34.23
 then the &"host name"& that is used when searching for a retry rule is the
 textual form of the IP address.
 
-.section "Retry rules for specific errors"
+.section "Retry rules for specific errors" "SECID161"
 .cindex "retry" "specific errors; specifying"
 The second field in a retry rule is the name of a particular error, or an
 asterisk, which matches any error. The errors that can be tested for are:
@@ -22182,7 +22484,7 @@ error).
 
 
 
-.section "Retry rules for specified senders"
+.section "Retry rules for specified senders" "SECID162"
 .cindex "retry" "rules; sender-specific"
 You can specify retry rules that apply only when the failing message has a
 specific sender. In particular, this can be used to define retry rules that
@@ -22219,7 +22521,7 @@ list is never matched.
 
 
 
-.section "Retry parameters"
+.section "Retry parameters" "SECID163"
 .cindex "retry" "parameters in rules"
 The third (or fourth, if a senders list is present) field in a retry rule is a
 sequence of retry parameter sets, separated by semicolons. Each set consists of
@@ -22248,7 +22550,7 @@ is used to increase the size of the interval at each retry.
 .next
 &'H'&: retry at randomized intervals. The arguments are as for &'G'&. For each
 retry, the previous interval is multiplied by the factor in order to get a
-maximum for the next interval. The mininum interval is the first argument of
+maximum for the next interval. The minimum interval is the first argument of
 the parameter, and an actual interval is chosen randomly between them. Such a
 rule has been found to be helpful in cluster configurations when all the
 members of the cluster restart at once, and may therefore synchronize their
@@ -22263,7 +22565,7 @@ current time. For geometrically increasing intervals, retry intervals are
 computed from the rule's parameters until one that is greater than the previous
 interval is found. The main configuration variable
 .cindex "limit" "retry interval"
-.cindex "retry interval" "maximum"
+.cindex "retry" "interval, maximum"
 .cindex "&%retry_interval_max%&"
 &%retry_interval_max%& limits the maximum interval between retries. It
 cannot be set greater than &`24h`&, which is its default value.
@@ -22297,7 +22599,7 @@ are for the hosts associated with a particular mail domain, and also for local
 deliveries that have been deferred.
 
 
-.section "Retry rule examples"
+.section "Retry rule examples" "SECID164"
 Here are some example retry rules:
 .code
 alice@wonderland.fict.example quota_5d  F,7d,3h
@@ -22335,7 +22637,7 @@ hours, then with intervals starting at one hour and increasing by a factor of
 
 
 
-.section "Timeout of retry data"
+.section "Timeout of retry data" "SECID165"
 .cindex "timeout" "of retry data"
 .cindex "&%retry_data_expire%&"
 .cindex "hints database" "data expiry"
@@ -22359,8 +22661,8 @@ message at least once every 7 days the retry data never expires.
 
 
 
-.section "Long-term failures"
-.cindex "delivery failure" "long-term"
+.section "Long-term failures" "SECID166"
+.cindex "delivery failurelong-term"
 .cindex "retry" "after long-term failure"
 Special processing happens when an email address has been failing for so long
 that the cutoff time for the last algorithm is reached. For example, using the
@@ -22409,7 +22711,7 @@ If there is a continuous stream of messages for the failing domains, setting
 deliver to permanently failing IP addresses than when &%delay_after_cutoff%& is
 true.
 
-.section "Deliveries that work intermittently"
+.section "Deliveries that work intermittently" "SECID167"
 .cindex "retry" "intermittently working deliveries"
 Some additional logic is needed to cope with cases where a host is
 intermittently available, or when a message has some attribute that prevents
@@ -22552,7 +22854,7 @@ in Exim.
 
 
 
-.section "Generic options for authenticators"
+.section "Generic options for authenticators" "SECID168"
 .cindex "authentication" "generic options"
 .cindex "options" "generic; for authenticators"
 
@@ -22579,7 +22881,6 @@ forced, and was not caused by a lookup defer, the incident is logged.
 See section &<<SECTauthexiser>>& below for further discussion.
 
 
-.new
 .option server_condition authenticators string&!! unset
 This option must be set for a &%plaintext%& server authenticator, where it
 is used directly to control authentication. See section &<<SECTplainserver>>&
@@ -22595,7 +22896,6 @@ string, &"0"&, &"no"&, or &"false"&, authentication fails. If the result of the
 expansion is &"1"&, &"yes"&, or &"true"&, authentication succeeds. For any
 other result, a temporary error code is returned, with the expanded string as
 the error text.
-.wen
 
 
 .option server_debug_print authenticators string&!! unset
@@ -22608,7 +22908,7 @@ output, and Exim carries on processing.
 
 
 .option server_set_id authenticators string&!! unset
-.cindex "&$authenticated_id$&"
+.vindex "&$authenticated_id$&"
 When an Exim server successfully authenticates a client, this string is
 expanded using data from the authentication, and preserved for any incoming
 messages in the variable &$authenticated_id$&. It is also included in the log
@@ -22643,7 +22943,7 @@ than EHLO), the use of AUTH= is a syntax error.
 .next
 If the value of the AUTH= parameter is &"<>"&, it is ignored.
 .next
-.cindex "&$authenticated_sender$&"
+.vindex "&$authenticated_sender$&"
 If &%acl_smtp_mailauth%& is defined, the ACL it specifies is run. While it is
 running, the value of &$authenticated_sender$& is set to the value obtained
 from the AUTH= parameter. If the ACL does not yield &"accept"&, the value of
@@ -22671,7 +22971,7 @@ hosts to which Exim authenticates as a client. Do not confuse this value with
 &$authenticated_id$&, which is a string obtained from the authentication
 process, and which is not usually a complete email address.
 
-.cindex "&$sender_address$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_address$&"
 Whenever an AUTH= value is ignored, the incident is logged. The ACL for
 MAIL, if defined, is run after AUTH= is accepted or ignored. It can
 therefore make use of &$authenticated_sender$&. The converse is not true: the
@@ -22710,12 +23010,12 @@ so that no authentication mechanisms are advertised to them.
 
 The &%server_advertise_condition%& controls the advertisement of individual
 authentication mechanisms. For example, it can be used to restrict the
-advertisement of a patricular mechanism to encrypted connections, by a setting
+advertisement of a particular mechanism to encrypted connections, by a setting
 such as:
 .code
 server_advertise_condition = ${if eq{$tls_cipher}{}{no}{yes}}
 .endd
-.cindex "&$tls_cipher$&"
+.vindex "&$tls_cipher$&"
 If the session is encrypted, &$tls_cipher$& is not empty, and so the expansion
 yields &"yes"&, which allows the advertisement to happen.
 
@@ -22744,8 +23044,8 @@ the appropriate authentication protocol, and authentication either succeeds or
 fails. If there is no matching advertised mechanism, the AUTH command is
 rejected with a 504 error.
 
-.cindex "&$received_protocol$&"
-.cindex "&$sender_host_authenticated$&"
+.vindex "&$received_protocol$&"
+.vindex "&$sender_host_authenticated$&"
 When a message is received from an authenticated host, the value of
 &$received_protocol$& is set to &"esmtpa"& or &"esmtpsa"& instead of &"esmtp"&
 or &"esmtps"&, and &$sender_host_authenticated$& contains the name (not the
@@ -22756,7 +23056,7 @@ no successful authentication.
 
 
 
-.section "Testing server authentication"
+.section "Testing server authentication" "SECID169"
 .cindex "authentication" "testing a server"
 .cindex "AUTH" "testing a server"
 .cindex "base64 encoding" "creating authentication test data"
@@ -22805,7 +23105,7 @@ should check your version before relying on this suggestion.
 
 
 
-.section "Authentication by an Exim client"
+.section "Authentication by an Exim client" "SECID170"
 .cindex "authentication" "on an Exim client"
 The &(smtp)& transport has two options called &%hosts_require_auth%& and
 &%hosts_try_auth%&. When the &(smtp)& transport connects to a server that
@@ -22813,20 +23113,21 @@ announces support for authentication, and the host matches an entry in either
 of these options, Exim (as a client) tries to authenticate as follows:
 
 .ilist
-For each authenticator that is configured as a client, it searches the
-authentication mechanisms announced by the server for one whose name
-matches the public name of the authenticator.
-.next
-.cindex "&$host$&"
-.cindex "&$host_address$&"
-When it finds one that matches, it runs the authenticator's client code.
-The variables &$host$& and &$host_address$& are available for any string
-expansions that the client might do. They are set to the server's name and
-IP address. If any expansion is forced to fail, the authentication attempt
-is abandoned,
-and Exim moves on to the next authenticator.
-Otherwise an expansion failure causes delivery to be
-deferred.
+.new
+For each authenticator that is configured as a client, in the order in which
+they are defined in the configuration, it searches the authentication
+mechanisms announced by the server for one whose name matches the public name
+of the authenticator.
+.wen
+.next
+.vindex "&$host$&"
+.vindex "&$host_address$&"
+When it finds one that matches, it runs the authenticator's client code. The
+variables &$host$& and &$host_address$& are available for any string expansions
+that the client might do. They are set to the server's name and IP address. If