Doc: tls_require_ciphers examples
authorPhil Pennock <pdp@exim.org>
Wed, 23 May 2012 16:25:16 +0000 (12:25 -0400)
committerPhil Pennock <pdp@exim.org>
Wed, 23 May 2012 16:25:16 +0000 (12:25 -0400)
Note how to test strings, provide examples which distinguish port 25 from other ports.
Carefully used short examples, but allows two different strings per implementation
and demonstrates how the strings are very different.

doc/doc-docbook/spec.xfpt

index 1c2fa84..96f35fe 100644 (file)
@@ -25068,7 +25068,10 @@ There is a function in the OpenSSL library that can be passed a list of cipher
 suites before the cipher negotiation takes place. This specifies which ciphers
 are acceptable. The list is colon separated and may contain names like
 DES-CBC3-SHA. Exim passes the expanded value of &%tls_require_ciphers%&
-directly to this function call. The following quotation from the OpenSSL
+directly to this function call.
+Many systems will install the OpenSSL manual-pages, so you may have
+&'ciphers(1)'& available to you.
+The following quotation from the OpenSSL
 documentation specifies what forms of item are allowed in the cipher string:
 
 .ilist
@@ -25105,6 +25108,26 @@ includes any ciphers already present they will be ignored: that is, they will
 not be moved to the end of the list.
 .endlist
 
+.new
+The OpenSSL &'ciphers(1)'& command may be used to test the results of a given
+string:
+.code
+# note single-quotes to get ! past any shell history expansion
+$ openssl ciphers 'HIGH:!MD5:!SHA1'
+.endd
+
+This example will let the library defaults be permitted on the MX port, where
+there's probably no identity verification anyway, but ups the ante on the
+submission ports where the administrator might have some influence on the
+choice of clients used:
+.code
+# OpenSSL variant; see man ciphers(1)
+tls_require_ciphers = ${if =={$received_port}{25}\
+                           {DEFAULT}\
+                           {HIGH:!MD5:!SHA1}}
+.endd
+.wen
+
 
 
 .new
@@ -25132,11 +25155,27 @@ aware of future feature enhancements of GnuTLS.
 
 Documentation of the strings accepted may be found in the GnuTLS manual, under
 "Priority strings".  This is online as
-&url(http://www.gnu.org/software/gnutls/manual/html_node/Priority-Strings.html).
+&url(http://www.gnu.org/software/gnutls/manual/html_node/Priority-Strings.html),
+but beware that this relates to GnuTLS 3, which may be newer than the version
+installed on your system.  If you are using GnuTLS 3,
+&url(http://www.gnu.org/software/gnutls/manual/html_node/Listing-the-ciphersuites-in-a-priority-string.html, then the example code)
+on that site can be used to test a given string.
 
 Prior to Exim 4.80, an older API of GnuTLS was used, and Exim supported three
 additional options, "&%gnutls_require_kx%&", "&%gnutls_require_mac%&" and
 "&%gnutls_require_protocols%&".  &%tls_require_ciphers%& was an Exim list.
+
+This example will let the library defaults be permitted on the MX port, where
+there's probably no identity verification anyway, and lowers security further
+by increasing compatibility; but this ups the ante on the submission ports
+where the administrator might have some influence on the choice of clients
+used:
+.code
+# GnuTLS variant
+tls_require_ciphers = ${if =={$received_port}{25}\
+                           {NORMAL:%COMPAT}\
+                           {SECURE128}}
+.endd
 .wen