Removed support for Linux-libc5. It must be well obsolete, and the code
[exim.git] / src / scripts / os-type
index 60d1730..8fe574d 100755 (executable)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 #! /bin/sh
-# $Cambridge: exim/src/scripts/os-type,v 1.3 2005/04/06 10:53:47 ph10 Exp $
+# $Cambridge: exim/src/scripts/os-type,v 1.4 2005/06/27 10:40:14 ph10 Exp $
 
 # Shell script to determine the operating system type. Some of the heuristics
 # herein have accumulated over the years and may not strictly be needed now,
@@ -125,22 +125,11 @@ SunOS5) case `uname -m` in
         esac
         ;;
 
-# In the case of Linux we need to distinguish which libc is used.
-# This is more cautious than it needs to be. In practice libc5 will always
-# be a symlink, and libc6 will always be a linker control file, but it's
-# easy enough to do a better check, and check the symlink destination or the
-# control file contents and make sure.
-
-Linux)  if [ -L /usr/lib/libc.so ]; then
-            if [ x"$(file /usr/lib/libc.so | grep "libc.so.5")"x != xx ]; then
-                    os=Linux-libc5
-            fi
-        else
-            if grep -q libc.so.5 /usr/lib/libc.so; then
-                    os=Linux-libc5
-            fi
-        fi
-        ;;
+# In the case of Linux we used to distinguish which libc was used so that
+# the old libc5 was supported as well as the current glibc. This support
+# was giving some people problems, so it was removed in June 2005, under
+# the assumption that nobody would be using libc5 any more (it is over seven
+# years old).
 
 # In the case of NetBSD we need to distinguish between a.out, ELF
 # and COFF binary formats.  However, a.out and COFF are the same