Hopefully the final lot of test files.
[exim.git] / src / scripts / os-type
1 #! /bin/sh
2 # $Cambridge: exim/src/scripts/os-type,v 1.4 2005/06/27 10:40:14 ph10 Exp $
3
4 # Shell script to determine the operating system type. Some of the heuristics
5 # herein have accumulated over the years and may not strictly be needed now,
6 # but they are left in under the principle of "If it ain't broke, don't fix
7 # it."
8
9 # For some OS there are two variants: a full name, which is used for the
10 # build directory, and a generic name, which is used to identify the OS-
11 # specific scripts, and which can be the same for different versions of
12 # the OS. Solaris 2 is one such OS. The option -generic specifies the
13 # latter type of output.
14
15 # If EXIM_OSTYPE is set, use it. This allows a manual override.
16
17 case "$EXIM_OSTYPE" in ?*) os="$EXIM_OSTYPE";; esac
18
19 # Otherwise, try to get a value from the uname command. Use an explicit
20 # option just in case there are any systems where -s is not the default.
21
22 case "$os" in '') os=`uname -s`;; esac
23
24 # Identify Glibc systems under different names.
25
26 case "$os" in GNU) os=GNU;; esac
27 case "$os" in GNU/*|Linux) os=Linux;; esac
28
29 # It is believed that all systems respond to uname -s, but just in case
30 # there is one that doesn't, use the shell's $OSTYPE variable. It is known
31 # to be unhelpful for some systems (under IRIX is it "irix" and under BSDI
32 # 3.0 it may be "386BSD") but those systems respond to uname -s, so this
33 # doesn't matter.
34
35 case "$os" in '') os="$OSTYPE";; esac
36
37 # Failed to find OS type.
38
39 case "$os" in
40 '') echo "" 1>&2
41     echo "*** Failed to determine the operating system type." 1>&2
42     echo "" 1>&2
43     echo UnKnown
44     exit 1;;
45 esac
46
47 # Clean out gash characters
48
49 os=`echo $os | sed 's,[^-+_.a-zA-Z0-9],,g'`
50
51 # A value has been obtained for the os. Some massaging may be needed in
52 # some cases to get a uniform set of values. In earlier versions of this
53 # script, $OSTYPE was looked at before uname -s, and various shells set it
54 # to things that are subtly different. It is possible that some of this may
55 # no longer be needed.
56
57 case "$os" in
58 aix*)       os=AIX;;
59 AIX*)       os=AIX;;
60 bsdi*)      os=BSDI;;
61 BSDOS)      os=BSDI;;
62 BSD_OS)     os=BSDI;;
63 CYGWIN*)    os=CYGWIN;;
64 dgux)       os=DGUX;;
65 freebsd*)   os=FreeBSD;;
66 gnu)        os=GNU;;
67 Irix5)      os=IRIX;;
68 Irix6)      os=IRIX6;;
69 IRIX64)     os=IRIX6;;
70 irix6.5)    os=IRIX65;;
71 IRIX)       version=`uname -r`
72             case "$version" in
73             5*)  os=IRIX;;
74             6.5) version=`uname -R | awk '{print $NF}'`
75                  version=`echo $version | sed 's,[^-+_a-zA-Z0-9],,g'`
76                  os=IRIX$version;;
77             6*)  os=IRIX632;;
78             esac;;
79 HI-OSF1-MJ) os=HI-OSF;;
80 HI-UXMPP)   os=HI-OSF;;
81 hpux*)      os=HP-UX;;
82 linux)      os=Linux;;
83 linux-*)    os=Linux;;
84 Linux-*)    os=Linux;;
85 netbsd*)    os=NetBSD;;
86 openbsd*)   os=OpenBSD;;
87 osf1)       os=OSF1;;
88 qnx*)       os=QNX;;
89 solaris*)   os=SunOS5;;
90 sunos4*)    os=SunOS4;;
91 UnixWare)   os=Unixware7;;
92 Ultrix)     os=ULTRIX;;
93 ultrix*)    os=ULTRIX;;
94 esac
95
96 # In the case of SunOS we need to distinguish between SunOS4 and Solaris (aka
97 # SunOS5); in the case of BSDI we need to distinguish between versions 3 and 4;
98 # in the case of HP-UX we need to distinguish between version 9 and later.
99
100 case "$os" in
101 SunOS)  case `uname -r` in
102         5*)     os="${os}5";;
103         4*)     os="${os}4";;
104         esac;;
105
106 BSDI)   case `uname -r` in
107         3*)     os="${os}3";;
108         4.2*)   os="${os}4.2";;
109         4*)     os="${os}4";;
110         esac;;
111
112 HP-UX)  case `uname -r` in
113         A.09*)  os="${os}-9";;
114         esac;;
115 esac
116
117 # Need to distinguish Solaris from the version on the HAL (64bit sparc,
118 # CC=hcc -DV7). Also need to distinguish different versions of the OS
119 # for building different binaries.
120
121 case "$os" in
122 SunOS5) case `uname -m` in
123         sun4H)  os="${os}-hal";;
124             *)  os="${os}-`uname -r`";;
125         esac
126         ;;
127
128 # In the case of Linux we used to distinguish which libc was used so that
129 # the old libc5 was supported as well as the current glibc. This support
130 # was giving some people problems, so it was removed in June 2005, under
131 # the assumption that nobody would be using libc5 any more (it is over seven
132 # years old).
133
134 # In the case of NetBSD we need to distinguish between a.out, ELF
135 # and COFF binary formats.  However, a.out and COFF are the same
136 # for our purposes, so both of them are defined as "a.out".
137 # Todd Vierling of Wasabi Systems reported that NetBSD/sh3 (the
138 # only NetBSD port that uses COFF binary format) will switch to
139 # ELF soon.
140
141 NetBSD) if echo __ELF__ | ${CC-cc} -E - | grep -q __ELF__ ; then
142         # Non-ELF system
143         os="NetBSD-a.out"
144         fi
145         ;;
146
147 esac
148
149 # If a generic OS name is requested, some further massaging is needed
150 # for some systems.
151
152 if [ "$1" = '-generic' ]; then
153   case "$os" in
154   SunOS5*) os=SunOS5;;
155   BSDI*)   os=BSDI;;
156   IRIX65*) os=IRIX65;;
157   esac
158 fi
159
160 # OK, the script seems to have worked. Pass the value back.
161
162 echo "$os"
163
164 # End of os-type