tidying
[exim.git] / doc / doc-txt / experimental-spec.txt
1 From time to time, experimental features may be added to Exim.
2 While a feature  is experimental, there  will be a  build-time
3 option whose name starts  "EXPERIMENTAL_" that must be  set in
4 order to include the  feature. This file contains  information
5 about experimental  features, all  of which  are unstable and
6 liable to incompatible change.
7
8
9 Brightmail AntiSpam (BMI) support
10 --------------------------------------------------------------
11
12 Brightmail  AntiSpam  is  a  commercial  package.  Please  see
13 http://www.brightmail.com    for    more    information     on
14 the product. For  the sake of  clarity, we'll refer  to it  as
15 "BMI" from now on.
16
17
18 0) BMI concept and implementation overview
19
20 In  contrast  to   how  spam-scanning  with   SpamAssassin  is
21 implemented  in  exiscan-acl,  BMI  is  more  suited  for  per
22 -recipient  scanning of  messages. However,  each messages  is
23 scanned  only  once,  but  multiple  "verdicts"  for  multiple
24 recipients can be  returned from the  BMI server. The  exiscan
25 implementation  passes  the  message to  the  BMI  server just
26 before accepting it.  It then adds  the retrieved verdicts  to
27 the messages header file in the spool. These verdicts can then
28 be  queried  in  routers,  where  operation  is  per-recipient
29 instead  of per-message.  To use  BMI, you  need to  take the
30 following steps:
31
32   1) Compile Exim with BMI support
33   2) Set up main BMI options (top section of Exim config file)
34   3) Set up ACL control statement (ACL section of the config
35      file)
36   4) Set up your routers to use BMI verdicts (routers section
37      of the config file).
38   5) (Optional) Set up per-recipient opt-in information.
39
40 These four steps are explained in more details below.
41
42 1) Adding support for BMI at compile time
43
44   To compile with BMI support,  you need to link Exim  against
45   the  Brightmail  client   SDK,  consisting   of  a   library
46   (libbmiclient_single.so)  and  a  header  file  (bmi_api.h).
47   You'll also need to explicitly set a flag in the Makefile to
48   include BMI support in the Exim binary. Both can be achieved
49   with  these lines in Local/Makefile:
50
51   EXPERIMENTAL_BRIGHTMAIL=yes
52   CFLAGS=-I/path/to/the/dir/with/the/includefile
53   EXTRALIBS_EXIM=-L/path/to/the/dir/with/the/library -lbmiclient_single
54
55   If  you use  other CFLAGS  or EXTRALIBS_EXIM  settings then
56   merge the content of these lines with them.
57
58   Note for BMI6.x users: You'll also have to add -lxml2_single
59   to the EXTRALIBS_EXIM line. Users of 5.5x do not need to  do
60   this.
61
62   You    should     also    include     the    location     of
63   libbmiclient_single.so in your dynamic linker  configuration
64   file   (usually   /etc/ld.so.conf)   and   run    "ldconfig"
65   afterwards, or  else the  produced Exim  binary will  not be
66   able to find the library file.
67
68
69 2) Setting up BMI support in the Exim main configuration
70
71   To enable BMI  support in the  main Exim configuration,  you
72   should set the path to the main BMI configuration file  with
73   the "bmi_config_file" option, like this:
74
75   bmi_config_file = /opt/brightmail/etc/brightmail.cfg
76
77   This must go into section 1 of Exim's configuration file (You
78   can  put it  right on  top). If  you omit  this option,  it
79   defaults to /opt/brightmail/etc/brightmail.cfg.
80
81   Note for BMI6.x users: This  file is in XML format  in V6.xx
82   and its  name is  /opt/brightmail/etc/bmiconfig.xml. So  BMI
83   6.x users MUST set the bmi_config_file option.
84
85
86 3) Set up ACL control statement
87
88   To  optimize performance,  it makes  sense only  to process
89   messages coming from remote, untrusted sources with the  BMI
90   server.  To set  up a  messages for  processing by  the BMI
91   server, you MUST set the "bmi_run" control statement in  any
92   ACL for an incoming message.  You will typically do this  in
93   an "accept"  block in  the "acl_check_rcpt"  ACL. You should
94   use the "accept" block(s)  that accept messages from  remote
95   servers for your own domain(s). Here is an example that uses
96   the "accept" blocks from Exim's default configuration file:
97
98
99   accept  domains       = +local_domains
100           endpass
101           verify        = recipient
102           control       = bmi_run
103
104   accept  domains       = +relay_to_domains
105           endpass
106           verify        = recipient
107           control       = bmi_run
108
109   If bmi_run  is not  set in  any ACL  during reception of the
110   message, it will NOT be passed to the BMI server.
111
112
113 4) Setting up routers to use BMI verdicts
114
115   When a message has been  run through the BMI server,  one or
116   more "verdicts" are  present. Different recipients  can have
117   different verdicts. Each  recipient is treated  individually
118   during routing, so you  can query the verdicts  by recipient
119   at  that stage.  From Exim's  view, a  verdict can  have the
120   following outcomes:
121
122   o deliver the message normally
123   o deliver the message to an alternate location
124   o do not deliver the message
125
126   To query  the verdict  for a  recipient, the  implementation
127   offers the following tools:
128
129
130   - Boolean router  preconditions. These  can be  used in  any
131     router. For a simple  implementation of BMI, these  may be
132     all  that  you  need.  The  following  preconditions   are
133     available:
134
135     o bmi_deliver_default
136
137       This  precondition  is  TRUE  if  the  verdict  for  the
138       recipient is  to deliver  the message  normally. If  the
139       message has not been  processed by the BMI  server, this
140       variable defaults to TRUE.
141
142     o bmi_deliver_alternate
143
144       This  precondition  is  TRUE  if  the  verdict  for  the
145       recipient  is to  deliver the  message to  an alternate
146       location.  You  can  get the  location  string  from the
147       $bmi_alt_location expansion variable if you need it. See
148       further below. If the message has not been processed  by
149       the BMI server, this variable defaults to FALSE.
150
151     o bmi_dont_deliver
152
153       This  precondition  is  TRUE  if  the  verdict  for  the
154       recipient  is  NOT  to   deliver  the  message  to   the
155       recipient. You will typically use this precondition in a
156       top-level blackhole router, like this:
157
158         # don't deliver messages handled by the BMI server
159         bmi_blackhole:
160           driver = redirect
161           bmi_dont_deliver
162           data = :blackhole:
163
164       This router should be on top of all others, so  messages
165       that should not be delivered do not reach other  routers
166       at all. If   the  message  has  not  been  processed  by
167       the  BMI server, this variable defaults to FALSE.
168
169
170   - A list router  precondition to query  if rules "fired"  on
171     the message for the recipient. Its name is "bmi_rule". You
172     use  it  by  passing it  a  colon-separated  list of  rule
173     numbers. You can use this condition to route messages that
174     matched specific rules. Here is an example:
175
176       # special router for BMI rule #5, #8 and #11
177       bmi_rule_redirect:
178         driver = redirect
179         bmi_rule = 5:8:11
180         data = postmaster@mydomain.com
181
182
183   - Expansion variables. Several  expansion variables are  set
184     during  routing.  You  can  use  them  in  custom   router
185     conditions,  for  example.  The  following  variables  are
186     available:
187
188     o $bmi_base64_verdict
189
190       This variable  will contain  the BASE64  encoded verdict
191       for the recipient being routed. You can use it to add  a
192       header to messages for tracking purposes, for example:
193
194       localuser:
195         driver = accept
196         check_local_user
197         headers_add = X-Brightmail-Verdict: $bmi_base64_verdict
198         transport = local_delivery
199
200       If there is no verdict available for the recipient being
201       routed, this variable contains the empty string.
202
203     o $bmi_base64_tracker_verdict
204
205       This variable  will contain  a BASE64  encoded subset of
206       the  verdict  information  concerning  the  "rules" that
207       fired  on the  message. You  can add  this string  to a
208       header, commonly named "X-Brightmail-Tracker". Example:
209
210       localuser:
211         driver = accept
212         check_local_user
213         headers_add = X-Brightmail-Tracker: $bmi_base64_tracker_verdict
214         transport = local_delivery
215
216       If there is no verdict available for the recipient being
217       routed, this variable contains the empty string.
218
219     o $bmi_alt_location
220
221       If  the  verdict  is  to  redirect  the  message  to  an
222       alternate  location,  this  variable  will  contain  the
223       alternate location string returned by the BMI server. In
224       its default configuration, this is a header-like  string
225       that can be added to the message with "headers_add".  If
226       there is  no verdict  available for  the recipient being
227       routed, or if the  message is to be  delivered normally,
228       this variable contains the empty string.
229
230     o $bmi_deliver
231
232       This is an additional integer variable that can be  used
233       to query if the message should be delivered at all.  You
234       should use router preconditions instead if possible.
235
236       $bmi_deliver is '0': the message should NOT be delivered.
237       $bmi_deliver is '1': the message should be delivered.
238
239
240   IMPORTANT NOTE: Verdict inheritance.
241   The  message  is passed  to  the BMI  server  during message
242   reception,  using the  target addresses  from the  RCPT TO:
243   commands in the SMTP transaction. If recipients get expanded
244   or re-written (for example by aliasing), the new address(es)
245   inherit the  verdict from  the original  address. This means
246   that verdicts also apply to all "child" addresses  generated
247   from top-level addresses that were sent to the BMI server.
248
249
250 5) Using per-recipient opt-in information (Optional)
251
252   The  BMI server  features multiple  scanning "profiles"  for
253   individual recipients.  These are  usually stored  in a LDAP
254   server and are  queried by the  BMI server itself.  However,
255   you can also  pass opt-in data  for each recipient  from the
256   MTA to the  BMI server. This  is particularly useful  if you
257   already look  up recipient  data in  Exim anyway  (which can
258   also be  stored in  a SQL  database or  other source).  This
259   implementation enables you  to pass opt-in  data to the  BMI
260   server  in  the  RCPT   ACL.  This  works  by   setting  the
261   'bmi_optin' modifier in  a block of  that ACL. If  should be
262   set to a list  of comma-separated strings that  identify the
263   features which the BMI server should use for that particular
264   recipient. Ideally, you  would use the  'bmi_optin' modifier
265   in the same  ACL block where  you set the  'bmi_run' control
266   flag. Here is an example that will pull opt-in data for each
267   recipient      from       a      flat       file      called
268   '/etc/exim/bmi_optin_data'.
269
270   The file format:
271
272     user1@mydomain.com: <OPTIN STRING1>:<OPTIN STRING2>
273     user2@thatdomain.com: <OPTIN STRING3>
274
275
276   The example:
277
278     accept  domains       = +relay_to_domains
279             endpass
280             verify        = recipient
281             bmi_optin     = ${lookup{$local_part@$domain}lsearch{/etc/exim/bmi_optin_data}}
282             control       = bmi_run
283
284   Of course,  you can  also use  any other  lookup method that
285   Exim supports, including LDAP, Postgres, MySQL, Oracle etc.,
286   as long as  the result is  a list of  colon-separated opt-in
287   strings.
288
289   For a list of available opt-in strings, please contact  your
290   Brightmail representative.
291
292
293
294
295 SRS (Sender Rewriting Scheme) Support (using libsrs_alt)
296 --------------------------------------------------------------
297 See also below, for an alternative native support implementation.
298
299 Exim  currently  includes SRS  support  via Miles  Wilton's
300 libsrs_alt library. The current version of the supported
301 library is 0.5, there are reports of 1.0 working.
302
303 In order to  use SRS, you  must get a  copy of libsrs_alt from
304
305 https://opsec.eu/src/srs/
306
307 (not the original source, which has disappeared.)
308
309 Unpack the tarball, then refer to MTAs/README.EXIM
310 to proceed. You need to set
311
312 EXPERIMENTAL_SRS=yes
313
314 in your Local/Makefile.
315
316 The following main-section options become available:
317         srs_config              string
318         srs_hashlength          int
319         srs_hashmin             int
320         srs_maxage              int
321         srs_secrets             string
322         srs_usehash             bool
323         srs_usetimestamp        bool
324
325 The redirect router gains these options (all of type string, unset by default):
326         srs
327         srs_alias
328         srs_condition
329         srs_dbinsert
330         srs_dbselect
331
332 The following variables become available:
333         $srs_db_address
334         $srs_db_key
335         $srs_orig_recipient
336         $srs_orig_sender
337         $srs_recipient
338         $srs_status
339
340 The predefined feature-macro _HAVE_SRS will be present.
341 Additional delivery log line elements, tagged with "SRS=" will show the srs sender.     
342 For configuration information see https://github.com/Exim/exim/wiki/SRS .
343
344
345
346
347 SRS (Sender Rewriting Scheme) Support (native)
348 --------------------------------------------------------------
349 This is less full-featured than the libsrs_alt version above.
350
351 The Exim build needs to be done with this in Local/Makefile:
352 EXPERIMENTAL_SRS_NATIVE=yes
353
354 The following are provided:
355 - an expansion item "srs_encode"
356   This takes three arguments:
357   - a site SRS secret
358   - the return_path
359   - the pre-forwarding domain
360
361 - an expansion condition "inbound_srs"
362   This takes two arguments: the local_part to check, and a site SRS secret.
363   If the secret is zero-length, only the pattern of the local_part is checked.
364   The $srs_recipient variable is set as a side-effect.
365
366 - an expansion variable $srs_recipient
367   This gets the original return_path encoded in the SRS'd local_part
368
369 - predefined macros _HAVE_SRS and _HAVE_NATIVE_SRS
370
371 Sample usage:
372
373   #macro
374   SRS_SECRET = <pick something unique for your site for this>
375   
376   #routers
377
378   outbound:
379     driver =    dnslookup
380     # if outbound, and forwarding has been done, use an alternate transport
381     domains =   ! +my_domains
382     transport = ${if eq {$local_part@$domain} \
383                         {$original_local_part@$original_domain} \
384                      {remote_smtp} {remote_forwarded_smtp}}
385   
386   inbound_srs:
387     driver =    redirect
388     senders =   :
389     domains =   +my_domains
390     # detect inbound bounces which are SRS'd, and decode them
391     condition = ${if inbound_srs {$local_part} {SRS_SECRET}}
392     data =      $srs_recipient
393   
394   inbound_srs_failure:
395     driver =    redirect
396     senders =   :
397     domains =   +my_domains
398     # detect inbound bounces which look SRS'd but are invalid
399     condition = ${if inbound_srs {$local_part} {}}
400     allow_fail
401     data =      :fail: Invalid SRS recipient address
402
403   #... further routers here
404
405   
406   # transport; should look like the non-forward outbound
407   # one, plus the max_rcpt and return_path options
408   remote_forwarded_smtp:
409     driver =              smtp
410     # modify the envelope from, for mails that we forward
411     max_rcpt =            1
412     return_path =         ${srs_encode {SRS_SECRET} {$return_path} {$original_domain}}
413
414
415
416
417 DCC Support
418 --------------------------------------------------------------
419 Distributed Checksum Clearinghouse; http://www.rhyolite.com/dcc/
420
421 *) Building exim
422
423 In order to build exim with DCC support add
424
425 EXPERIMENTAL_DCC=yes
426
427 to your Makefile. (Re-)build/install exim. exim -d should show
428 EXPERIMENTAL_DCC under "Support for".
429
430
431 *) Configuration
432
433 In the main section of exim.cf add at least
434   dccifd_address = /usr/local/dcc/var/dccifd
435 or
436   dccifd_address = <ip> <port>
437
438 In the DATA ACL you can use the new condition
439         dcc = *
440
441 After that "$dcc_header" contains the X-DCC-Header.
442
443 Return values are:
444   fail    for overall "R", "G" from dccifd
445   defer   for overall "T" from dccifd
446   accept  for overall "A", "S" from dccifd
447
448 dcc = */defer_ok works as for spamd.
449
450 The "$dcc_result" variable contains the overall result from DCC
451 answer.  There will an X-DCC: header added to the mail.
452
453 Usually you'll use
454   defer   !dcc = *
455 to greylist with DCC.
456
457 If you set, in the main section,
458   dcc_direct_add_header = true
459 then the dcc header will be added "in deep" and if the spool
460 file was already written it gets removed. This forces Exim to
461 write it again if needed.  This helps to get the DCC Header
462 through to eg. SpamAssassin.
463
464 If you want to pass even more headers in the middle of the
465 DATA stage you can set
466   $acl_m_dcc_add_header
467 to tell the DCC routines to add more information; eg, you might set
468 this to some results from ClamAV.  Be careful.  Header syntax is
469 not checked and is added "as is".
470
471 In case you've troubles with sites sending the same queue items from several
472 hosts and fail to get through greylisting you can use
473 $acl_m_dcc_override_client_ip
474
475 Setting $acl_m_dcc_override_client_ip to an IP address overrides the default
476 of $sender_host_address. eg. use the following ACL in DATA stage:
477
478   warn    set acl_m_dcc_override_client_ip = \
479     ${lookup{$sender_helo_name}nwildlsearch{/etc/mail/multipleip_sites}{$value}{}}
480           condition = ${if def:acl_m_dcc_override_client_ip}
481           log_message = dbg: acl_m_dcc_override_client_ip set to \
482                         $acl_m_dcc_override_client_ip
483
484 Then set something like
485 # cat /etc/mail/multipleip_sites
486 mout-xforward.gmx.net           82.165.159.12
487 mout.gmx.net                    212.227.15.16
488
489 Use a reasonable IP. eg. one the sending cluster actually uses.
490
491
492
493 DSN extra information
494 ---------------------
495 If compiled with EXPERIMENTAL_DSN_INFO extra information will be added
496 to DSN fail messages ("bounces"), when available.  The intent is to aid
497 tracing of specific failing messages, when presented with a "bounce"
498 complaint and needing to search logs.
499
500
501 The remote MTA IP address, with port number if nonstandard.
502 Example:
503   Remote-MTA: X-ip; [127.0.0.1]:587
504 Rationale:
505   Several addresses may correspond to the (already available)
506   dns name for the remote MTA.
507
508 The remote MTA connect-time greeting.
509 Example:
510   X-Remote-MTA-smtp-greeting: X-str; 220 the.local.host.name ESMTP Exim x.yz Tue, 2 Mar 1999 09:44:33 +0000
511 Rationale:
512   This string sometimes presents the remote MTA's idea of its
513   own name, and sometimes identifies the MTA software.
514
515 The remote MTA response to HELO or EHLO.
516 Example:
517   X-Remote-MTA-helo-response: X-str; 250-the.local.host.name Hello localhost [127.0.0.1]
518 Limitations:
519   Only the first line of a multiline response is recorded.
520 Rationale:
521   This string sometimes presents the remote MTA's view of
522   the peer IP connecting to it.
523
524 The reporting MTA detailed diagnostic.
525 Example:
526   X-Exim-Diagnostic: X-str; SMTP error from remote mail server after RCPT TO:<d3@myhost.test.ex>: 550 hard error
527 Rationale:
528   This string sometimes give extra information over the
529   existing (already available) Diagnostic-Code field.
530
531
532 Note that non-RFC-documented field names and data types are used.
533
534
535 LMDB Lookup support
536 -------------------
537 LMDB is an ultra-fast, ultra-compact, crash-proof key-value embedded data store.
538 It is modeled loosely on the BerkeleyDB API. You should read about the feature
539 set as well as operation modes at https://symas.com/products/lightning-memory-mapped-database/
540
541 LMDB single key lookup support is provided by linking to the LMDB C library.
542 The current implementation does not support writing to the LMDB database.
543
544 Visit https://github.com/LMDB/lmdb to download the library or find it in your
545 operating systems package repository.
546
547 If building from source, this description assumes that headers will be in
548 /usr/local/include, and that the libraries are in /usr/local/lib.
549
550 1. In order to build exim with LMDB lookup support add or uncomment
551
552 EXPERIMENTAL_LMDB=yes
553
554 to your Local/Makefile. (Re-)build/install exim. exim -d should show
555 Experimental_LMDB in the line "Support for:".
556
557 EXPERIMENTAL_LMDB=yes
558 LDFLAGS += -llmdb
559 # CFLAGS += -I/usr/local/include
560 # LDFLAGS += -L/usr/local/lib
561
562 The first line sets the feature to include the correct code, and
563 the second line says to link the LMDB libraries into the
564 exim binary.  The commented out lines should be uncommented if you
565 built LMDB from source and installed in the default location.
566 Adjust the paths if you installed them elsewhere, but you do not
567 need to uncomment them if an rpm (or you) installed them in the
568 package controlled locations (/usr/include and /usr/lib).
569
570 2. Create your LMDB files, you can use the mdb_load utility which is
571 part of the LMDB distribution our your favourite language bindings.
572
573 3. Add the single key lookups to your exim.conf file, example lookups
574 are below.
575
576 ${lookup{$sender_address_domain}lmdb{/var/lib/baruwa/data/db/relaydomains.mdb}{$value}}
577 ${lookup{$sender_address_domain}lmdb{/var/lib/baruwa/data/db/relaydomains.mdb}{$value}fail}
578 ${lookup{$sender_address_domain}lmdb{/var/lib/baruwa/data/db/relaydomains.mdb}}
579
580
581 Queuefile transport
582 -------------------
583 Queuefile is a pseudo transport which does not perform final delivery.
584 It simply copies the exim spool files out of the spool directory into
585 an external directory retaining the exim spool format.
586
587 The spool files can then be processed by external processes and then
588 requeued into exim spool directories for final delivery.
589 However, note carefully the warnings in the main documentation on
590 qpool file formats.
591
592 The motivation/inspiration for the transport is to allow external
593 processes to access email queued by exim and have access to all the
594 information which would not be available if the messages were delivered
595 to the process in the standard email formats.
596
597 The mailscanner package is one of the processes that can take advantage
598 of this transport to filter email.
599
600 The transport can be used in the same way as the other existing transports,
601 i.e by configuring a router to route mail to a transport configured with
602 the queuefile driver.
603
604 The transport only takes one option:
605
606 * directory - This is used to specify the directory messages should be
607 copied to.  Expanded.
608
609 The generic transport options (body_only, current_directory, disable_logging,
610 debug_print, delivery_date_add, envelope_to_add, event_action, group,
611 headers_add, headers_only, headers_remove, headers_rewrite, home_directory,
612 initgroups, max_parallel, message_size_limit, rcpt_include_affixes,
613 retry_use_local_part, return_path, return_path_add, shadow_condition,
614 shadow_transport, transport_filter, transport_filter_timeout, user) are
615 ignored.
616
617 Sample configuration:
618
619 (Router)
620
621 scan:
622    driver = accept
623    transport = scan
624
625 (Transport)
626
627 scan:
628   driver = queuefile
629   directory = /var/spool/baruwa-scanner/input
630
631
632 In order to build exim with Queuefile transport support add or uncomment
633
634 EXPERIMENTAL_QUEUEFILE=yes
635
636 to your Local/Makefile. (Re-)build/install exim. exim -d should show
637 Experimental_QUEUEFILE in the line "Support for:".
638
639
640 ARC support
641 -----------
642 Specification: https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-dmarc-arc-protocol-11
643 Note that this is not an RFC yet, so may change.
644
645 [RFC 8617 was published 2019/06.  Draft 11 was 2018/01.  A review of the
646 changes has not yet been done]
647
648 ARC is intended to support the utility of SPF and DKIM in the presence of
649 intermediaries in the transmission path - forwarders and mailinglists -
650 by establishing a cryptographically-signed chain in headers.
651
652 Normally one would only bother doing ARC-signing when functioning as
653 an intermediary.  One might do verify for local destinations.
654
655 ARC uses the notion of a "ADministrative Management Domain" (ADMD).
656 Described in RFC 5598 (section 2.3), this is essentially a set of
657 mail-handling systems that mail transits that are all under the control
658 of one organisation.  A label should be chosen to identify the ADMD.
659 Messages should be ARC-verified on entry to the ADMD, and ARC-signed on exit
660 from it.
661
662
663 Building with ARC Support
664 --
665 Enable using EXPERIMENTAL_ARC=yes in your Local/Makefile.
666 You must also have DKIM present (not disabled), and you very likely
667 want to have SPF enabled.
668
669
670 Verification
671 --
672 An ACL condition is provided to perform the "verifier actions" detailed
673 in section 6 of the above specification.  It may be called from the DATA ACL
674 and succeeds if the result matches any of a given list.
675 It also records the highest ARC instance number (the chain size)
676 and verification result for later use in creating an Authentication-Results:
677 standard header.
678
679   verify = arc/<acceptable_list>   none:fail:pass
680
681   add_header = :at_start:${authresults {<admd-identifier>}}
682
683         Note that it would be wise to strip incoming messages of A-R headers
684         that claim to be from our own <admd-identifier>.
685
686 There are four new variables:
687
688   $arc_state            One of pass, fail, none
689   $arc_state_reason     (if fail, why)
690   $arc_domains          colon-sep list of ARC chain domains, in chain order.
691                         problematic elements may have empty list elements
692   $arc_oldest_pass      lowest passing instance number of chain
693
694 Example:
695   logwrite = oldest-p-ams: <${reduce {$lh_ARC-Authentication-Results:} \
696                                 {} \
697                                 {${if = {$arc_oldest_pass} \
698                                         {${extract {i}{${extract {1}{;}{$item}}}}} \
699                                         {$item} {$value}}} \
700                             }>
701
702 Receive log lines for an ARC pass will be tagged "ARC".
703
704
705 Signing
706 --
707 arc_sign = <admd-identifier> : <selector> : <privkey> [ : <options> ]
708 An option on the smtp transport, which constructs and prepends to the message
709 an ARC set of headers.  The textually-first Authentication-Results: header
710 is used as a basis (you must have added one on entry to the ADMD).
711 Expanded as a whole; if unset, empty or forced-failure then no signing is done.
712 If it is set, all of the first three elements must be non-empty.
713
714 The fourth element is optional, and if present consists of a comma-separated list
715 of options.  The options implemented are
716
717   timestamps            Add a t= tag to the generated AMS and AS headers, with the
718                         current time.
719   expire[=<val>]        Add an x= tag to the generated AMS header, with an expiry time.
720                         If the value <val> is an plain number it is used unchanged.
721                         If it starts with a '+' then the following number is added
722                         to the current time, as an offset in seconds.
723                         If a value is not given it defaults to a one month offset.
724
725 [As of writing, gmail insist that a t= tag on the AS is mandatory]
726
727 Caveats:
728  * There must be an Authentication-Results header, presumably added by an ACL
729    while receiving the message, for the same ADMD, for arc_sign to succeed.
730    This requires careful coordination between inbound and outbound logic.
731
732    Only one A-R header is taken account of.  This is a limitation versus
733    the ARC spec (which says that all A-R headers from within the ADMD must
734    be used).
735
736  * If passing a message to another system, such as a mailing-list manager
737    (MLM), between receipt and sending, be wary of manipulations to headers made
738    by the MLM.
739    + For instance, Mailman with REMOVE_DKIM_HEADERS==3 might improve
740      deliverability in a pre-ARC world, but that option also renames the
741      Authentication-Results header, which breaks signing.
742
743  * Even if you use multiple DKIM keys for different domains, the ARC concept
744    should try to stick to one ADMD, so pick a primary domain and use that for
745    AR headers and outbound signing.
746
747 Signing is not compatible with cutthrough delivery; any (before expansion)
748 value set for the option will result in cutthrough delivery not being
749 used via the transport in question.
750
751
752
753
754 TLS Session Resumption
755 ----------------------
756 TLS Session Resumption for TLS 1.2 and TLS 1.3 connections can be used (defined
757 in RFC 5077 for 1.2).  The support for this can be included by building with
758 EXPERIMENTAL_TLS_RESUME defined.  This requires GnuTLS 3.6.3 or OpenSSL 1.1.1
759 (or later).
760
761 Session resumption (this is the "stateless" variant) involves the server sending
762 a "session ticket" to the client on one connection, which can be stored by the
763 client and used for a later session.  The ticket contains sufficient state for
764 the server to reconstruct the TLS session, avoiding some expensive crypto
765 calculation and one full packet roundtrip time.
766
767 Operational cost/benefit:
768  The extra data being transmitted costs a minor amount, and the client has
769  extra costs in storing and retrieving the data.
770
771  In the Exim/Gnutls implementation the extra cost on an initial connection
772  which is TLS1.2 over a loopback path is about 6ms on 2017-laptop class hardware.
773  The saved cost on a subsequent connection is about 4ms; three or more
774  connections become a net win.  On longer network paths, two or more
775  connections will have an average lower startup time thanks to the one
776  saved packet roundtrip.  TLS1.3 will save the crypto cpu costs but not any
777  packet roundtrips.
778
779  Since a new hints DB is used, the hints DB maintenance should be updated
780  to additionally handle "tls".
781
782 Security aspects:
783  The session ticket is encrypted, but is obviously an additional security
784  vulnarability surface.  An attacker able to decrypt it would have access
785  all connections using the resumed session.
786  The session ticket encryption key is not committed to storage by the server
787  and is rotated regularly (OpenSSL: 1hr, and one previous key is used for
788  overlap; GnuTLS 6hr but does not specify any overlap).
789  Tickets have limited lifetime (2hr, and new ones issued after 1hr under
790  OpenSSL.  GnuTLS 2hr, appears to not do overlap).
791
792  There is a question-mark over the security of the Diffie-Helman parameters
793  used for session negotiation. TBD.  q-value; cf bug 1895
794
795 Observability:
796  New log_selector "tls_resumption", appends an asterisk to the tls_cipher "X="
797  element.
798
799  Variables $tls_{in,out}_resumption have bits 0-4 indicating respectively
800  support built, client requested ticket, client offered session,
801  server issued ticket, resume used.  A suitable decode list is provided
802  in the builtin macro _RESUME_DECODE for ${listextract {}{}}.
803
804 Issues:
805  In a resumed session:
806   $tls_{in,out}_cipher will have values different to the original (under GnuTLS)
807   $tls_{in,out}_ocsp will be "not requested" or "no response", and
808    hosts_require_ocsp will fail
809
810
811
812 Dovecot authenticator via inet socket
813 ------------------------------------
814 If Dovecot is configured similar to :-
815
816 service auth {
817 ...
818 #SASL
819   inet_listener {
820     name = exim
821     port = 12345
822   }
823 ...
824 }
825
826 then an Exim authenticator can be configured :-
827
828   dovecot-plain:
829     driver =            dovecot
830     public_name =       PLAIN
831     server_socket =     dovecot_server_name 12345
832     server_tls =        true
833     server_set_id =     $auth1
834
835 If the server_socket does not start with a / it is taken as a hostname (or IP);
836 and a whitespace-separated port number must be given.
837
838
839
840 Twophase queue run fast ramp
841 ----------------------------
842 To include this feature, add to Local/Makefile:
843   EXPERIMENTAL_QUEUE_RAMP=yes
844
845 If the (added for this feature) main-section option "queue_fast_ramp" (boolean)
846 is set, and a two-phase ("-qq") queue run finds, during the first phase, a
847 suitably large number of message routed for a given host - then (subject to
848 the usual queue-runner resource limits) delivery for that host is initiated
849 immediately, overlapping with the remainder of the first phase.
850
851 This is incompatible with queue_run_in_order.
852
853 The result should be a faster startup of deliveries when a large queue is
854 present and reasonable numbers of messages are routed to common hosts; this
855 could be a smarthost case, or delivery onto the Internet where a large proportion
856 of recipients hapen to be on a Gorilla-sized provider.
857
858 As usual, the presence of a configuration option is associated with a
859 predefined macro, making it possible to write portable configurations.
860 For this one, the macro is _OPT_MAIN_QUEUE_FAST_RAMP.
861
862
863
864 --------------------------------------------------------------
865 End of file
866 --------------------------------------------------------------