Add missing feature lines to prototype Makefile
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1##################################################
2# The Exim mail transport agent #
3##################################################
4
5# This is the template for Exim's main build-time configuration file. It
6# contains settings that are independent of any operating system. These are
7# things that are mostly sysadmin choices. The items below are divided into
8# those you must specify, those you probably want to specify, those you might
9# often want to specify, and those that you almost never need to mention.
10
11# Edit this file and save the result to a file called Local/Makefile within the
12# Exim distribution directory before running the "make" command.
13
14# Things that depend on the operating system have default settings in
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15# OS/Makefile-Default, but these are overridden for some OS by files
16# called called OS/Makefile-<osname>. You can further override these by
17# creating files called Local/Makefile-<osname>, and
18# Local/Makefile-<buildname> (where "<osname>" stands for the name of
19# your operating system - look at the names in the OS directory to see
20# which names are recognized, and "<buildname>" is derived from the
21# environment variable "build")
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22
23# However, if you are building Exim for a single OS only, you don't need to
24# worry about setting up Local/Makefile-<osname>. Any build-time configuration
25# settings you require can in fact be placed in the one file called
26# Local/Makefile. It is only if you are building for several OS from the same
27# source files that you need to worry about splitting off your own OS-dependent
28# settings into separate files. (There's more explanation about how this all
29# works in the toplevel README file, under "Modifying the building process", as
30# well as in the Exim specification.)
31
32# One OS-specific thing that may need to be changed is the command for running
33# the C compiler; the overall default is gcc, but some OS Makefiles specify cc.
34# You can override anything that is set by putting CC=whatever in your
35# Local/Makefile.
36
37# NOTE: You should never need to edit any of the distributed Makefiles; all
38# overriding can be done in your Local/Makefile(s). This will make it easier
39# for you when the next release comes along.
40
41# The location of the X11 libraries is something else that is quite variable
42# even between different versions of the same operating system (and indeed
43# there are different versions of X11 as well, of course). The four settings
44# concerned here are X11, XINCLUDE, XLFLAGS (linking flags) and X11_LD_LIB
45# (dynamic run-time library). You need not worry about X11 unless you want to
46# compile the Exim monitor utility. Exim itself does not use X11.
47
48# Another area of variability between systems is the type and location of the
49# DBM library package. Exim has support for ndbm, gdbm, tdb, and Berkeley DB.
50# By default the code assumes ndbm; this often works with gdbm or DB, provided
51# they are correctly installed, via their compatibility interfaces. However,
52# Exim can also be configured to use the native calls for Berkeley DB (obsolete
53# versions 1.85, 2.x, 3.x, or the current 4.x version) and also for gdbm.
54
55# For some operating systems, a default DBM library (other than ndbm) is
56# selected by a setting in the OS-specific Makefile. Most modern OS now have
57# a DBM library installed as standard, and in many cases this will be selected
58# for you by the OS-specific configuration. If Exim compiles without any
59# problems, you probably do not have to worry about the DBM library. If you
60# do want or need to change it, you should first read the discussion in the
61# file doc/dbm.discuss.txt, which also contains instructions for testing Exim's
62# interface to the DBM library.
63
64# In Local/Makefiles blank lines and lines starting with # are ignored. It is
65# also permitted to use the # character to add a comment to a setting, for
66# example
67#
68# EXIM_GID=42 # the "mail" group
69#
70# However, with some versions of "make" this works only if there is no white
71# space between the end of the setting and the #, so perhaps it is best
72# avoided. A consequence of this facility is that it is not possible to have
73# the # character present in any setting, but I can't think of any cases where
74# this would be wanted.
75###############################################################################
76
77
78
79###############################################################################
80# THESE ARE THINGS YOU MUST SPECIFY #
81###############################################################################
82
83# Exim will not build unless you specify BIN_DIRECTORY, CONFIGURE_FILE, and
84# EXIM_USER. You also need EXIM_GROUP if EXIM_USER specifies a uid by number.
85
86# If you don't specify SPOOL_DIRECTORY, Exim won't fail to build. However, it
87# really is a very good idea to specify it here rather than at run time. This
88# is particularly true if you let the logs go to their default location in the
89# spool directory, because it means that the location of the logs is known
90# before Exim has read the run time configuration file.
91
92#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
93# BIN_DIRECTORY defines where the exim binary will be installed by "make
94# install". The path is also used internally by Exim when it needs to re-invoke
95# itself, either to send an error message, or to recover root privilege. Exim's
96# utility binaries and scripts are also installed in this directory. There is
97# no "standard" place for the binary directory. Some people like to keep all
98# the Exim files under one directory such as /usr/exim; others just let the
99# Exim binaries go into an existing directory such as /usr/sbin or
100# /usr/local/sbin. The installation script will try to create this directory,
101# and any superior directories, if they do not exist.
102
103BIN_DIRECTORY=/usr/exim/bin
104
105
106#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
107# CONFIGURE_FILE defines where Exim's run time configuration file is to be
108# found. It is the complete pathname for the file, not just a directory. The
109# location of all other run time files and directories can be changed in the
110# run time configuration file. There is a lot of variety in the choice of
111# location in different OS, and in the preferences of different sysadmins. Some
112# common locations are in /etc or /etc/mail or /usr/local/etc or
113# /usr/local/etc/mail. Another possibility is to keep all the Exim files under
114# a single directory such as /usr/exim. Whatever you choose, the installation
115# script will try to make the directory and any superior directories if they
116# don't exist. It will also install a default runtime configuration if this
117# file does not exist.
118
119CONFIGURE_FILE=/usr/exim/configure
120
121# It is possible to specify a colon-separated list of files for CONFIGURE_FILE.
122# In this case, Exim will use the first of them that exists when it is run.
123# However, if a list is specified, the installation script no longer tries to
124# make superior directories or to install a default runtime configuration.
125
126
127#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
128# The Exim binary must normally be setuid root, so that it starts executing as
129# root, but (depending on the options with which it is called) it does not
130# always need to retain the root privilege. These settings define the user and
131# group that is used for Exim processes when they no longer need to be root. In
132# particular, this applies when receiving messages and when doing remote
133# deliveries. (Local deliveries run as various non-root users, typically as the
10385c15 134# owner of a local mailbox.) Specifying these values as root is not supported.
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135
136EXIM_USER=
137
138# If you specify EXIM_USER as a name, this is looked up at build time, and the
139# uid number is built into the binary. However, you can specify that this
140# lookup is deferred until runtime. In this case, it is the name that is built
141# into the binary. You can do this by a setting of the form:
142
143# EXIM_USER=ref:exim
144
145# In other words, put "ref:" in front of the user name. If you set EXIM_USER
146# like this, any value specified for EXIM_GROUP is also passed "by reference".
147# Although this costs a bit of resource at runtime, it is convenient to use
148# this feature when building binaries that are to be run on multiple systems
149# where the name may refer to different uids. It also allows you to build Exim
150# on a system where there is no Exim user defined.
151
152# If the setting of EXIM_USER is numeric (e.g. EXIM_USER=42), there must
153# also be a setting of EXIM_GROUP. If, on the other hand, you use a name
154# for EXIM_USER (e.g. EXIM_USER=exim), you don't need to set EXIM_GROUP unless
155# you want to use a group other than the default group for the given user.
156
157# EXIM_GROUP=
158
159# Many sites define a user called "exim", with an appropriate default group,
160# and use
161#
162# EXIM_USER=exim
163#
164# while leaving EXIM_GROUP unspecified (commented out).
165
166
167#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
168# SPOOL_DIRECTORY defines the directory where all the data for messages in
169# transit is kept. It is strongly recommended that you define it here, though
170# it is possible to leave this till the run time configuration.
171
172# Exim creates the spool directory if it does not exist. The owner and group
173# will be those defined by EXIM_USER and EXIM_GROUP, and this also applies to
174# all the files and directories that are created in the spool directory.
175
176# Almost all installations choose this:
177
178SPOOL_DIRECTORY=/var/spool/exim
179
180
181
182###############################################################################
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183# TLS #
184###############################################################################
185# Exim is built by default to support the SMTP STARTTLS command, which implements
186# Transport Layer Security using SSL (Secure Sockets Layer). This requires you
187# must install the OpenSSL library package or the GnuTLS library. Exim contains
188# no cryptographic code of its own.
189
190# If you are running Exim as a (TLS) server, just building it with TLS support
191# is all you need to do, as tls_advertise_hosts is set to '*' by
192# default. But you are advised to create a suiteable certificate, and tell
193# Exim about it by means of the tls_certificate and tls_privatekey run
194# time options, otherwise Exim will create a self signed certificate on
195# the fly. If you are running Exim only as a (TLS) client, building it with
196# TLS support is all you need to do.
197#
198# If you are using pkg-config then you should not need to worry where
199# the libraries and headers are installed, as the pkg-config .pc
200# specification should include all -L/-I information necessary.
201# Enabling the USE_*_PC options should be sufficient. If not using
202# pkg-config, then you have to specify the libraries, and you mmight
203# need to specify the locations too.
204
de517fd3 205# Uncomment the following lines if you want
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206# to build Exim without any TLS support (either OpenSSL or GnuTLS):
207# DISABLE_TLS=yes
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208# Unless you do this, you must define one of USE_OPENSSL or USE_GNUTLS
209# below.
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210
211# If you are buliding with TLS, the library configuration must be done:
212
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213# Uncomment this if you are using OpenSSL
214# USE_OPENSSL=yes
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215# Uncomment one of these settings if you are using OpenSSL; pkg-config vs not
216# and an optional location.
217# USE_OPENSSL_PC=openssl
218# TLS_LIBS=-lssl -lcrypto
219# TLS_LIBS=-L/usr/local/openssl/lib -lssl -lcrypto
220
221# Uncomment this if you are using GnuTLS
222# USE_GNUTLS=yes
223# Uncomment one of these settings if you are using GnuTLS; pkg-config vs not
224# and an optional location. If you disable SUPPORT_DANE below, you
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225# can remove the gnutls-dane references here. Earlier versions of GnuTLS
226# required libtasn1 and libgrypt also; add if needed.
01603eec 227# USE_GNUTLS_PC=gnutls gnutls-dane
84539f73 228# TLS_LIBS=-lgnutls -lgnutls-dane
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229# TLS_LIBS=-L/usr/local/gnu/lib -lgnutls -ltasn1 -lgcrypt -lgnutls-dane
230
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231# If using GnuTLS older than 2.10 and using pkg-config then note that Exim's
232# build process will require libgcrypt-config to exist in your $PATH. A
233# version that old is likely to become unsupported by Exim in 2017.
234
235# The security fix we provide with the gnutls_allow_auto_pkcs11 option
236# (4.82 PP/09) introduces a compatibility regression. The symbol is
237# not available if GnuTLS is build without p11-kit (--without-p11-kit
238# configure option). In this case use AVOID_GNUTLS_PKCS11=yes when
239# building Exim.
240# AVOID_GNUTLS_PKCS11=yes
241
242# If you are running Exim as a server, note that just building it with TLS
243# support is not all you need to do. You also need to set up a suitable
244# certificate, and tell Exim about it by means of the tls_certificate
245# and tls_privatekey run time options. You also need to set tls_advertise_hosts
246# to specify the hosts to which Exim advertises TLS support. On the other hand,
247# if you are running Exim only as a client, building it with TLS support
248# is all you need to do.
249
250# If you are using pkg-config then you should not need to worry where the
251# libraries and headers are installed, as the pkg-config .pc specification
252# should include all -L/-I information necessary. If not using pkg-config
253# then you might need to specify the locations too.
254
255# Additional libraries and include files are required for both OpenSSL and
256# GnuTLS. The TLS_LIBS settings above assume that the libraries are installed
257# with all your other libraries. If they are in a special directory, you may
258# need something like
259
260# TLS_LIBS=-L/usr/local/openssl/lib -lssl -lcrypto
261
262# or
263
264# TLS_LIBS=-L/opt/gnu/lib -lgnutls -ltasn1 -lgcrypt -lgnutls-dane
265# If not using DANE under GnuTLS we can lose one library
266# TLS_LIBS=-L/opt/gnu/lib -lgnutls -ltasn1 -lgcrypt
267
268# TLS_LIBS is included only on the command for linking Exim itself, not on any
269# auxiliary programs. If the include files are not in a standard place, you can
270# set TLS_INCLUDE to specify where they are, for example:
271
272# TLS_INCLUDE=-I/usr/local/openssl/include/
273# or
274# TLS_INCLUDE=-I/opt/gnu/include
275
276# You don't need to set TLS_INCLUDE if the relevant directories are already
277# specified in INCLUDE.
278
279
280
281###############################################################################
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282# THESE ARE THINGS YOU PROBABLY WANT TO SPECIFY #
283###############################################################################
284
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285# If you need extra header file search paths on all compiles, put the -I
286# options in INCLUDE. If you want the extra searches only for certain
287# parts of the build, see more specific xxx_INCLUDE variables below.
288
289# INCLUDE=-I/example/include
290
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291# You need to specify some routers and transports if you want the Exim that you
292# are building to be capable of delivering mail. You almost certainly need at
293# least one type of lookup. You should consider whether you want to build
294# the Exim monitor or not.
295
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296# If you need to override how pkg-config finds configuration files for
297# installed software, then you can set that here; wildcards will be expanded.
298
299# PKG_CONFIG_PATH=/usr/local/opt/openssl/lib/pkgconfig : /opt/*/lib/pkgconfig
300
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301
302#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
303# These settings determine which individual router drivers are included in the
304# Exim binary. There are no defaults in the code; those routers that are wanted
305# must be defined here by setting the appropriate variables to the value "yes".
306# Including a router in the binary does not cause it to be used automatically.
307# It has also to be configured in the run time configuration file. By
308# commenting out those you know you don't want to use, you can make the binary
309# a bit smaller. If you are unsure, leave all of these included for now.
310
311ROUTER_ACCEPT=yes
312ROUTER_DNSLOOKUP=yes
313ROUTER_IPLITERAL=yes
314ROUTER_MANUALROUTE=yes
315ROUTER_QUERYPROGRAM=yes
316ROUTER_REDIRECT=yes
317
318# This one is very special-purpose, so is not included by default.
319
320# ROUTER_IPLOOKUP=yes
321
322
323#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
324# These settings determine which individual transport drivers are included in
325# the Exim binary. There are no defaults; those transports that are wanted must
326# be defined here by setting the appropriate variables to the value "yes".
327# Including a transport in the binary does not cause it to be used
328# automatically. It has also to be configured in the run time configuration
329# file. By commenting out those you know you don't want to use, you can make
330# the binary a bit smaller. If you are unsure, leave all of these included for
331# now.
332
333TRANSPORT_APPENDFILE=yes
334TRANSPORT_AUTOREPLY=yes
335TRANSPORT_PIPE=yes
336TRANSPORT_SMTP=yes
337
338# This one is special-purpose, and commonly not required, so it is not
339# included by default.
340
341# TRANSPORT_LMTP=yes
342
343
344#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
345# The appendfile transport can write messages to local mailboxes in a number
346# of formats. The code for three specialist formats, maildir, mailstore, and
347# MBX, is included only when requested. If you do not know what this is about,
348# leave these settings commented out.
349
350# SUPPORT_MAILDIR=yes
351# SUPPORT_MAILSTORE=yes
352# SUPPORT_MBX=yes
353
354
355#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
e6d225ae 356# See below for dynamic lookup modules.
8829633f 357#
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358# If not using package management but using this anyway, then think about how
359# you perform upgrades and revert them. You should consider the benefit of
360# embedding the Exim version number into LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR, so that you can
361# maintain two concurrent sets of modules.
31beb797 362#
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363# *BEWARE*: ability to modify the files in LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR is equivalent to
364# the ability to modify the Exim binary, which is often setuid root! The Exim
365# developers only intend this functionality be used by OS software packagers
366# and we suggest that such packagings' integrity checks should be paranoid
367# about the permissions of the directory and the files within.
368
369# LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR=/usr/lib/exim/lookups/
e6d225ae 370
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371# To build a module dynamically, you'll need to define CFLAGS_DYNAMIC for
372# your platform. Eg:
373# CFLAGS_DYNAMIC=-shared -rdynamic
374# CFLAGS_DYNAMIC=-shared -rdynamic -fPIC
375
e6d225ae 376#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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377# These settings determine which file and database lookup methods are included
378# in the binary. See the manual chapter entitled "File and database lookups"
379# for discussion. DBM and lsearch (linear search) are included by default. If
380# you are unsure about the others, leave them commented out for now.
381# LOOKUP_DNSDB does *not* refer to general mail routing using the DNS. It is
382# for the specialist case of using the DNS as a general database facility (not
383# common).
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384# If set to "2" instead of "yes" then the corresponding lookup will be
385# built as a module and must be installed into LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR. You need to
386# add -export-dynamic -rdynamic to EXTRALIBS. You may also need to add -ldl to
387# EXTRALIBS so that dlopen() is available to Exim. You need to define
388# LOOKUP_MODULE_DIR above so the exim binary actually loads dynamic lookup
389# modules.
390# Also, instead of adding all the libraries/includes to LOOKUP_INCLUDE and
391# LOOKUP_LIBS, add them to the respective LOOKUP_*_INCLUDE and LOOKUP_*_LIBS
392# (where * is the name as given here in this list). That ensures that only
393# the dynamic library and not the exim binary will be linked against the
394# library.
395# NOTE: LDAP cannot be built as a module!
f4b00a2d 396#
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397# For Redis you need to have hiredis installed on your system
398# (https://github.com/redis/hiredis).
399# Depending on where it is installed you may have to edit the CFLAGS
400# (often += -I/usr/local/include) and LDFLAGS (-lhiredis) lines.
401
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402# If your system has pkg-config then the _INCLUDE/_LIBS setting can be
403# handled for you automatically by also defining the _PC variable to reference
404# the name of the pkg-config package, if such is available.
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405
406LOOKUP_DBM=yes
407LOOKUP_LSEARCH=yes
663ee6d9 408LOOKUP_DNSDB=yes
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409
410# LOOKUP_CDB=yes
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411# LOOKUP_DSEARCH=yes
412# LOOKUP_IBASE=yes
ffc92d69 413# LOOKUP_JSON=yes
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414# LOOKUP_LDAP=yes
415# LOOKUP_MYSQL=yes
31beb797 416# LOOKUP_MYSQL_PC=mariadb
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417# LOOKUP_NIS=yes
418# LOOKUP_NISPLUS=yes
419# LOOKUP_ORACLE=yes
420# LOOKUP_PASSWD=yes
421# LOOKUP_PGSQL=yes
de78e2d5 422# LOOKUP_REDIS=yes
13b685f9 423# LOOKUP_SQLITE=yes
f4b00a2d 424# LOOKUP_SQLITE_PC=sqlite3
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425# LOOKUP_WHOSON=yes
426
427# These two settings are obsolete; all three lookups are compiled when
428# LOOKUP_LSEARCH is enabled. However, we retain these for backward
429# compatibility. Setting one forces LOOKUP_LSEARCH if it is not set.
430
431# LOOKUP_WILDLSEARCH=yes
432# LOOKUP_NWILDLSEARCH=yes
433
434
435#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
436# If you have set LOOKUP_LDAP=yes, you should set LDAP_LIB_TYPE to indicate
437# which LDAP library you have. Unfortunately, though most of their functions
438# are the same, there are minor differences. Currently Exim knows about four
439# LDAP libraries: the one from the University of Michigan (also known as
440# OpenLDAP 1), OpenLDAP 2, the Netscape SDK library, and the library that comes
441# with Solaris 7 onwards. Uncomment whichever of these you are using.
442
443# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=OPENLDAP1
444# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=OPENLDAP2
445# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=NETSCAPE
446# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=SOLARIS
447
448# If you don't set any of these, Exim assumes the original University of
449# Michigan (OpenLDAP 1) library.
450
451
452#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
65872480 453# The PCRE library is required for Exim. There is no longer an embedded
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454# version of the PCRE library included with the source code, instead you
455# must use a system library or build your own copy of PCRE.
456# In either case you must specify the library link info here. If the
457# PCRE header files are not in the standard search path you must also
458# modify the INCLUDE path (above)
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459#
460# Use PCRE_CONFIG to query the pcre-config command (first found in $PATH)
461# to find the include files and libraries, else use PCRE_LIBS and set INCLUDE
462# too if needed.
8eb9f5bd 463
6cda585a 464PCRE_CONFIG=yes
6a6084f8 465# PCRE_LIBS=-lpcre
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466
467
468#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
59c0959a 469# Comment out the following line to remove DANE support
c0635b6d 470# Note: Enabling this unconditionally overrides DISABLE_DNSSEC
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471# forces you to have SUPPORT_TLS enabled (the default). For DANE under
472# GnuTLS we need an additional library. See TLS_LIBS or USE_GNUTLS_PC
473# below.
59c0959a 474SUPPORT_DANE=yes
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475
476#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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477# Additional libraries and include directories may be required for some
478# lookup styles (e.g. LDAP, MYSQL or PGSQL). LOOKUP_LIBS is included only on
479# the command for linking Exim itself, not on any auxiliary programs. You
480# don't need to set LOOKUP_INCLUDE if the relevant directories are already
481# specified in INCLUDE. The settings below are just examples; -lpq is for
de78e2d5 482# PostgreSQL, -lgds is for Interbase, -lsqlite3 is for SQLite, -lhiredis
ffc92d69 483# is for Redis, -ljansson for JSON.
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484#
485# You do not need to use this for any lookup information added via pkg-config.
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486
487# LOOKUP_INCLUDE=-I /usr/local/ldap/include -I /usr/local/mysql/include -I /usr/local/pgsql/include
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488# LOOKUP_LIBS=-L/usr/local/lib -lldap -llber -lmysqlclient -lpq -lgds -lsqlite3
489
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490
491#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
492# Compiling the Exim monitor: If you want to compile the Exim monitor, a
493# program that requires an X11 display, then EXIM_MONITOR should be set to the
494# value "eximon.bin". Comment out this setting to disable compilation of the
495# monitor. The locations of various X11 directories for libraries and include
496# files are defaulted in the OS/Makefile-Default file, but can be overridden in
497# local OS-specific make files.
498
499EXIM_MONITOR=eximon.bin
500
2050824c 501
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502#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
503# Compiling Exim with content scanning support: If you want to compile Exim
504# with support for message body content scanning, set WITH_CONTENT_SCAN to
505# the value "yes". This will give you malware and spam scanning in the DATA ACL,
506# and the MIME ACL. Please read the documentation to learn more about these
507# features.
508
f7b63901 509# WITH_CONTENT_SCAN=yes
8523533c 510
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511# If you have content scanning you may wish to only include some of the scanner
512# interfaces. Uncomment any of these lines to remove that code.
513
514# DISABLE_MAL_FFROTD=yes
515# DISABLE_MAL_FFROT6D=yes
516# DISABLE_MAL_DRWEB=yes
c11d665d 517# DISABLE_MAL_FSECURE=yes
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518# DISABLE_MAL_SOPHIE=yes
519# DISABLE_MAL_CLAM=yes
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520# DISABLE_MAL_AVAST=yes
521# DISABLE_MAL_SOCK=yes
522# DISABLE_MAL_CMDLINE=yes
523
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524# These scanners are claimed to be no longer existent.
525
526DISABLE_MAL_AVE=yes
527DISABLE_MAL_KAV=yes
528DISABLE_MAL_MKS=yes
529
c11d665d 530
f0989ec0 531#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
f444c2c7 532# If built with TLS, Exim includes code to support DKIM (DomainKeys Identified
a8c8d6b5
JJ
533# Mail, RFC4871) signing and verification. Verification of signatures is
534# turned on by default. See the spec for information on conditionally
535# disabling it. To disable the inclusion of the entire feature, set
536# DISABLE_DKIM to "yes"
537
538# DISABLE_DKIM=yes
539
8ccd00b1
JH
540#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
541# Uncomment the following line to remove Per-Recipient-Data-Response support.
542
543# DISABLE_PRDR=yes
a8c8d6b5
JJ
544
545#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
f2de3a33
JH
546# Uncomment the following line to remove OCSP stapling support in TLS,
547# from Exim. Note it can only be supported when built with
548# GnuTLS 3.1.3 or later, or OpenSSL
549
550# DISABLE_OCSP=yes
551
552#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1f4a55da
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553# By default, Exim has support for checking the AD bit in a DNS response, to
554# determine if DNSSEC validation was successful. If your system libraries
555# do not support that bit, then set DISABLE_DNSSEC to "yes"
c0635b6d 556# Note: Enabling SUPPORT_DANE unconditionally overrides this setting.
1f4a55da
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557
558# DISABLE_DNSSEC=yes
559
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560# To disable support for Events set DISABLE_EVENT to "yes"
561
562# DISABLE_EVENT=yes
563
1f4a55da 564
4e48d56c
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565# Uncomment this line to include support for early pipelining, per
566# https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft-harris-early-pipe/
1dac7968 567# SUPPORT_PIPE_CONNECT=yes
4e48d56c
JH
568
569
1f4a55da 570#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
8523533c
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571# Compiling Exim with experimental features. These are documented in
572# experimental-spec.txt. "Experimental" means that the way these features are
f7b63901 573# implemented may still change. Backward compatibility is not guaranteed.
8523533c 574
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575# Uncomment the following line to add support for talking to dccifd. This
576# defaults the socket path to /usr/local/dcc/var/dccifd.
b83823bd 577# Doing so will also explicitly turn on the WITH_CONTENT_SCAN option.
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578
579# EXPERIMENTAL_DCC=yes
580
f7b63901 581# Uncomment the following lines to add SRS (Sender rewriting scheme) support.
8523533c
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582# You need to have libsrs_alt installed on your system (srs.mirtol.com).
583# Depending on where it is installed you may have to edit the CFLAGS and
584# LDFLAGS lines.
8523533c 585
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586# EXPERIMENTAL_SRS=yes
587# CFLAGS += -I/usr/local/include
588# LDFLAGS += -lsrs_alt
589
78f72498 590# Uncomment the following line to add DMARC checking capability, implemented
fd5a6ffb 591# using libopendmarc libraries. You must have SPF and DKIM support enabled also.
78f72498
JH
592# EXPERIMENTAL_DMARC=yes
593# CFLAGS += -I/usr/local/include
594# LDFLAGS += -lopendmarc
675a2142
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595# Uncomment the following if you need to change the default. You can
596# override it at runtime (main config option dmarc_tld_file)
597# DMARC_TLD_FILE=/etc/exim/opendmarc.tlds
78f72498 598
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599# Uncomment the following line to add ARC (Authenticated Received Chain)
600# support. You must have SPF and DKIM support enabled also.
fd5a6ffb 601# EXPERIMENTAL_ARC=yes
617d3932 602
f7b63901 603# Uncomment the following lines to add Brightmail AntiSpam support. You need
8523533c
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604# to have the Brightmail client SDK installed. Please check the experimental
605# documentation for implementation details. You need to edit the CFLAGS and
606# LDFLAGS lines.
f7b63901
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607
608# EXPERIMENTAL_BRIGHTMAIL=yes
609# CFLAGS += -I/opt/brightmail/bsdk-6.0/include
12cdb9e7 610# LDFLAGS += -lxml2_single -lbmiclient_single -L/opt/brightmail/bsdk-6.0/lib
8523533c 611
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612# Uncomment the following to include extra information in fail DSN message (bounces)
613# EXPERIMENTAL_DSN_INFO=yes
614
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615# Uncomment the following to add LMDB lookup support
616# You need to have LMDB installed on your system (https://github.com/LMDB/lmdb)
617# Depending on where it is installed you may have to edit the CFLAGS and LDFLAGS lines.
618# EXPERIMENTAL_LMDB=yes
619# CFLAGS += -I/usr/local/include
620# LDFLAGS += -llmdb
621
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622# Uncomment the following line to add queuefile transport support
623# EXPERIMENTAL_QUEUEFILE=yes
624
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625# Uncomment the following line to include support for TLS Resumption
626# EXPERIMENTAL_TLS_RESUME=yes
627
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628###############################################################################
629# THESE ARE THINGS YOU MIGHT WANT TO SPECIFY #
630###############################################################################
631
632# The items in this section are those that are commonly changed according to
633# the sysadmin's preferences, but whose defaults are often acceptable. The
634# first five are concerned with security issues, where differing levels of
635# paranoia are appropriate in different environments. Sysadmins also vary in
636# their views on appropriate levels of defence in these areas. If you do not
637# understand these issues, go with the defaults, which are used by many sites.
638
639
640#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
641# Although Exim is normally a setuid program, owned by root, it refuses to run
642# local deliveries as root by default. There is a runtime option called
643# "never_users" which lists the users that must never be used for local
644# deliveries. There is also the setting below, which provides a list that
645# cannot be overridden at runtime. This guards against problems caused by
646# unauthorized changes to the runtime configuration. You are advised not to
647# remove "root" from this option, but you can add other users if you want. The
926e1192 648# list is colon-separated. It must NOT contain any spaces.
059ec3d9 649
926e1192 650# FIXED_NEVER_USERS=root:bin:daemon
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651FIXED_NEVER_USERS=root
652
653
654#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
c1d94452
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655# By default, Exim insists that its configuration file be owned by root. You
656# can specify one additional permitted owner here.
059ec3d9
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657
658# CONFIGURE_OWNER=
659
35edf2ff 660# If the configuration file is group-writeable, Exim insists by default that it
c1d94452 661# is owned by root. You can specify one additional permitted group owner here.
35edf2ff
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662
663# CONFIGURE_GROUP=
664
665# If you specify CONFIGURE_OWNER or CONFIGURE_GROUP as a name, this is looked
666# up at build time, and the uid or gid number is built into the binary.
667# However, you can specify that the lookup is deferred until runtime. In this
668# case, it is the name that is built into the binary. You can do this by a
669# setting of the form:
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670
671# CONFIGURE_OWNER=ref:mail
35edf2ff 672# CONFIGURE_GROUP=ref:sysadmin
059ec3d9 673
35edf2ff
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674# In other words, put "ref:" in front of the user or group name. Although this
675# costs a bit of resource at runtime, it is convenient to use this feature when
676# building binaries that are to be run on multiple systems where the names may
677# refer to different uids or gids. It also allows you to build Exim on a system
678# where the relevant user or group is not defined.
059ec3d9
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679
680
681#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
682# The -C option allows Exim to be run with an alternate runtime configuration
cd25e41d
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683# file. When this is used by root, root privilege is retained by the binary
684# (for any other caller including the Exim user, it is dropped). You can
685# restrict the location of alternate configurations by defining a prefix below.
686# Any file used with -C must then start with this prefix (except that /dev/null
687# is also permitted if the caller is root, because that is used in the install
688# script). If the prefix specifies a directory that is owned by root, a
689# compromise of the Exim account does not permit arbitrary alternate
690# configurations to be used. The prefix can be more restrictive than just a
691# directory (the second example).
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692
693# ALT_CONFIG_PREFIX=/some/directory/
694# ALT_CONFIG_PREFIX=/some/directory/exim.conf-
695
696
697#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
261dc43e
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698# When a user other than root uses the -C option to override the configuration
699# file (including the Exim user when re-executing Exim to regain root
700# privileges for local message delivery), this will normally cause Exim to
90b6341f
DW
701# drop root privileges. The TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST option, specifies a file which
702# contains a list of trusted configuration filenames, one per line. If the -C
703# option is used by the Exim user or by the user specified in the
704# CONFIGURE_OWNER setting, to specify a configuration file which is listed in
705# the TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST file, then root privileges are not dropped by Exim.
706
707# TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST=/usr/exim/trusted_configs
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708
709
710#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
059ec3d9
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711# Uncommenting this option disables the use of the -D command line option,
712# which changes the values of macros in the runtime configuration file.
713# This is another protection against somebody breaking into the Exim account.
714
715# DISABLE_D_OPTION=yes
716
717
718#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
a7cbbf50
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719# By contrast, you might be maintaining a system which relies upon the ability
720# to override values with -D and assumes that these will be passed through to
721# the delivery processes. As of Exim 4.73, this is no longer the case by
722# default. Going forward, we strongly recommend that you use a shim Exim
cc5fdbc2 723# configuration file owned by root stored under TRUSTED_CONFIG_LIST.
a7cbbf50
PP
724# That shim can set macros before .include'ing your main configuration file.
725#
726# As a strictly transient measure to ease migration to 4.73, the
4c04137d 727# WHITELIST_D_MACROS value defines a colon-separated list of macro-names
43236f35 728# which are permitted to be overridden from the command-line which will be
a7cbbf50
PP
729# honoured by the Exim user. So these are macros that can persist to delivery
730# time.
731# Examples might be -DTLS or -DSPOOL=/some/dir. The values on the
732# command-line are filtered to only permit: [A-Za-z0-9_/.-]*
733#
734# This option is highly likely to be removed in a future release. It exists
735# only to make 4.73 as easy as possible to migrate to. If you use it, we
736# encourage you to schedule time to rework your configuration to not depend
737# upon it. Most people should not need to use this.
738#
739# By default, no macros are whitelisted for -D usage.
740
741# WHITELIST_D_MACROS=TLS:SPOOL
742
743#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
059ec3d9
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744# Exim has support for the AUTH (authentication) extension of the SMTP
745# protocol, as defined by RFC 2554. If you don't know what SMTP authentication
746# is, you probably won't want to include this code, so you should leave these
747# settings commented out. If you do want to make use of SMTP authentication,
748# you must uncomment at least one of the following, so that appropriate code is
749# included in the Exim binary. You will then need to set up the run time
750# configuration to make use of the mechanism(s) selected.
751
752# AUTH_CRAM_MD5=yes
753# AUTH_CYRUS_SASL=yes
14aa5a05 754# AUTH_DOVECOT=yes
b53c265b 755# AUTH_EXTERNAL=yes
44bbabb5 756# AUTH_GSASL=yes
f4b00a2d
PP
757# AUTH_GSASL_PC=libgsasl
758# AUTH_HEIMDAL_GSSAPI=yes
759# AUTH_HEIMDAL_GSSAPI_PC=heimdal-gssapi
5dc309a4 760# AUTH_HEIMDAL_GSSAPI_PC=heimdal-gssapi heimdal-krb5
059ec3d9
PH
761# AUTH_PLAINTEXT=yes
762# AUTH_SPA=yes
b3ef41c9 763# AUTH_TLS=yes
059ec3d9 764
5dc309a4
PP
765# Heimdal through 1.5 required pkg-config 'heimdal-gssapi'; Heimdal 7.1
766# requires multiple pkg-config files to work with Exim, so the second example
767# above is needed.
059ec3d9
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768
769#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
770# If you specified AUTH_CYRUS_SASL above, you should ensure that you have the
771# Cyrus SASL library installed before trying to build Exim, and you probably
f4b00a2d
PP
772# want to uncomment the first line below.
773# Similarly for GNU SASL, unless pkg-config is used via AUTH_GSASL_PC.
774# Ditto for AUTH_HEIMDAL_GSSAPI(_PC).
059ec3d9
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775
776# AUTH_LIBS=-lsasl2
44bbabb5 777# AUTH_LIBS=-lgsasl
f4b00a2d 778# AUTH_LIBS=-lgssapi -lheimntlm -lkrb5 -lhx509 -lcom_err -lhcrypto -lasn1 -lwind -lroken -lcrypt
059ec3d9
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779
780
781#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
782# When Exim is decoding MIME "words" in header lines, most commonly for use
783# in the $header_xxx expansion, it converts any foreign character sets to the
784# one that is set in the headers_charset option. The default setting is
785# defined by this setting:
786
787HEADERS_CHARSET="ISO-8859-1"
788
789# If you are going to make use of $header_xxx expansions in your configuration
790# file, or if your users are going to use them in filter files, and the normal
791# character set on your host is something other than ISO-8859-1, you might
792# like to specify a different default here. This value can be overridden in
793# the runtime configuration, and it can also be overridden in individual filter
794# files.
795#
796# IMPORTANT NOTE: The iconv() function is needed for character code
797# conversions. Please see the next item...
798
799
800#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
801# Character code conversions are possible only if the iconv() function is
802# installed on your operating system. There are two places in Exim where this
803# is relevant: (a) The $header_xxx expansion (see the previous item), and (b)
804# the Sieve filter support. For those OS where iconv() is known to be installed
805# as standard, the file in OS/Makefile-xxxx contains
806#
807# HAVE_ICONV=yes
808#
809# If you are not using one of those systems, but have installed iconv(), you
810# need to uncomment that line above. In some cases, you may find that iconv()
811# and its header file are not in the default places. You might need to use
812# something like this:
813#
814# HAVE_ICONV=yes
815# CFLAGS=-O -I/usr/local/include
816# EXTRALIBS_EXIM=-L/usr/local/lib -liconv
817#
818# but of course there may need to be other things in CFLAGS and EXTRALIBS_EXIM
819# as well.
863bd541
PP
820#
821# nb: FreeBSD as of 4.89 defines LIBICONV_PLUG to pick up the system iconv
822# more reliably. If you explicitly want the libiconv Port then as well
823# as adding -liconv you'll want to unset LIBICONV_PLUG. If you actually need
824# this, let us know, but for now the Exim Maintainers are assuming that this
825# is uncommon and so you'll need to edit OS/os.h-FreeBSD yourself to remove
826# the define.
059ec3d9
PH
827
828
829#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
830# The passwords for user accounts are normally encrypted with the crypt()
831# function. Comparisons with encrypted passwords can be done using Exim's
832# "crypteq" expansion operator. (This is commonly used as part of the
833# configuration of an authenticator for use with SMTP AUTH.) At least one
834# operating system has an extended function called crypt16(), which uses up to
835# 16 characters of a password (the normal crypt() uses only the first 8). Exim
96c065cb 836# supports the use of crypt16() as well as crypt() but note the warning below.
059ec3d9
PH
837
838# You can always indicate a crypt16-encrypted password by preceding it with
839# "{crypt16}". If you want the default handling (without any preceding
840# indicator) to use crypt16(), uncomment the following line:
841
842# DEFAULT_CRYPT=crypt16
843
844# If you do that, you can still access the basic crypt() function by preceding
845# an encrypted password with "{crypt}". For more details, see the description
846# of the "crypteq" condition in the manual chapter on string expansions.
847
96c065cb
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848# Some operating systems do not include a crypt16() function, so Exim has one
849# of its own, which it uses unless HAVE_CRYPT16 is defined. Normally, that will
850# be set in an OS-specific Makefile for the OS that have such a function, so
851# you should not need to bother with it.
852
853# *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING ***
854# It turns out that the above is not entirely accurate. As well as crypt16()
855# there is a function called bigcrypt() that some operating systems have. This
856# may or may not use the same algorithm, and both of them may be different to
857# Exim's built-in crypt16() that is used unless HAVE_CRYPT16 is defined.
858#
859# However, since there is now a move away from the traditional crypt()
860# functions towards using SHA1 and other algorithms, tidying up this area of
861# Exim is seen as very low priority. In practice, if you need to, you can
862# define DEFAULT_CRYPT to the name of any function that has the same interface
863# as the traditional crypt() function.
864# *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING *** WARNING ***
059ec3d9
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865
866
867#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
059ec3d9
PH
868# The default distribution of Exim contains only the plain text form of the
869# documentation. Other forms are available separately. If you want to install
870# the documentation in "info" format, first fetch the Texinfo documentation
871# sources from the ftp directory and unpack them, which should create files
872# with the extension "texinfo" in the doc directory. You may find that the
873# version number of the texinfo files is different to your Exim version number,
874# because the main documentation isn't updated as often as the code. For
65872480 875# example, if you have Exim version 4.43, the source tarball unpacks into a
059ec3d9
PH
876# directory called exim-4.43, but the texinfo tarball unpacks into exim-4.40.
877# In this case, move the contents of exim-4.40/doc into exim-4.43/doc after you
878# have unpacked them. Then set INFO_DIRECTORY to the location of your info
879# directory. This varies from system to system, but is often /usr/share/info.
880# Once you have done this, "make install" will build the info files and
881# install them in the directory you have defined.
882
883# INFO_DIRECTORY=/usr/share/info
884
885
886#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
887# Exim log directory and files: Exim creates several log files inside a
888# single log directory. You can define the directory and the form of the
889# log file name here. If you do not set anything, Exim creates a directory
890# called "log" inside its spool directory (see SPOOL_DIRECTORY above) and uses
891# the filenames "mainlog", "paniclog", and "rejectlog". If you want to change
892# this, you can set LOG_FILE_PATH to a path name containing one occurrence of
893# %s. This will be replaced by one of the strings "main", "panic", or "reject"
894# to form the final file names. Some installations may want something like this:
895
896# LOG_FILE_PATH=/var/log/exim_%slog
897
898# which results in files with names /var/log/exim_mainlog, etc. The directory
899# in which the log files are placed must exist; Exim does not try to create
900# it for itself. It is also your responsibility to ensure that Exim is capable
901# of writing files using this path name. The Exim user (see EXIM_USER above)
902# must be able to create and update files in the directory you have specified.
903
904# You can also configure Exim to use syslog, instead of or as well as log
905# files, by settings such as these
906
907# LOG_FILE_PATH=syslog
908# LOG_FILE_PATH=syslog:/var/log/exim_%slog
909
910# The first of these uses only syslog; the second uses syslog and also writes
911# to log files. Do not include white space in such a setting as it messes up
912# the building process.
913
914
915#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
916# When logging to syslog, the following option caters for syslog replacements
917# that are able to accept log entries longer than the 1024 characters allowed
918# by RFC 3164. It is up to you to make sure your syslog daemon can handle this.
919# Non-printable characters are usually unacceptable regardless, so log entries
920# are still split on newline characters.
921
922# SYSLOG_LONG_LINES=yes
923
924# If you are not interested in the process identifier (pid) of the Exim that is
925# making the call to syslog, then comment out the following line.
926
927SYSLOG_LOG_PID=yes
928
929
930#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
931# Cycling log files: this variable specifies the maximum number of old
932# log files that are kept by the exicyclog log-cycling script. You don't have
933# to use exicyclog. If your operating system has other ways of cycling log
934# files, you can use them instead. The exicyclog script isn't run by default;
935# you have to set up a cron job for it if you want it.
936
937EXICYCLOG_MAX=10
938
939
940#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
941# The compress command is used by the exicyclog script to compress old log
942# files. Both the name of the command and the suffix that it adds to files
943# need to be defined here. See also the EXICYCLOG_MAX configuration.
944
945COMPRESS_COMMAND=/usr/bin/gzip
946COMPRESS_SUFFIX=gz
947
948
949#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
950# If the exigrep utility is fed compressed log files, it tries to uncompress
951# them using this command.
952
fd4c285c
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953# Leave it empty to enforce autodetection at runtime:
954# ZCAT_COMMAND=
955#
956# Omit the path if you want to use your system's PATH:
957# ZCAT_COMMAND=zcat
958#
959# Or specify the full pathname:
059ec3d9
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960ZCAT_COMMAND=/usr/bin/zcat
961
059ec3d9
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962#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
963# Compiling in support for embedded Perl: If you want to be able to
964# use Perl code in Exim's string manipulation language and you have Perl
965# (version 5.004 or later) installed, set EXIM_PERL to perl.o. Using embedded
966# Perl costs quite a lot of resources. Only do this if you really need it.
967
968# EXIM_PERL=perl.o
969
970
971#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1a46a8c5
PH
972# Support for dynamically-loaded string expansion functions via ${dlfunc. If
973# you are using gcc the dynamically-loaded object must be compiled with the
974# -shared option, and you will need to add -export-dynamic to EXTRALIBS so
1ea70a03 975# that the local_scan API is made available by the linker. You may also need
612ba564 976# to add -ldl to EXTRALIBS so that dlopen() is available to Exim.
1a46a8c5
PH
977
978# EXPAND_DLFUNC=yes
979
980
981#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
059ec3d9
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982# Exim has support for PAM (Pluggable Authentication Modules), a facility
983# which is available in the latest releases of Solaris and in some GNU/Linux
984# distributions (see http://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/libs/pam/). The Exim
985# support, which is intended for use in conjunction with the SMTP AUTH
986# facilities, is included only when requested by the following setting:
987
988# SUPPORT_PAM=yes
989
990# You probably need to add -lpam to EXTRALIBS, and in some releases of
991# GNU/Linux -ldl is also needed.
992
993
994#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
f0989ec0 995# Proxying.
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996#
997# If you may want to use outbound (client-side) proxying, using Socks5,
998# uncomment the line below.
f0989ec0
JH
999
1000# SUPPORT_SOCKS=yes
1001
cee5f132
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1002# If you may want to use inbound (server-side) proxying, using Proxy Protocol,
1003# uncomment the line below.
1004
1005# SUPPORT_PROXY=yes
1006
1007
8c5d388a
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1008#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1009# Internationalisation.
1010#
1011# Uncomment the following to include Internationalisation features. This is the
1012# SMTPUTF8 ESMTP extension, and associated facilities for handling UTF8 domain
9427e879 1013# and localparts, per RFC 3490 (IDNA2003).
8c5d388a 1014# You need to have the IDN library installed.
9427e879
JH
1015# If you want IDNA2008 mappings per RFCs 5890, 6530 and 6533, you additionally
1016# need libidn2 and SUPPORT_I18N_2008.
8c5d388a
JH
1017
1018# SUPPORT_I18N=yes
1019# LDFLAGS += -lidn
9427e879
JH
1020# SUPPORT_I18N_2008=yes
1021# LDFLAGS += -lidn -lidn2
8c5d388a 1022
f0989ec0
JH
1023
1024#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
7952eef9
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1025# Uncomment the following lines to add SPF support. You need to have libspf2
1026# installed on your system (www.libspf2.org). Depending on where it is installed
1027# you may have to edit the CFLAGS and LDFLAGS lines.
1028
1029# SUPPORT_SPF=yes
1030# CFLAGS += -I/usr/local/include
1031# LDFLAGS += -lspf2
1032
1033
1034#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
059ec3d9
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1035# Support for authentication via Radius is also available. The Exim support,
1036# which is intended for use in conjunction with the SMTP AUTH facilities,
1037# is included only when requested by setting the following parameter to the
1038# location of your Radius configuration file:
1039
1040# RADIUS_CONFIG_FILE=/etc/radiusclient/radiusclient.conf
1041# RADIUS_CONFIG_FILE=/etc/radius.conf
1042
1043# If you have set RADIUS_CONFIG_FILE, you should also set one of these to
1044# indicate which RADIUS library is used:
059ec3d9
PH
1045
1046# RADIUS_LIB_TYPE=RADIUSCLIENT
7766a4f0 1047# RADIUS_LIB_TYPE=RADIUSCLIENTNEW
059ec3d9
PH
1048# RADIUS_LIB_TYPE=RADLIB
1049
7766a4f0
PH
1050# RADIUSCLIENT is the radiusclient library; you probably need to add
1051# -lradiusclient to EXTRALIBS.
1052#
1053# The API for the radiusclient library was changed at release 0.4.0.
1054# Unfortunately, the header file does not define a version number that clients
1055# can use to support both the old and new APIs. If you are using version 0.4.0
1056# or later of the radiusclient library, you should use RADIUSCLIENTNEW.
1057#
1058# RADLIB is the Radius library that comes with FreeBSD (the header file is
1059# called radlib.h); you probably need to add -lradius to EXTRALIBS.
1060#
1061# If you do not set RADIUS_LIB_TYPE, Exim assumes the radiusclient library,
1062# using the original API.
059ec3d9
PH
1063
1064
1065#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1066# Support for authentication via the Cyrus SASL pwcheck daemon is available.
1067# Note, however, that pwcheck is now deprecated in favour of saslauthd (see
1068# next item). The Exim support for pwcheck, which is intented for use in
1069# conjunction with the SMTP AUTH facilities, is included only when requested by
1070# setting the following parameter to the location of the pwcheck daemon's
1071# socket.
1072#
1073# There is no need to install all of SASL on your system. You just need to run
1074# ./configure --with-pwcheck, cd to the pwcheck directory within the sources,
1075# make and make install. You must create the socket directory (default
65872480 1076# /var/pwcheck) and chown it to Exim's user and group. Once you have installed
059ec3d9
PH
1077# pwcheck, you should arrange for it to be started by root at boot time.
1078
1079# CYRUS_PWCHECK_SOCKET=/var/pwcheck/pwcheck
1080
1081
1082#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1083# Support for authentication via the Cyrus SASL saslauthd daemon is available.
65872480 1084# The Exim support, which is intended for use in conjunction with the SMTP AUTH
059ec3d9
PH
1085# facilities, is included only when requested by setting the following
1086# parameter to the location of the saslauthd daemon's socket.
1087#
1088# There is no need to install all of SASL on your system. You just need to run
1089# ./configure --with-saslauthd (and any other options you need, for example, to
1090# select or deselect authentication mechanisms), cd to the saslauthd directory
1091# within the sources, make and make install. You must create the socket
65872480 1092# directory (default /var/state/saslauthd) and chown it to Exim's user and
059ec3d9
PH
1093# group. Once you have installed saslauthd, you should arrange for it to be
1094# started by root at boot time.
1095
1096# CYRUS_SASLAUTHD_SOCKET=/var/state/saslauthd/mux
1097
1098
1099#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1100# TCP wrappers: If you want to use tcpwrappers from within Exim, uncomment
1101# this setting. See the manual section entitled "Use of tcpwrappers" in the
1102# chapter on building and installing Exim.
1103#
1104# USE_TCP_WRAPPERS=yes
1105#
1106# You may well also have to specify a local "include" file and an additional
1107# library for TCP wrappers, so you probably need something like this:
1108#
1109# USE_TCP_WRAPPERS=yes
1110# CFLAGS=-O -I/usr/local/include
1111# EXTRALIBS_EXIM=-L/usr/local/lib -lwrap
1112#
1113# but of course there may need to be other things in CFLAGS and EXTRALIBS_EXIM
1114# as well.
5dc43717
JJ
1115#
1116# To use a name other than exim in the tcpwrappers config file,
1117# e.g. if you're running multiple daemons with different access lists,
1118# or multiple MTAs with the same access list, define
1119# TCP_WRAPPERS_DAEMON_NAME accordingly
1120#
1121# TCP_WRAPPERS_DAEMON_NAME="exim"
059ec3d9
PH
1122
1123
1124#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1125# The default action of the exim_install script (which is run by "make
1126# install") is to install the Exim binary with a unique name such as
1127# exim-4.43-1, and then set up a symbolic link called "exim" to reference it,
1128# moving the symbolic link from any previous version. If you define NO_SYMLINK
1129# (the value doesn't matter), the symbolic link is not created or moved. You
1130# will then have to "turn Exim on" by setting up the link manually.
1131
1132# NO_SYMLINK=yes
1133
1134
1135#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1136# Another default action of the install script is to install a default runtime
1137# configuration file if one does not exist. This configuration has a router for
1138# expanding system aliases. The default assumes that these aliases are kept
1139# in the traditional file called /etc/aliases. If such a file does not exist,
1140# the installation script creates one that contains just comments (no actual
1141# aliases). The following setting can be changed to specify a different
1142# location for the system alias file.
1143
1144SYSTEM_ALIASES_FILE=/etc/aliases
1145
1146
1147#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1148# There are some testing options (-be, -bt, -bv) that read data from the
1149# standard input when no arguments are supplied. By default, the input lines
1150# are read using the standard fgets() function. This does not support line
1151# editing during interactive input (though the terminal's "erase" character
1152# works as normal). If your operating system has the readline() function, and
1153# in addition supports dynamic loading of library functions, you can cause
1154# Exim to use readline() for the -be testing option (only) by uncommenting the
1155# following setting. Dynamic loading is used so that the library is loaded only
1156# when the -be testing option is given; by the time the loading occurs,
1157# Exim has given up its root privilege and is running as the calling user. This
1158# is the reason why readline() is NOT supported for -bt and -bv, because Exim
1159# runs as root or as exim, respectively, for those options. When USE_READLINE
1160# is "yes", as well as supporting line editing, a history of input lines in the
1161# current run is maintained.
1162
1163# USE_READLINE=yes
1164
79b5812b 1165# You may need to add -ldl to EXTRALIBS when you set USE_READLINE=yes.
b08b24c8
PH
1166# Note that this option adds to the size of the Exim binary, because the
1167# dynamic loading library is not otherwise included.
1168
bdde2215
PP
1169# If libreadline is not in the normal library paths, then because Exim is
1170# setuid you'll need to ensure that the correct directory is stamped into
1171# the binary so that dlopen will find it.
1172# Eg, on macOS/Darwin with a third-party install of libreadline, perhaps:
1173
1174# EXTRALIBS_EXIM+=-Wl,-rpath,/usr/local/opt/readline/lib
1175
059ec3d9 1176
e9eb3457
JH
1177#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1178# Uncomment this setting to include IPv6 support.
1179
37dd1b19 1180# HAVE_IPV6=yes
059ec3d9
PH
1181
1182###############################################################################
1183# THINGS YOU ALMOST NEVER NEED TO MENTION #
1184###############################################################################
1185
1186# The settings in this section are available for use in special circumstances.
1187# In the vast majority of installations you need not change anything below.
1188
1189
1190#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1191# The following commands live in different places in some OS. Either the
1192# ultimate default settings, or the OS-specific files should already point to
1193# the right place, but they can be overridden here if necessary. These settings
1194# are used when building various scripts to ensure that the correct paths are
1195# used when the scripts are run. They are not used in the Makefile itself. Perl
1196# is not necessary for running Exim unless you set EXIM_PERL (see above) to get
1197# it embedded, but there are some utilities that are Perl scripts. If you
1198# haven't got Perl, Exim will still build and run; you just won't be able to
1199# use those utilities.
1200
1201# CHOWN_COMMAND=/usr/bin/chown
1202# CHGRP_COMMAND=/usr/bin/chgrp
c2f9a1ee 1203# CHMOD_COMMAND=/usr/bin/chmod
059ec3d9
PH
1204# MV_COMMAND=/bin/mv
1205# RM_COMMAND=/bin/rm
c2f9a1ee 1206# TOUCH_COMMAND=/usr/bin/touch
059ec3d9
PH
1207# PERL_COMMAND=/usr/bin/perl
1208
1209
1210#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1211# The following macro can be used to change the command for building a library
1212# of functions. By default the "ar" command is used, with options "cq".
1213# Only in rare circumstances should you need to change this.
1214
1215# AR=ar cq
1216
1217
1218#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1219# In some operating systems, the value of the TMPDIR environment variable
1220# controls where temporary files are created. Exim does not make use of
1221# temporary files, except when delivering to MBX mailboxes. However, if Exim
1222# calls any external libraries (e.g. DBM libraries), they may use temporary
1223# files, and thus be influenced by the value of TMPDIR. For this reason, when
1224# Exim starts, it checks the environment for TMPDIR, and if it finds it is set,
1225# it replaces the value with what is defined here. Commenting this setting
8f3bfb82
HSHR
1226# suppresses the check altogether. Older installations call this macro
1227# just TMPDIR, but this has side effects at build time. At runtime
1228# TMPDIR is checked as before.
059ec3d9 1229
75286da3 1230EXIM_TMPDIR="/tmp"
059ec3d9
PH
1231
1232
1233#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1234# The following macros can be used to change the default modes that are used
1235# by the appendfile transport. In most installations the defaults are just
1236# fine, and in any case, you can change particular instances of the transport
1237# at run time if you want.
1238
1239# APPENDFILE_MODE=0600
1240# APPENDFILE_DIRECTORY_MODE=0700
1241# APPENDFILE_LOCKFILE_MODE=0600
1242
1243
1244#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1245# In some installations there may be multiple machines sharing file systems,
1246# where a different configuration file is required for Exim on the different
1247# machines. If CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_NODE is defined, then Exim will first look
1248# for a configuration file whose name is that defined by CONFIGURE_FILE,
1249# with the node name obtained by uname() tacked on the end, separated by a
1250# period (for example, /usr/exim/configure.host.in.some.domain). If this file
1251# does not exist, then the bare configuration file name is tried.
1252
1253# CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_NODE=yes
1254
1255
1256#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1257# In some esoteric configurations two different versions of Exim are run,
1258# with different setuid values, and different configuration files are required
1259# to handle the different cases. If CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_EUID is defined, then
1260# Exim will first look for a configuration file whose name is that defined
1261# by CONFIGURE_FILE, with the effective uid tacked on the end, separated by
65872480 1262# a period (for example, /usr/exim/configure.0). If this file does not exist,
059ec3d9
PH
1263# then the bare configuration file name is tried. In the case when both
1264# CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_EUID and CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_NODE are set, four files
1265# are tried: <name>.<euid>.<node>, <name>.<node>, <name>.<euid>, and <name>.
1266
1267# CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_EUID=yes
1268
1269
1270#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1271# The size of the delivery buffers: These specify the sizes (in bytes) of
1272# the buffers that are used when copying a message from the spool to a
1273# destination. There is rarely any need to change these values.
1274
1275# DELIVER_IN_BUFFER_SIZE=8192
1276# DELIVER_OUT_BUFFER_SIZE=8192
1277
1278
1279#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1280# The mode of the database directory: Exim creates a directory called "db"
1281# in its spool directory, to hold its databases of hints. This variable
1282# determines the mode of the created directory. The default value in the
1283# source is 0750.
1284
1285# EXIMDB_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
1286
1287
1288#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1289# Database file mode: The mode of files created in the "db" directory defaults
1290# to 0640 in the source, and can be changed here.
1291
1292# EXIMDB_MODE=0640
1293
1294
1295#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1296# Database lock file mode: The mode of zero-length files created in the "db"
1297# directory to use for locking purposes defaults to 0640 in the source, and
1298# can be changed here.
1299
1300# EXIMDB_LOCKFILE_MODE=0640
1301
1302
1303#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1304# This parameter sets the maximum length of the header portion of a message
1305# that Exim is prepared to process. The default setting is one megabyte. The
1306# limit exists in order to catch rogue mailers that might connect to your SMTP
1307# port, start off a header line, and then just pump junk at it for ever. The
1308# message_size_limit option would also catch this, but it may not be set.
1309# The value set here is the default; it can be changed at runtime.
1310
1311# HEADER_MAXSIZE="(1024*1024)"
1312
1313
1314#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1315# The mode of the input directory: The input directory is where messages are
1316# kept while awaiting delivery. Exim creates it if necessary, using a mode
1317# which can be defined here (default 0750).
1318
1319# INPUT_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
1320
1321
1322#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1323# The mode of Exim's log directory, when it is created by Exim inside the spool
1324# directory, defaults to 0750 but can be changed here.
1325
1326# LOG_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
1327
1328
1329#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1330# The log files themselves are created as required, with a mode that defaults
1331# to 0640, but which can be changed here.
1332
1333# LOG_MODE=0640
1334
1335
1336#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1337# The TESTDB lookup is for performing tests on the handling of lookup results,
1338# and is not useful for general running. It should be included only when
1339# debugging the code of Exim.
1340
1341# LOOKUP_TESTDB=yes
1342
1343
1344#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1345# /bin/sh is used by default as the shell in which to run commands that are
1346# defined in the makefiles. This can be changed if necessary, by uncommenting
1347# this line and specifying another shell, but note that a Bourne-compatible
1348# shell is expected.
1349
1350# MAKE_SHELL=/bin/sh
1351
1352
1353#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1354# The maximum number of named lists of each type (address, domain, host, and
1355# local part) can be increased by changing this value. It should be set to
1356# a multiple of 16.
1357
1358# MAX_NAMED_LIST=16
1359
1360
1361#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1362# Network interfaces: Unless you set the local_interfaces option in the runtime
1363# configuration file to restrict Exim to certain interfaces only, it will run
1364# code to find all the interfaces there are on your host. Unfortunately,
1365# the call to the OS that does this requires a buffer large enough to hold
1366# data for all the interfaces - it was designed in the days when a host rarely
1367# had more than three or four interfaces. Nowadays hosts can have very many
1368# virtual interfaces running on the same hardware. If you have more than 250
1369# virtual interfaces, you will need to uncomment this setting and increase the
1370# value.
1371
1372# MAXINTERFACES=250
1373
1374
1375#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1376# Per-message logs: While a message is in the process of being delivered,
1377# comments on its progress are written to a message log, for the benefit of
1378# human administrators. These logs are held in a directory called "msglog"
1379# in the spool directory. Its mode defaults to 0750, but can be changed here.
1380# The message log directory is also used for storing files that are used by
1381# transports for returning data to a message's sender (see the "return_output"
1382# option for transports).
1383
1384# MSGLOG_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
1385
1386
1387#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1388# There are three options which are used when compiling the Perl interface and
1389# when linking with Perl. The default values for these are placed automatically
1390# at the head of the Makefile by the script which builds it. However, if you
1391# want to override them, you can do so here.
1392
1393# PERL_CC=
1394# PERL_CCOPTS=
1395# PERL_LIBS=
1396
1397
1398#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
438257ba
PP
1399# If you wish to disable valgrind in the binary, define NVALGRIND=1.
1400# This should not be needed.
1401
1402# NVALGRIND=1
1403
1404#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
059ec3d9
PH
1405# Identifying the daemon: When an Exim daemon starts up, it writes its pid
1406# (process id) to a file so that it can easily be identified. The path of the
1407# file can be specified here. Some installations may want something like this:
1408
1409# PID_FILE_PATH=/var/lock/exim.pid
1410
1411# If PID_FILE_PATH is not defined, Exim writes a file in its spool directory
1412# using the name "exim-daemon.pid".
1413
1414# If you start up a daemon without the -bd option (for example, with just
1415# the -q15m option), a pid file is not written. Also, if you override the
1416# configuration file with the -oX option, no pid file is written. In other
1417# words, the pid file is written only for a "standard" daemon.
1418
1419
1420#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1421# If Exim creates the spool directory, it is given this mode, defaulting in the
1422# source to 0750.
1423
1424# SPOOL_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750
1425
1426
1427#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1428# The mode of files on the input spool which hold the contents of messages can
1429# be changed here. The default is 0640 so that information from the spool is
1430# available to anyone who is a member of the Exim group.
1431
1432# SPOOL_MODE=0640
1433
1434
1435#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1436# Moving frozen messages: If the following is uncommented, Exim is compiled
1437# with support for automatically moving frozen messages out of the main spool
1438# directory, a facility that is found useful by some large installations. A
1439# run time option is required to cause the moving actually to occur. Such
1440# messages become "invisible" to the normal management tools.
1441
1442# SUPPORT_MOVE_FROZEN_MESSAGES=yes
1443
54fc8428
PH
1444
1445#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
65872480 1446# Expanding match_* second parameters: BE CAREFUL IF ENABLING THIS!
82c6910a
PP
1447# It has proven too easy in practice for administrators to configure security
1448# problems into their Exim install, by treating match_domain{}{} and friends
1449# as a form of string comparison, where the second string comes from untrusted
1450# data. Because these options take lists, which can include lookup;LOOKUPDATA
1451# style elements, a foe can then cause Exim to, eg, execute an arbitrary MySQL
1452# query, dropping tables.
1453# From Exim 4.77 onwards, the second parameter is not expanded; it can still
1454# be a list literal, or a macro, or a named list reference. There is also
1455# the new expansion condition "inlisti" which does expand the second parameter,
1456# but treats it as a list of strings; also, there's "eqi" which is probably
1457# what is normally wanted.
1458#
1459# If you really need to have the old behaviour, know what you are doing and
1460# will not complain if your system is compromised as a result of doing so, then
1461# uncomment this option to get the old behaviour back.
1462
1463# EXPAND_LISTMATCH_RHS=yes
1464
1465#------------------------------------------------------------------------------
54fc8428
PH
1466# Disabling the use of fsync(): DO NOT UNCOMMENT THE FOLLOWING LINE unless you
1467# really, really, really know what you are doing. And even then, think again.
1468# You should never uncomment this when compiling a binary for distribution.
1469# Use it only when compiling Exim for your own use.
1470#
1471# Uncommenting this line enables the use of a runtime option called
1472# disable_fsync, which can be used to stop Exim using fsync() to ensure that
1473# files are written to disc before proceeding. When this is disabled, crashes
1474# and hardware problems such as power outages can cause data to be lost. This
1475# feature should only be used in very exceptional circumstances. YOU HAVE BEEN
1476# WARNED.
1477
1478# ENABLE_DISABLE_FSYNC=yes
1479
059ec3d9 1480# End of EDITME for Exim 4.